Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Global Viewpoints
Shrinking electric cars


Nissan offers the Hypermini two-seat EV to the Japanese public.


The Hypermini's lithium-ion battery pack.


Toyota built a fleet of 50 e-Com EVs for inner city, community trials.


One of the e-Com depots in Toyota City where the mini EV may be rented.


Honda's ICVS program includes a small fleet of the City Pal in its Motegi race track and automotive theme park complex.


Mitsubishi MEEV-II is a prototype two-seat EV for inner community use.


The MEEV-II's aluminum body structure.


The MEEV-II lithium-ion battery pack.

Several Japanese auto manufacturers are now turning their attention from normal-size (four/five-seat) electric cars to two-seat mini "community" runabouts.

For the former category, Honda delivered its Civic-platform-derived EV-Plus to 300 lease customers in the U.S. and 15 in Japan. EV-Plus production at the Takanezawa special-vehicle plant (which also produces the all-aluminum NSX supercar, the S2000 roadster, and the Insight gasoline/electric hybrid) ceased in spring of 1999. Nissan produced 60 Altra EVs for American customers and 3 Renessa EVs for Japan, and likewise wrapped up the program. Toyota is pressing on with the RAV4-based EV, of which about 330 units have been delivered since its introduction in 1995.

A new crop of micro EVs are intended for vehicle sharing within urban and suburban communities, with a number of such experimental projects being planned by OEMs and municipal agencies. Nissan launched a most ambitious plan with its Hypermini micro car, in contrast to its cautious entry in the increasingly competitive ICE/electric hybrid segment. Its initial sales plan of 150 units is a drop in the electric pond, yet it is the largest in the micro segment, and Nissan is the first company to announce the price: 4 million ($38,500 at a $1 to 104 exchange rate) per vehicle, including a recharging unit. Because of this high price for its diminutive size and limited people and luggage capacity, it is primarily intended for fleet buyers, such as government, municipal, and corporate community transportation operators and planners.

The Hypermini measures only 2665 mm (105 in) long, 1475 mm (58 in) wide, and 1550 mm (61 in) tall on an 1890-mm (74-in) wheelbase and 1290/1270-mm (51/50-in) tracks. The vehicle's mass is 840 kg (1850 lb). Dimensionally it falls in the Japanese "kei" (light) car category, receiving a favorable annual automobile tax rate, and is street-legal. It is driven by a rear-mounted ac synchronous motor employing a neodymium magnet rated at maximum output of 24 kW (32 hp) and 130 N•m (96 lb•ft) and revving up to 6700 rpm. The motor drives the rear wheels via a single-speed reduction geartrain. Four lithium-ion batteries are placed under the cabin floor, providing 90 A•h. The battery's energy density, 90 W•h/kg (41 W•h/lb), is three times a typical lead-acid type's and 1.5 times that of the nickel/metal-hydride (MH) variety, and it is immune from "memory effects" that may lower output, according to Nissan. The standard small inductive charger charges the battery in four hours from a 200-V ac outlet. Nissan claims a top speed of 100 km/h (62 mph) and a range of 115 km (71 mi) on the Japanese urban 10/15 driving cycle on a fully charged battery.

The chassis features electrically assisted rack and pinion steering, all disc brakes, front and rear strut-type suspension, and 145/65R-14 tires. The Hypermini's state of readiness may be checked by a remote transmitter/receiver unit, which displays the vehicle's charge state, battery level, and enables the owner/operator to set recharge time and to pre-cool or -heat the cabin by switching on the HVAC unit.

Toyota operates a fleet of 30 e-Com electric two-seat runabouts in Toyota City. The e-Com is a light vehicle accommodating two people and some luggage in its closed three-door body. The vehicle is 2790 mm (110 in) long, 1475 mm (58 in) wide, and 1605 mm (63 in) tall on an 1800-mm (71-in) wheelbase, and has a mass of 770 kg (1700 lb) at the curb. It is powered by an ac synchronous motor of 18.5 kW (25 hp) and 76 N•m (56 lb•ft) output, driving the front wheels via a single-speed reduction gearbox. The battery pack is a nickel/MH type, providing a maximum range of 100 km (62 mi) on the urban 10/15 cycle on a full charge. A conductive charger replenishes the battery pack, which requires 2.5 h on a 200-V ac outlet and nine hours on the home appliance 100-V ac outlet.

An additional fleet of 20 e-Coms is rented to the Tama New Town experimental community transportation project near Tokyo. Honda runs 15 City Pal two-seat electric cars in the ICVS (intelligent community vehicle system) experiment at the Mote complex, which includes two international size race tracks, driving training facilities, museum, educational laboratory, and even a short landing strip for acrobatic aircraft. The City Pal is the largest vehicle in the ICVS fleet.

Mitsubishi has recently joined the micro EV fray with the MEEV-II, short for Mitsubishi Eco electric vehicle, series II, which made its appearance at a recent Japanese Ministry of Transport-sponsored gathering of such vehicles in Tokyo. It may be the series II, but according to a Mitsubishi insider only one prototype exists, with no firm plan to produce more.

The MEEV-II features an extruded aluminum spaceframe clad in a thermoplastic outer body. The front wheels are driven by an ac permanent-magnet, synchronous motor, whose propulsion energy is supplied from a lithium-ion battery pack housed under the cabin floor. The two-seat car is 2600 mm (102 in) long, 1480 mm (58 in) wide, and 1630 mm (64 in) tall, and has a mass of 640 kg (1410 lb). Mitsubishi claims a top speed of over 80 km/h (50 mph), which is the legal maximum speed for light vehicles in Japan, and a range of 145 km (90 mi) on a full charge. Battery fill-up requires 4.5 h from a 200-V ac outlet.

Jack Yamaguchi

AEI June 2000

Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.