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Viewing 1 to 30 of 134
Article
2014-08-05
Airbus, British Airways (BA), Heathrow Airport (LHR), and NATS (the main air navigation service provider in the U.K.) have established a partnership to study and develop operational procedures to reduce the number of people affected by noise around London’s Heathrow.
Article
2014-06-19
Airbus Group and Safran are further strengthening their relationship to propose a new family of competitive, versatile, and efficient space launchers, to serve both commercial and institutional needs.
Article
2014-05-08
The first ever Airbus A350 XWB to visit the U.S., MSN2, arrived the second week in May at McKinley Climatic Lab at Eglin Air Force base in Florida. Over several weeks the aircraft and its various systems and cabin installations will be subjected to the extreme hot and cold temperatures that the facility can sustain in a testing environment.
Article
2014-03-10
Greater fuel efficiency and low emission requirements have grown into such an urgent imperative in aircraft design that it often overshadows an equally significant factor in air travel—noise. Airbus shows that it’s possible to infuse acoustic simulation into design processes from beginning to end, giving engineers the acoustic simulation intelligence they need to create quieter aircraft, according to Free Field Technologies.
Article
2014-02-24
Airbus and Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC) signed a memorandum of understanding to develop a mutual understanding on new air traffic management concepts and operations as defined in the ICAO Global Air Navigation Plan.
Article
2014-01-02
Airbus signed a memorandum of understanding with EGTS International, a joint-venture company between Safran and Honeywell Aerospace, to further develop and evaluate an autonomous electric pushback and taxiing solution for the A320 Family.
Article
2013-10-04
Assembly of large and complex carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) components requires the use of liquid resin-based materials for applications such as shimming and aerodynamic sealing. These materials generally require curing times up to 12 h; heated air technology can reduce that time to 2 h.
Article
2013-09-18
Rising system complexity and shortened development cycles have led to the need for an extension of the existing, classical test methods. The Airbus High Lift Test Department is pursuing virtual testing as an additional, equivalent test means besides existing, established physical means of compliance.
Technical Paper
2013-09-17
Valérie Berger
Airbus business and Extended Enterprise require more and more involvement of design and built suppliers, tier 1 but also across the complete supply chain i.e. tier 2-n. These suppliers are not working only for Aerospace industry and may have different cultures. The pressure on cost and overall efficiency is high and everybody has to cope with obsolescence and new regulation (e.g. REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals)). So it became very important for Airbus to clarify the criteria under which a change can be done without Airbus review, and criteria under which a change can be done without Airworthiness authority review. This document details the Airbus recommendations and requirements to ensure full compliance with Part 21 to Airbus (and suppliers) with regards to: Change to Aircraft Type Design Change to Aircraft Type Design identification Change to Aircraft Type Design identification assessment This covers the complete scope of the detail design of the Aircraft.
Article
2013-04-19
Airbus has begun construction of the company’s A320 Family Assembly Line in Mobile, AL. The new assembly line, which is the company’s first U.S.-based production facility, will be located at the Mobile Brookley Aeroplex and will facilitate assembly of A319, A320, and A321 aircraft.
Article
2012-07-06
Airbus has announced plans to establish a manufacturing facility in the United States to assemble and deliver the family of A319, A320, and A321 aircraft. Located at the Brookley Aeroplex in Mobile, AL, it will be the company's first U.S.
Article
2012-05-31
Researchers from Brötje-Automation and Airbus come up with a “versatile” solution.
Video
2012-03-23
In Aeronautic industry, when we launch a new industrialization for an aircraft sub assembly we always have the same questions in mind for drilling operations, especially when focusing on lean manufacturing. How can we avoid dismantling and deburring parts after drilling operation? Can a drilling centre perform all the tasks needed to deliver a hole ready to install final fastener? How can we decrease down-time of the drilling centre? Can a drilling centre be integrated in a pulse assembly line? How can we improve environmental efficiency of a drilling centre? It is based on these main drivers that AIRBUS has developed, with SPIE and SOS, a new generation of drilling centre dedicated for hard materials such as titanium, and high thicknesses. The first application was for the assembly of the primary structure of A350 engine pylons. The main solution that was implemented meeting several objectives was the development of orbital drilling technology in hard metal stacks. Indeed, like in other materials (CFRP, Aluminum) this drilling process provides a lot of advantages.
Article
2011-11-03
In the automotive industry, the industrial robot is a common solution to achieve high-speed, repeatable processes. But due to its lack of accuracy and its compliant nature, use of robots has not been as successful in aircraft manufacturing. The use of force control with robots could change that.
