Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Global Vehicles

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Frankfurt Motor Show: Will getting more into less become more out of less?

The art of automotive product packaging is a complex, multifunctional design and engineering discipline that has led to cars with relatively small overall dimensions yet remarkable interior space.

by Stuart Birch, European Editor

At this year's Frankfurt Motor Show, the trend of more into less was epitomized by the Ford Fiesta, which can provide near-Focus levels of passenger space within a smaller overall footprint. This is good news in a European market that has been steadily downsizing but still aims to retain the head and leg room along with general levels of comfort provided by larger vehicles. To achieve better packaging, engineering philosophies and design—from compact transverse front-wheel-drive systems to twistbeam rear axles—have been applied to squeeze all available space from compact vehicles. Ironically, overall downsizing has led to an increase in the size of many cars in specific segments to meet consumer expectations, showing that there is a limit to how much engineering can challenge the laws of mobile real estate. Thus, smaller cars have become subtly larger in terms of length and width and particularly in height.

The Focus is a classic example. It may be space efficient with handling that approaches sports-car levels of response, but it is a tall car with an H-point well above the mid-1990s norm. Other manufacturers' products are moving in the same direction. The expectancy of more space is not just confined to small cars. The fundamental trend is also well established in other segments in the U.S., Asia, and Europe, although the way in which it is addressed may differ. Customer requirement for ever-increasing space currently shows no sign of varying; however, this trend may change for legislative and technology reasons. Although the automotive industry has demonstrated remarkable competence in meeting very tough legislative requirements, it could be that by about 2008 as requirements for CO2 emissions levels in particular reach very low figures, technological solutions will have to be assisted by physical changes. In other words, the recent trend toward "larger small cars" so evident at Frankfurt may be reversed.

"The necessity to reduce CO2 emissions, particularly our commitment to achieve a 140-g/km (225-g/mi) fleet average by 2008, will definitely put pressure on manufacturers to possibly move toward a downsizing trend," said Martin Leach, Vice President, Product Development, Ford of Europe. "It is always difficult if the customers want to go 'left' and the regulations ask you to go 'right.' It becomes a complex balancing act. There are technological advances to help achieve this (balance), but based on what we can see at the moment, they are not enough. The targets are very stringent and require technology in large measures—plus probably some fleet downsizing as well."

Of course, the element that could change significantly the future of the automotive industry is the fuel cell. While progress is undoubtedly being made toward improved packaging and manufacturing solutions (as reported by AEI, GM is aiming to put a million fuel-cell vehicles on the road by the end of the decade), the fuel-cell issue is complicated, and it may be some years before the picture becomes totally clear.

At least, that was the likely situation immediately before the Frankfurt Motor Show. But the tragic events that occurred in New York, Washington, and Pennsylvania as the show opened may change all this. The political, social, and economic developments that might ensue could put a very different emphasis on the direction and pace of emerging automotive technology and mobility. It remains too early to reach any positive conclusions or to confidently interpret any early indications. However, the automotive industry must now overlay its advancing technological capability not only with the need to meet expected environmental legislation, but also with an understanding and anticipation of possible global economic, sociopolitical changes. These changes may challenge every aspect of the design, engineering, and manufacturing capability necessary to achieve new levels of efficiency and environmental and resources conservation.

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Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.