Dr. Stephen J. Charlton to Present the 2005 L. Ray Buckendale Lecture

Dr. Stephen J. CharltonWarrendale, PA (September 2, 2005) - Dr. Stephen J. Charlton of Cummins Technical Center in Columbus, Indiana has been selected to present the L. Ray Buckendale Lecture during the 2005 Commercial Vehicle Engineering Congress & Exhibition, November 1-3, in Rosemont, Illinois. The presentation entitled, "Developing Diesel Engines to Meet Ultra-low Emission Standards," will take place on Thursday, November 3, in the Caterpillar Technology Theatre.

This award, established in 1953, provides for an annual lecture that deals with automotive ground vehicles for either on- or off-road operation in either commercial or military service. The intent is to provide procedures and data useful in formulating solutions in commercial vehicle design, manufacture, operation, and maintenance.

The award honors L. Ray Buckendale, 1946 SAE President, who, by his character and work, endeared himself to all who were associated with him. Foremost among his many interests was the desire to develop the potential abilities in young people. To this end, the lecture is directed primarily to the needs of young engineers and students with emphasis on practical aspects of the topic.

The 2005 Buckendale Lecture is sponsored by Dana Corporation. Sponsorship of the lecture rotates among companies within the commercial vehicle industry, including ArvinMeritor, Cummins, Dana, Eaton and TRW Automotive.

Dr. Charlton is responsible for the development of heavy-duty engines at Cummins Technical Center in Columbus, Indiana, where he is currently leading the development of new heavy-duty products. He has been with Cummins since 1993, initially working on combustion, performance, and emissions. In the late 1990s, he led the development of cooled EGR technology at Cummins and since 2000 has led the development of Cummins 2007 EPA heavy-duty products.

Prior to joining Cummins, Dr. Charlton was a professor at The University of Bath in the United Kingdom, where he taught thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and diesel engine technology at both undergraduate and graduate levels. There, he developed a significant research program focused on the development of emission controls for small passenger car diesel engines. He started his career with GEC Diesels Limited in the United Kingdom in the early 1970s.

Dr. Charlton has authored and co-authored over 75 technical papers and holds several patents on diesel engine technology. He holds a Ph.D. from Aston University in Birmingham, England.