Article
2011-10-20
Due to the conflicting trends of increasing complexity of systems and drastically reduced development times, virtual testing has become one of the solutions to achieve aircraft system certification.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
David Ernesto Funes Sebastian
A methodology to evaluate the sensitivity of total pressure intake distortion descriptors defined by SAE ARP 1420 to individual pressure fluctuations in the Aerodynamic Interface Plane -AIP- has been developed. Individual pressure fluctuations were simulated as a white noise using a random number generator with a Gaussian distribution of known standard deviation. Monte Carlo experiments were performed perturbing different steady total pressure patterns on the AIP with random signals of different RMS values. Instantaneous distortion descriptors were calculated and statistically characterized. General correlations were obtained applying maximum value statistics to relate the maximum expected distortion increment to the RMS of the individual pressure fluctuations, the mean total pressure on the AIP and the number of samples.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Stephen Tomlinson, Matt Barker, Darran Venn, Luke Hickson, Joseph Kah-Wah Lam
Water is a contaminant that can lead to fuel system icing, microbial contamination, corrosion and fuel quantity gauging problems and therefore an efficient water management system is required in order to maximise the performance of an aircraft's fuel system. This paper describes a time-transient aircraft fuel tank model with water contamination, due to the principal mechanisms of dissolution, suspension, condensation and transportation. The tank model presented is a component of the NEPTUNE fuel system model which was developed for Airbus using the A380 as an example aircraft. A description of the physics of water contaminated fuel is given and of how this has been incorporated into a mathematical model of an aircraft fuel tank. A modular approach is demonstrated which enables interconnecting fuel tanks to be configured in larger systems in a flexible and easily understood manner.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Richard Ambroise
Four years ago Airbus became actively involved in the SAE E36, Electronic Engine Control committee. This paper presents an Airframe Manufacturer view of one current working practices discussion relative to the FADEC electrical hardware change and describes an Airframe Manufacturer views on the committee's effectiveness along with a vision for its future. The SAE E36 committee is a representation of the propulsion control engineering community. The members comes from Airworthiness Authorities and other government and military agencies, airframers, engine manufacturers and control suppliers from North America, South America and Europe (including Russia). An active involvement allows an aircraft manufacturer to participate actively in the process and “to set the standard”. An additional benefit is to be aware of “what's hot”. Technical meetings provide the opportunity to debate on emerging regulatory change and technology trends with experts from organisations which span from small aircraft to large, crossing the civil and military domain.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Otto Jan Bakker, Nirosh Jayaweera, Oliver Martin, Andrew Turnock, Peter Helgosson, Tony Smith, Atanas Popov, Svetan Ratchev, David Tomlinson, Jon Wright, Mark Summers
The aerospace manufacturing sector is continuously seeking automation due to increased demand for the next generation single-isle aircraft. In order to reduce weight and fuel consumption aircraft manufacturers have increasingly started to use more composites as part of the structure. The manufacture and assembly of composites poses different constraints and challenges compared to the more traditional aircraft build consisting of metal components. In order to overcome these problems and to achieve the desired production rate existing manufacturing technologies have to be improved. New technologies and build concepts have to be developed in order to achieve the rate and ramp up of production and cost saving. This paper investigates how to achieve the rib hole key characteristic (KC) in a composite wing box assembly process. When the rib hole KC is out of tolerances, possibly, the KC can be achieved by imposing it by means of adjustable tooling and fixturing elements. A test rig has been designed and built that is used to experimentally investigate the capability of both the tooling and fixturing concepts.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Lutz Deitert
During mechanical assembly, individual parts are joined by different types of fasteners which are commonly to be installed into tightly tolerated holes. Drilling of widely used modern materials like CFRP and titanium leads to challenges in terms of tool and process development. A significant challenge is one step drilling in assemblies made from mixed material stacks. It results in deviating hole diameters making the additional reaming operation essential.”But also drilling of thick single material stacks imposes difficulties in terms of hole tolerance, chip extraction, heat accumulation and lubrication issues, leading to the necessity of drilling in several steps to achieve the required hole quality and integrity. During orbital drilling the drive spindle rotates eccentrically in addition to tool rotation and feed movement, leading to a circular path of the cutting tool. Orbital drilling can offer advantages compared with conventional drilling and reaming. The eccentricity can be set steplessly even during the drilling process which allows to drill different hole diameters with one tool, tapered holes, change diameter within the hole or to perform a finishing cut during the tool return stroke.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Jean-Pierre Cachelet
