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Viewing 1 to 30 of 135
2014-10-02
Article
With its European base and global presence, it would only make sense that Airbus would take a leading role in the EU’s CleanSky 2, a joint technology initiative that is the follow-up to the CleanSky aerospace research program.
2014-08-05
Article
Airbus, British Airways (BA), Heathrow Airport (LHR), and NATS (the main air navigation service provider in the U.K.) have established a partnership to study and develop operational procedures to reduce the number of people affected by noise around London’s Heathrow.
2014-06-19
Article
Airbus Group and Safran are further strengthening their relationship to propose a new family of competitive, versatile, and efficient space launchers, to serve both commercial and institutional needs.
2014-05-08
Article
The first ever Airbus A350 XWB to visit the U.S., MSN2, arrived the second week in May at McKinley Climatic Lab at Eglin Air Force base in Florida. Over several weeks the aircraft and its various systems and cabin installations will be subjected to the extreme hot and cold temperatures that the facility can sustain in a testing environment.
2014-03-10
Article
Greater fuel efficiency and low emission requirements have grown into such an urgent imperative in aircraft design that it often overshadows an equally significant factor in air travel—noise. Airbus shows that it’s possible to infuse acoustic simulation into design processes from beginning to end, giving engineers the acoustic simulation intelligence they need to create quieter aircraft, according to Free Field Technologies.
2014-02-24
Article
Airbus and Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC) signed a memorandum of understanding to develop a mutual understanding on new air traffic management concepts and operations as defined in the ICAO Global Air Navigation Plan.
2014-01-02
Article
Airbus signed a memorandum of understanding with EGTS International, a joint-venture company between Safran and Honeywell Aerospace, to further develop and evaluate an autonomous electric pushback and taxiing solution for the A320 Family.
2013-10-04
Article
Assembly of large and complex carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) components requires the use of liquid resin-based materials for applications such as shimming and aerodynamic sealing. These materials generally require curing times up to 12 h; heated air technology can reduce that time to 2 h.
2013-09-18
Article
Rising system complexity and shortened development cycles have led to the need for an extension of the existing, classical test methods. The Airbus High Lift Test Department is pursuing virtual testing as an additional, equivalent test means besides existing, established physical means of compliance.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2124
Valérie Berger
Airbus business and Extended Enterprise require more and more involvement of design and built suppliers, tier 1 but also across the complete supply chain i.e. tier 2-n. These suppliers are not working only for Aerospace industry and may have different cultures. The pressure on cost and overall efficiency is high and everybody has to cope with obsolescence and new regulation (e.g. REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals)). So it became very important for Airbus to clarify the criteria under which a change can be done without Airbus review, and criteria under which a change can be done without Airworthiness authority review.
2013-04-19
Article
Airbus has begun construction of the company’s A320 Family Assembly Line in Mobile, AL. The new assembly line, which is the company’s first U.S.-based production facility, will be located at the Mobile Brookley Aeroplex and will facilitate assembly of A319, A320, and A321 aircraft.
2012-07-06
Article
Airbus has announced plans to establish a manufacturing facility in the United States to assemble and deliver the family of A319, A320, and A321 aircraft. Located at the Brookley Aeroplex in Mobile, AL, it will be the company's first U.S.
2012-05-31
Article
Researchers from Brötje-Automation and Airbus come up with a “versatile” solution.
2012-03-23
Video
In Aeronautic industry, when we launch a new industrialization for an aircraft sub assembly we always have the same questions in mind for drilling operations, especially when focusing on lean manufacturing. How can we avoid dismantling and deburring parts after drilling operation? Can a drilling centre perform all the tasks needed to deliver a hole ready to install final fastener? How can we decrease down-time of the drilling centre? Can a drilling centre be integrated in a pulse assembly line? How can we improve environmental efficiency of a drilling centre? It is based on these main drivers that AIRBUS has developed, with SPIE and SOS, a new generation of drilling centre dedicated for hard materials such as titanium, and high thicknesses. The first application was for the assembly of the primary structure of A350 engine pylons. The main solution that was implemented meeting several objectives was the development of orbital drilling technology in hard metal stacks.
2011-11-03
Article
In the automotive industry, the industrial robot is a common solution to achieve high-speed, repeatable processes. But due to its lack of accuracy and its compliant nature, use of robots has not been as successful in aircraft manufacturing. The use of force control with robots could change that.
