Robert Ervin to Receive the 2004 SAE Delco Electronics Intelligent Transportation Systems Award

Robert ErvinWarrendale, PA (February 16, 2005) - - Robert Ervin, professor emeritus at the University of Michigan, has been selected to receive the 2004 SAE Delco Electronics Intelligent Transportation Systems Award. Ervin, along with one other recipient, will be presented with the award at the Honors Convocation during the SAE 2005 World Congress in Detroit, Michigan, April 2005.

This award recognizes the profound impact that Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) will have on mobility in the 21st century. Established in 1996, it distinguishes an individual or team whose outstanding technical accomplishment is judged to have significantly advanced state-of-the-art ITS. It may also recognize the author or authors of the best paper relating to the invention, design, construction, or operation of vehicle-related equipment or systems operating within an ITS context. The award is funded from an endowment contributed by Delco Electronics.

Ervin recently retired after a distinguished, thirty-five-year career at the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute. There he directed research on the dynamic process of motor vehicle control with an emphasis on crash avoidance technology. He is the co-founder of the university's Intelligent Transportation Systems program and served in many national and international capacities to promote meaningful research on applying technology to further advance safe driving.

Ervin has authored hundreds of technical papers and reports in the fields of vehicle dynamics, motor vehicle safety, and intelligent transportation systems. He has been active with SAE for many years. In 1992, he helped found the Society's ITS Program Office (now the ITS Division) and helped found Mobility 2000 in the late eighties, from which ITS America was formed. Ervin also served on several Transportation Research Board committees and special study groups of the USDOT. He holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Detroit and a master's from Cornell University, both in mechanical engineering.