This paper proposes a rearview on aeronautical innovation, addresses some 2000-2010 new products, and suggests elements of future vision, serving passengers aspirations. Over 100 years, aeronautics brilliantly domesticated flight: feasibility, safety, efficiency, international travel, traffic volume and noise, allowing airlines to run a business, really connecting real people. Despite some maturations, new developments should extend the notion of passenger service. So far, turbofans became silent and widebodies opened ‘air-bus’ travel for widespread business, tourism or education. Today airports symbolize cities and vitalize regional economies. 2000-2010 saw the full double-decker, the new eco-friendly freighter and electronic ticketing. In technology, new winglets and neo classical engines soon will save short-range blockfuel. In systems and maintenance, integrated modular avionics and onboard data systems give new flexibility, incl by data links to ground. In cabins, silence and adaptation to passenger preferences become a must.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Pascal Ple, Florian David, Jean-Francois Gabory, Damien Van Damme
In Aeronautic industry, when we launch a new industrialization for an aircraft sub assembly we always have the same questions in mind for drilling operations, especially when focusing on lean manufacturing. How can we avoid dismantling and deburring parts after drilling operation? Can a drilling centre perform all the tasks needed to deliver a hole ready to install final fastener? How can we simplify specific jigs used to maintain parts during drilling operations? How can we decrease down-time of the drilling centre? Can a drilling centre be integrated in a pulse assembly line? How can we improve environmental efficiency of a drilling centre? It is based on these main drivers that AIRBUS has developed, with SPIE and SOS, a new generation of drilling centre dedicated for hard materials such as titanium, and high thicknesses. The first application was for the assembly of the primary structure of A350 engine pylons. The main solution that was implemented meeting several objectives was the development of orbital drilling technology in hard metal stacks.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Peter Lunt, Andrew Levers
Rising energy costs and increased regulation in recent years have caused industrialists to investigate how to apply ‘energy efficiency’ to their manufacturing operations. As well as reducing operating costs, the benefits of a ‘green’ image as a market differentiator are beginning to be realised. The literature describes the successful implementation of a variety of approaches to energy reduction, with particular focus on energy intensive industries (such as foundries) and on improvements to building services (such as lighting). However, a systematic approach to applying sustainable practices to the manufacturing processes involved in the production of high value products, such as aircraft, is noticeably absent. This paper describes how a number of sustainable manufacturing approaches have been combined, enhanced and applied to the shop floor of a manufacturing facility in the UK responsible for the production of large component assemblies for the aerospace industry. The focus is on reducing the energy consumption of manufacturing processes, although the approaches may be equally applicable to building services.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Hubertus Lohner, Isabelle Delay-Saunders, Karsten Hesse, Alexis Martinet, Martin Beneke, Pawandeep Kalyan, Benedikt Langer
Due to the importance of fulfilling the actual and upcoming environmental legislation, it is an Airbus main target to develop eco-efficient materials. Under consideration of the economical effects, these processes will be implemented into the production line. This paper gives an overview of Airbus and its partners research work, the results obtained within the frame of the European funded, integrated technology demonstrator (ITD) ECO Design for Airframe. This ITD is part of the joint technology initiative Clean Sky. Developments with different grade of maturity from “upstream” as the investigation of materials from renewable recourses up to materials now in use in production as low volatile organic compounds cleaner are under investigation. As a basis for future eco-efficient developments an approach for a quantitative life cycle assessment will be demonstrated.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Marie Jonsson, Andreas Stolt, Anders Robertsson, Thomas Murray, Klas Nilsson
Automation in aerospace industry is often in the form of dedicated solutions and focused on processes like drilling, riveting etc. The common industrial robot has due to limitations in positional accuracy and stiffness often been unsuitable for aerospace manufacturing. One major cost driver in aircraft manufacturing is manual assembly and the bespoke tooling needed. Assembly tasks frequently involve setting relations between parts rather than a global need for accuracy. This makes assembly a suitable process for the use of force control. With force control a robot equipped with needed software and hardware, searches for desired force rather than for a position. To test the usefulness of force control for aircraft assembly an experimental case aligning a compliant rib to multiple surfaces was designed and executed. The system used consisted of a standard ABB robot and an open controller and the assembly sequence was made up of several steps in order to achieve final position. The result shows that the process is robust and repetitive and has the potential to reduce the need for bespoke jigs and fixtures.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Gernot Ladstaetter, Nicolas Reichert, Thomas Obert