2011-10-20
Article
Due to the conflicting trends of increasing complexity of systems and drastically reduced development times, virtual testing has become one of the solutions to achieve aircraft system certification.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2739
Peter Lunt, Andrew Levers
Rising energy costs and increased regulation in recent years have caused industrialists to investigate how to apply ‘energy efficiency’ to their manufacturing operations. As well as reducing operating costs, the benefits of a ‘green’ image as a market differentiator are beginning to be realised. The literature describes the successful implementation of a variety of approaches to energy reduction, with particular focus on energy intensive industries (such as foundries) and on improvements to building services (such as lighting). However, a systematic approach to applying sustainable practices to the manufacturing processes involved in the production of high value products, such as aircraft, is noticeably absent. This paper describes how a number of sustainable manufacturing approaches have been combined, enhanced and applied to the shop floor of a manufacturing facility in the UK responsible for the production of large component assemblies for the aerospace industry.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2729
Jean-Claude Derrien, Pierre Tieys, David Senegas, Michel Todeschi
1-ABSTRACT In the frame of the COVADIS project (flight control with distributed intelligence and systems integration) supported by the DPAC and where Airbus and Sagem are partners, an electromechanical actuator (EMA) developed and produced by Sagem (SAFRAN group) flew for the first time in January 2011 as an aileron primary flight control of the Airbus A320 flight test Aircraft. With this new type of actuator, in the scope of the preparation of the future Airbus Aircraft, the perspectives of using EMA technologies for the flight control systems is an important potential enabler in the more electrical aircraft. The paper deals with the development phase of this actuator from the definition phase up to the flight tests campaign. It is focused on : COVADIS project context (flight control with distributed intelligence and systems integration), The challenges of the definition phase, Test results presentation (ground and flight).
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2734
Marie Jonsson, Andreas Stolt, Anders Robertsson, Thomas Murray, Klas Nilsson
Automation in aerospace industry is often in the form of dedicated solutions and focused on processes like drilling, riveting etc. The common industrial robot has due to limitations in positional accuracy and stiffness often been unsuitable for aerospace manufacturing. One major cost driver in aircraft manufacturing is manual assembly and the bespoke tooling needed. Assembly tasks frequently involve setting relations between parts rather than a global need for accuracy. This makes assembly a suitable process for the use of force control. With force control a robot equipped with needed software and hardware, searches for desired force rather than for a position. To test the usefulness of force control for aircraft assembly an experimental case aligning a compliant rib to multiple surfaces was designed and executed. The system used consisted of a standard ABB robot and an open controller and the assembly sequence was made up of several steps in order to achieve final position.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2717
Gernot Ladstaetter, Nicolas Reichert, Thomas Obert
Over the last few years, IT systems have quickly found their way onboard aircrafts, driven by the continuous pursuit of improved safety and efficiency in aircraft operation, but also in an attempt to provide the ultimate in-flight experience for passengers. Along with IT systems and communication links came IT security as a new factor in the equation when evaluating and monitoring the operational risk that needs to be managed during the operation of the aircraft. This is mainly due to the fact that security deficiencies can cause services to be unavailable, or even worse, to be exploited by intentional attacks or inadvertent actions. Aircraft manufacturers needed to develop new processes and had to get organized accordingly in order to efficiently and effectively address these new risks.
2011-10-18
Journal Article
2011-01-2709
Sonja Straussberger, Florence Reuzeau
The vision of SESAR is to integrate and implement new technologies to improve air traffic management (ATM) performance. Enhanced automation and new separation modes characterize the future concept of operations, where the role of the human operator will remain central by integrating more managing and decision-making functions. The expected changes represent challenges for the human actors in the aircraft and on ground and must be taken into account during the development phase. Integrating the human in the ATM system development starting from the early design phase is a key factor for future acceptability. This paper describes the adaptation of currently applied Cockpit Human Factors processes in order to be able to design the aircraft for the future ATM environment.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2763
Hans-Gerd Giesseler
The Loads discipline contributes to the aircraft structural design by delivering shear, moment and torque (SMT, loads) all across the airframe resulting from application of aircraft airworthiness requirements as laid down in the CS 25/FAR 25 regulations and in some domestic ones. Loads computation considers the maneuver and gust conditions prescribed therein as well as other special design conditions. It is based on very detailed modeling, accounting for aerodynamics in all configurations, mass properties, flexibility of the airframe, flight control laws and retarded laws, hydraulic actuation, and specification of flight control system failure conditions. The resulting shear loads are processed and refined (e.g. nodal loads) and taken into account by the stress department for structural design.
