SAE International to Aid Defense Industries in Standards Globalization

Warrendale, PA (March 10, 2005) - With the signing of an agreement, taxpayers got a break, procurement professionals breathed a sigh of relief and the defense industry took a major step forward toward the goal of global standardization.

The agreement signing ceremony, involving the NATO Standardization Agency, the American National Standards Institute, ASTM and SAE International, opened the 2005 Department of Defense Standardization Conference this week. Essentially, this agreement creates a larger pool of both customers and suppliers within the defense industries in the 26 nations of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

The benefits of common standards are many:

  • Taxpayers save money, because of reduced component variations, which in turn cut costs in military spending. (When components are unique to an entity, they tend to come at a premium price.)
  • Because the defense industry tends to function within a coalition of nations (and is poised to do so more in the future), inter-operability of parts, systems, processes and materials is key.
  • Logistics becomes more manageable.
  • Confidence and reliability are reassured regarding a product�s safety, reliability and performance.

While SAE International was started in 1905 in part as a forum to encourage standards, 100 years later, the mobility industry is still in the process of achieving the goal of global standardization.

Taking part in the signing at the Westfields Marriott Conference Center were:

Brigadier General J Maj, Director, NATO Standardization Agency; Raymond Morris, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, SAE International; Dr. Mark Hurwitz, President and Chief Executive Officer, American National Standards Institute; James Thomas, President, ASTM International.

Morris gave the keynote address, tracing SAE�s involvement with both the Department of Defense and its involvement in standards as they regard the mobility industries.