Over the last few years, IT systems have quickly found their way onboard aircrafts, driven by the continuous pursuit of improved safety and efficiency in aircraft operation, but also in an attempt to provide the ultimate in-flight experience for passengers. Along with IT systems and communication links came IT security as a new factor in the equation when evaluating and monitoring the operational risk that needs to be managed during the operation of the aircraft. This is mainly due to the fact that security deficiencies can cause services to be unavailable, or even worse, to be exploited by intentional attacks or inadvertent actions. Aircraft manufacturers needed to develop new processes and had to get organized accordingly in order to efficiently and effectively address these new risks. To achieve this, the operational constraints of the aircraft needed to be taken into consideration since classical incident response and patching principles do not apply to the administration of aircraft systems.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Geoffroy Roblot, Cédric Baumann, Patrick Guerin
With the last generation of large aircraft, the electrical needs have increased to reach a power close to 1MW. A power increase directly impacts one of the prominent criterions in aircraft design process: weight. Therefore, designers face the challenge to reduce generation while the power demand is increasing. The proposed paper details a methodology based on statistical approach to estimate the electrical consumption of an electrical network. Moreover, the modeling proposed in this paper allows taking into account peaks defined by their power and duration. Based on in-service measurements on commercial aircraft flights, this study proposes two methods to estimate electrical consumption of an electrical network. The first method is described. Based on modeling thanks to an efficient clustering, a Monte Carlo simulation is performed on all the loads to estimate the electrical power on the network with relevant results. As the generator has an overload capability during a known time, the second method proposed calls in an enhanced model in order to take into account duration aspects.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Matthew Walton, Philip Webb, Mike Poad
Significant effort has been applied to the introduction of automation for the structural assembly of aircraft. However, the equipping of the aircraft with internal services such as hydraulics, fuel, bleed-air and electrics and the attachment of movables such as ailerons and flaps remains almost exclusively manual and little research has been directed towards it. The problem is that the process requires lengthy assembly methods and there are many complex tasks which require high levels of dexterity and judgement from human operators. The parts used are prone to tolerance stack-ups, the tolerance for mating parts is extremely tight (sub-millimetre) and access is very poor. All of these make the application of conventional automation almost impossible. A possible solution is flexible metrology assisted collaborative assembly. This aims to optimise the assembly processes by using a robot to position the parts whilst an operator performs the fixing process. Parts are measured prior to positioning, with datum locations on both parts and counter parts processed using a best-fit algorithm to balance misalignment.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Björn Annighöfer, Erik Stallkamp, Frank Thielecke
Development for the Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) platform is complex owing to the variety of equipment, vendors and non-uniform tools. The development should be simplified by a model-based harmonized tool environment by means of an integrated set of tools of different type, origin and purpose. Eclipse's flexible and modular architecture seems adequate as a framework for such a harmonized IMA development environment. This article evaluates how Eclipse could practically be utilized for this purpose. The IMA process and development requirements like concurrency, different process roles, and multiple tools are mapped to the Eclipse framework. In addition, open-source extensions for model-based engineering and application development are integrated in the tools chain. In order to test the performance, openness and compatibility of Eclipse and the tools from the IMA development process, six current and future tools are integrated into a prototype of a common Eclipse instance. The integration covers a common human-machine interface (HMI) and model-based data exchange.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Benjamin Chouvion, Atanas Popov, Svetan Ratchev, Carl Mason, Mark Summers
Gaps between structural components have been a common problem since the start of aviation. This has usually been caused by the manufacturing tolerances of the components in question not being sufficiently tight. An example where such issues arise is in the assembly of a wing skin to rib feet to form an aircraft wing-box, where it is commonly found that, whilst some rib feet are in contact with the wing skin, others are spaced from it. Yet a strong connection between the wing skin and the rib feet is important to maintain the structural strength of the wing-box. To eliminate the existing gaps, the current approach, used in many manufacturing production lines, involves filling in the gaps to the required shape by applying liquid or solid shim to the rib feet. This is a relatively long and expensive process. To overcome these current inherent difficulties in interface management, a method to eliminate the shimming requirement between component interfaces is presented. It is achieved by developing automated methods and processes that remove a known excess of material from the appropriate interfaces using sophisticated rapid metrology techniques and advanced equipments such as gantry mounted robots, NC machines, or local rapid-machining centres.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 134

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