Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Best Engineered Car of the 20th Century
1990 - 1999: 1999 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible and 1999 Mercedes-Benz S500


1999 Corvette Convertible. Photo courtesy of GM Archives.


1999 Corvette LSI engine. Photo courtesy of GM Archives.


Mercedes-Benz S500. Photo courtesy of Mercedes-Benz.


S500 V8 engine. Photo courtesy of Mercedes-Benz.


AIR-matic system. Photo courtesy of Mercedes-Benz.


Cutaway of S500. Photo courtesy of Mercedes-Benz.

The Corvette has a long heritage beginning in 1953, when the first 300 production models were assembled by hand and equipped with 3.8-L six cylinder engines. The 1999 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible was available with two transmissions — a 4L60-E four speed automatic with overdrive and a six-speed manual.

The standard engine was the 5.7 L V8 LSI engine equipped with sequential fuel injection. The LSI engine achieves 257 kW (345 hp) at 5600 rpm and 475 N•m (350 lb•ft) of torque at 4400 rpm. The bore is 99 mm (3.90 in), stroke is 92 mm (3.62 in), and compression ratio is 10.1:1. The engine employs an aluminum block with a deep skirt design and aluminum cylinder heads. The intake manifold is constructed of composite materials while the dual-wall exhaust manifold is constructed of high strength stainless steel with an air gap between the walls. A dual electronic spark control sensor, a mass airflow sensor, and an integrated air-fuel module contribute to the overall performance of the engine. One ignition coil per cylinder provides high energy ignition for better combustion, reduced emissions, and enhanced durability. The sequential fuel injection uses one injector and nozzle per cylinder. Each injector is fired sequentially and timed to the intake cycle for accuracy and metering control. Electronic throttle control (ETC) allows precise tailoring of a specific throttle progression. ETC integrates electronic speed control, brake torque management, and traction control in a single controller for mass reduction and high durability.

The chassis features a full length perimeter frame with hydroformed side rails made of tubular steel. The rails are joined by two bumper beams that are welded. The floor is constructed of a balsa-wood-core composite sandwich. The body panels are made of flexible sheet-molded compound. Rear quarter panels are bolted to the structure.

The suspension is a fully independent four-wheel short/long arm system. It is height adjustable at the factory according to specific options and vehicle weight. Forged-aluminum front upper control arms are used along with cast aluminum front/rear lower and rear upper control arms. A transverse composite leaf spring design is used and runs from the one side of the car to the other. Steering is by a Magnasteer II variable effort rack and pinion power steering system. Under this system the steering effort is reduced at low speeds and increases at higher speeds. Steering ratio is 16.1:1.

An active handling system (AHS) operates in concert with the antilock braking system (ABS) and traction control to activate any of the four wheel disc brakes selectively to help counteract oversteer or understeer. The AHS has three settings — one for everyday driving, where all three systems function; off, which disables all three functions; and competition, which disables only the traction control system.

The 1999 Mercedes-Benz S500 was introduced in Europe first as a 1999 model and later in the U.S. as a 2000 model. It is a new version of the S-Class that was first introduced in 1991. Over 430,000 units of the previous version have been produced.

The S500 is so named due to its 164 kW (306 hp) 5.0 L V8 engine. It uses three valves per cylinder and has a dual ignition system. Depending on engine load and revolutions, the two spark plugs per cylinder are not activated simultaneously but with a short time gap. The sequence of spark plug activation also changes after each combustion stroke. The bore is 97 mm (3.8 in) and the stroke is 84 mm (3.3 in) for the 5.0 L engine. Maximum torque for the S500 engine is 460 N•m (339 lb•ft) at 2700 -4200 rpm.

The European version engine employs an automatic cylinder cut-out system that temporarily converts the eight cylinder to a four cylinder as a function of demand in the part load range. In third, fourth, and fifth gear, the cylinder cutout is ready for operation when the engine is operating between 1000 and 3000 rpm, which corresponds to a speed range of 40 to 160 km/h (25 to 100 mph).

In place of a conventional suspension system with coil springs and gas pressure shock absorbers, the S-Class uses a system known as AIR-matic (adaptive intelligent ride control). This system uses a combination of pneumatic suspension and adaptive damping system (ADS). The ADS adjusts the front and rear shock absorber forces to the current payload, condition of the road surface, and the driving style of the driver. A steering angle sensor, three acceleration sensors on the body, and the ABS speed sensor and brake pedal switch constantly measure the transverse and longitudinal acceleration of the car's body. The ADS uses this data to calculate the optimal damper setting for each wheel independently and transmits the relevant signals to the valves on the shock absorbers. It is comprised of a number of different components interconnected by pneumatic pipes and a CAN (controller area network) databus. It includes pneumatic suspension struts at the front and rear, compressor, central reservoir, air spring valves, electronic control unit, and various sensors. Vehicle mass is supported by the compressed air in the rubber bellows of the pneumatic suspension struts. Level control is achieved by adding or releasing compressed air from the struts. Two yaw rate sensors — one on the front axle and one on the rear axle — supply the information to the control unit. This system can also be used to adjust the height of the vehicle.

The front axle of the vehicle has a four-link system of aluminum and steel in place of the previous double wishbone suspension. There are four key components to this system:

  • Spring links are positioned transversally to the direction of travel and support the damper struts on the front axle and are jointed to the stabilizer.
  • Torque struts are oriented at a slanting angle forward and optimize front wheel location.
  • Upper wishbones are constructed of aluminum and are positioned above the lower link plane and are used for wheel location.

Track rods are front axle components that are integral to the rack and pinion steering system.

The separation of the previous lower wishbone into spring link and torque strut has a positive effect on the overall kinematics of the axle.

The rear suspension is the Daimler-Benz multi-link independent suspension. One change to this suspension was the relocation of the damper strut to help alleviate vibration. In this five-link design, four of the links are transverse — to distribute all of the forces on the rear wheels evenly — while the fifth, the track rod, is longitudinal. The suspension locates the drive wheels accurately so that there are virtually no toe angle changes and, as a result, no unwanted rear-wheel throttle steering.

The five speed automatic transmission not only adapts to the individual's driving style but also to changes in road grade by delaying upshifts on ascents for climbing power and downshifting on descents for engine braking. It also offers two different drive modes, one that is full automatic and one in which the driver can nudge the gearshift to change gears (when permitted by the electronic control unit).

The rack and pinion steering provides a variable ratio and speed-sensitive power assist, both for responsive road feel at speed and light steering during slow speed maneuvers such as parking. This vehicle also has a smart cruise control system, which can automatically maintain a preset distance behind the car in front with the help of a radar sensor.

Eight airbags are employed in this vehicle — one for the driver and passenger in the front, four door-mounted side airbags, and two curtain type airbags that deploy from the headliner to offer protection from the A-pillar to the C-pillar. The front passenger airbag uses smart airbag technology, which means it has a two stage gas generator to inflate the bag according to severity of the collision. A transponder is also used to detect the presence of a BabySmart-compatible child seat and deactivate the front passenger airbag.

Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.