2011-10-18
Journal Article
2011-01-2755
Cesar Serrano Velaz, Sophie Gourdon, Clement Chirol
There is an ever growing demand for blind fastener in the aerospace industry. This demand is driven not only by the advantages of single sided installation, but also by the potential to fully automate their installation process. Blind fasteners can easily be integrated with innovative end-effectors that combine drilling, installation and inspection systems, enabling the reduction of process cycle times and their associated cost savings. Clearly the advantages of single sided installation are a key benefit, but it cannot be forgotten that currently the mechanical performance of these systems is reduced compared with conventional threaded or swaged parallel shank fasteners. There are other important drawbacks existing around them which could penalise significantly the optimised design and performance of the structures. Specific key characteristics that take into account some of these drawbacks have been established by Airbus which will be referenced in this paper.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2761
Anne Gazaix, Pascal Gendre, Eric Chaput, Christophe Blondeau, Gérald Carrier, Peter Schmollgruber, Joel Brezillon, Thiemo Kier
The ACARE 2020 vision for commercial transport aircraft targets a 50% reduction per passenger kilometer in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions, with a 20-25% reduction to be achieved through airframe improvements. This step change in performance is dependent on the successful integration and down-selection of breakthrough technologies at early stage of aircraft development process, supported by advanced multidisciplinary design capabilities. Conceptual design capabilities, integrating more disciplines are routinely used at Future Project Office. The challenge considered here is to transition smoothly from conceptual to preliminary design whilst maintaining a true multidisciplinary approach. The design space must be progressively constrained, whilst at the same time increasing the level of modelling fidelity and keeping as many design options open for as long as possible.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2742
Hubertus Lohner, Isabelle Delay-Saunders, Karsten Hesse, Alexis Martinet, Martin Beneke, Pawandeep Kalyan, Benedikt Langer
Due to the importance of fulfilling the actual and upcoming environmental legislation, it is an Airbus main target to develop eco-efficient materials. Under consideration of the economical effects, these processes will be implemented into the production line. This paper gives an overview of Airbus and its partners research work, the results obtained within the frame of the European funded, integrated technology demonstrator (ITD) ECO Design for Airframe. This ITD is part of the joint technology initiative Clean Sky. Developments with different grade of maturity from “upstream” as the investigation of materials from renewable recourses up to materials now in use in production as low volatile organic compounds cleaner are under investigation. As a basis for future eco-efficient developments an approach for a quantitative life cycle assessment will be demonstrated.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2655
Matthew Walton, Philip Webb, Mike Poad
Significant effort has been applied to the introduction of automation for the structural assembly of aircraft. However, the equipping of the aircraft with internal services such as hydraulics, fuel, bleed-air and electrics and the attachment of movables such as ailerons and flaps remains almost exclusively manual and little research has been directed towards it. The problem is that the process requires lengthy assembly methods and there are many complex tasks which require high levels of dexterity and judgement from human operators. The parts used are prone to tolerance stack-ups, the tolerance for mating parts is extremely tight (sub-millimetre) and access is very poor. All of these make the application of conventional automation almost impossible. A possible solution is flexible metrology assisted collaborative assembly. This aims to optimise the assembly processes by using a robot to position the parts whilst an operator performs the fixing process.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2796
Volker Baumbach, Robert Behr, Gerhard Hummel
In the past decades hydraulic systems have dominated actuation tasks in aerospace applications. Even today hydraulic actuation remains in first line for primary flight controls as well as for heavy consumers such as landing gear or auxiliary applications in the perimeter of military functions. Also in future, hydraulic systems and its consumers are candidates to fulfil operational and functional requirements and provide respective improvements to ensure product competitiveness. Thus, this paper deals with potential improvements on hydraulic system level such as, fluid monitoring and light weight applications linked to impacts on aircraft level or interfacing systems.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2794
Liyun Lao, Colin Ramshaw, Hoi Yeung, Mark Carpenter, Janice Hetherington, Joseph Kah-Wah Lam, Sarah Barley
Experimental studies were performed to gain a better understanding of the behaviour of water in jet fuel at low temperatures. The transition of water in fuel from dissolved water to free water, and its subsequent precipitation behaviour when the fuel was cooled down, were investigated using a 20 litre glass-windowed aluminium tank. The effects of cooled internal surfaces were explored with chilled plates at the top and bottom of the aluminium tank. The tank was fitted with an array of thermocouples, which allowed horizontal and vertical temperature profiles to be measured. A laser visualisation system incorporating image processing software was used to capture images inside the simulated tank without interfering with the convective flow of the fuel. Fuel will precipitate any excess dissolved water when cooled below the saturation temperature. The excess water may then appear in the form of fine water droplets or ice particles as a fine cloud (fog).
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2805
Maxime Lastera, Eric Alata, Jean Arlat, Yves Deswarte, David Powell, Bertrand Leconte, Cristina Simache
Traditionally, software in avionics has been totally separated from open-world software, in order to avoid any interaction that could corrupt critical on-board systems. However, new aircraft generations need more interaction with off-board systems to offer extended services, which makes these information flows potentially dangerous. In a previous work, we have proposed the use of virtualization to ensure dependability of critical applications despite bidirectional communication between critical on-board systems and untrusted off-board systems. We have developed a test bed to assess the performance impact induced by the use of virtualization. In this work, various configurations have been experimented that range from a basic machine without an OS up to the complete architecture featuring a hypervisor and an OS running in a virtual machine. Several tests (computation, memory, network) are carried out, and timing measures are collected on different hypervisors.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2804
Philippe Goupil, Andres Marcos
The state-of-practice for aircraft manufacturers to diagnose guidance & control faults and obtain full flight envelope protection at all times is to provide high levels of dissimilar hardware redundancy. This ensures sufficient available control action and allows performing coherency tests, cross and consistency checks, voting mechanisms and built-in test techniques of varying sophistication. This hardware-redundancy based fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) approach is nowadays the standard industrial practice and fits also into current aircraft certification processes while ensuring the highest level of safety standards. In the context of future “sustainable” aircraft (More Affordable, Smarter, Cleaner and Quieter), the Electrical Flight Control System (EFCS) design objectives, originating from structural loads design constraints, are becoming more and more stringent.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 135

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