Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Global Viewpoints
From 507 to Z8



The initial styling of the BMW Z8 was carried out in California, before development in Germany.


The interior styling of the BMW Z8.



BMW Z8's xenon headlights use a light arc and have automatic range control.


A BMW 507 owned by BMW GB.


A view under the BMW Z8's hood.

Retro automotive styling allied to state-of-the-art technology tends to result in either great marketing success or sorry failure. So when BMW decided to create the powerful and costly aluminum Z8 two-seat, V8-engined sports car as a modern day echo of the 1950s' V8 507 and give it design cues that also echoed the styling of each of the intervening decades, the result could have been a confusing amalgam. In fact the man who styled the 507, Albrecht Graf Goertz, said of BMW's new model, "If I were to design the 507 today, it would look like the Z8."

BMW's Designworks/USA carried out initial styling of the Z8 at its Newbury Park, CA, studios before development began in Germany. The car was seen originally as the Z07 concept at the 1997 Tokyo Motor Show. The Z8 is semi-hand-built with a monocoque aluminum spaceframe using extrusion-pressed profiles. It is built largely in-house and is providing the company with specialist knowledge in the use of aluminum. At a production shop at the Dingolfing plant, the pre-processed extrusion-pressed profiles and the aluminum panels obtained from suppliers are put together to create the spaceframe. Aluminum is also used for the Z8's suspension. The hardtop for the BMW 3 Series and the hood for the 7 Series are currently produced at Dingolfing's Aluminum Processing Center

A double-joint spring strut axle with track control arms and tie-rods at the front and the rear of the Z8 comprise a multi-arm design with an anti-roll bar patented by BMW. As well as weight saving, BMW said the use of aluminum was also appropriate for the Z8 because it is a small production series and a steel structure would not have been economically viable. The Z8's 5.0-L engine produces 294 kW (394 hp) and 500 Nm (369 lbft) of torque. The unit is also used in the M5 sedan. It has variable camshaft adjustment (double VANOS) and an intake system with electronically controlled individual throttle butterflies. The engine is placed well behind the front axle line in what BMW terms a "front mid-engine" configuration to provide a 50:50 weight balance. Dynamic stability control (DSC) is fitted. The transmission is a six-speed manual with a self-adjusting, single dry plate clutch. Performance figures include a 0-100 km/h (0-62 mph) time of 4.7 s. Brakes are two-piston swing caliper discs at the front and single-piston swing caliper discs at the rear. They were developed from the system used on the 750i sedan.

The Z8's exterior styling successfully melds traditional and modern. Although it has some cues from the 507, it has more of the 1960s about it than the 1950s, particularly from the rear. The interior is particularly striking, with a high-gloss dashboard and aluminum minor controls. Interior trim is in leather, as is the tonneau cover. The steering wheel has aluminum spokes and leather rim. Steering column adjustment is powered, but only longitudinally. A starter button is fitted. Main instruments are positioned centrally on the dashboard. The trunk has a capacity of 203 L (7.2 ft3).

Driving classic sports cars may sometimes be a disappointment; they can be slow, sloppy, loose-bodied, and uncohesive—but not the BMW 507. John Surtees, the only man to win world racing championships on both two and four wheels, allowed this AEI editor to drive his 507, which he has owned for 43 years. Like the Z8 it has a V8, but with a 3.2-L engine and a sharper "bark" to its sound under hard acceleration. It also has considerably less power—127 kW (170 hp). But it has remarkable torsional rigidity, sharp handling (double wishbones at the front with adjustable torsion bars and anti-roll bar; torsion bars and a Panhard rod at the rear) and a surprisingly good ride. The 507 has a steel ladder-frame chassis and aluminum body panels. Only 254 507s were built.

Driving a twice world champion in his own car valued at around $280,000 is a mind-focusing experience. But the 507 is remarkably user-friendly, despite its huge steering wheel. The all-synchromesh four-speed gearbox has a light and easy shift. Performance is brisk. "I once saw 238 km/h (148 mph) in Italy," Surtees said. "My car has more power than the standard 112-kW (150-hp) version and it also has disc brakes to all wheels that were not standard, either."

Surtees' ownership of his 507 was due to his racing prowess. "I had won the 1956 500cc World Motorcycle Championship on an MV Agusta," Surtees explained. "Count Agusta said he wanted to give me something as an extra prize for winning. I told him I would think it over. Soon after I saw a 507 at the Hockenheim race track, drove it, and told the Count that was what I wanted." The Count was somewhat taken aback—the 507 was an expensive car at about $4,960 before tax plus $192 for a detachable hardtop. This was at a time when a six-cylinder Ford Zephyr sedan was about $976 before tax. But an agreement was reached and Surtees has had the car ever since.

He used it to commute to race meetings from his London home. He could average 112 km/h (70 mph) between MV's headquarters in Gallarate, Italy, and London, long before Europe's complex of autostradas and autoroutes had been built. "We went over Alpine passes like the Simplon in those days before a tunnel. The 507 was great on mountain roads, but the brakes got a little hot." At the time, Dunlop was developing disc brakes for the front wheels of the 507; Surtees offered to help with that development and had them fitted to all the wheels on his car. The engine's power output was also raised. Surtees said each 507 cost BMW more money to build than it was sold for. "Each was like a hand-built car—something special. It still is."

Stuart Birch

AEI July 2000

Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.