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Viewing 1 to 30 of 134
Article
2014-08-05
Airbus, British Airways (BA), Heathrow Airport (LHR), and NATS (the main air navigation service provider in the U.K.) have established a partnership to study and develop operational procedures to reduce the number of people affected by noise around London’s Heathrow.
Article
2014-06-19
Airbus Group and Safran are further strengthening their relationship to propose a new family of competitive, versatile, and efficient space launchers, to serve both commercial and institutional needs.
Article
2014-05-08
The first ever Airbus A350 XWB to visit the U.S., MSN2, arrived the second week in May at McKinley Climatic Lab at Eglin Air Force base in Florida. Over several weeks the aircraft and its various systems and cabin installations will be subjected to the extreme hot and cold temperatures that the facility can sustain in a testing environment.
Article
2014-03-10
Greater fuel efficiency and low emission requirements have grown into such an urgent imperative in aircraft design that it often overshadows an equally significant factor in air travel—noise. Airbus shows that it’s possible to infuse acoustic simulation into design processes from beginning to end, giving engineers the acoustic simulation intelligence they need to create quieter aircraft, according to Free Field Technologies.
Article
2014-02-24
Airbus and Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC) signed a memorandum of understanding to develop a mutual understanding on new air traffic management concepts and operations as defined in the ICAO Global Air Navigation Plan.
Article
2014-01-02
Airbus signed a memorandum of understanding with EGTS International, a joint-venture company between Safran and Honeywell Aerospace, to further develop and evaluate an autonomous electric pushback and taxiing solution for the A320 Family.
Article
2013-10-04
Assembly of large and complex carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) components requires the use of liquid resin-based materials for applications such as shimming and aerodynamic sealing. These materials generally require curing times up to 12 h; heated air technology can reduce that time to 2 h.
Article
2013-09-18
Rising system complexity and shortened development cycles have led to the need for an extension of the existing, classical test methods. The Airbus High Lift Test Department is pursuing virtual testing as an additional, equivalent test means besides existing, established physical means of compliance.
Technical Paper
2013-09-17
Valérie Berger
Airbus business and Extended Enterprise require more and more involvement of design and built suppliers, tier 1 but also across the complete supply chain i.e. tier 2-n. These suppliers are not working only for Aerospace industry and may have different cultures. The pressure on cost and overall efficiency is high and everybody has to cope with obsolescence and new regulation (e.g. REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals)). So it became very important for Airbus to clarify the criteria under which a change can be done without Airbus review, and criteria under which a change can be done without Airworthiness authority review. This document details the Airbus recommendations and requirements to ensure full compliance with Part 21 to Airbus (and suppliers) with regards to: Change to Aircraft Type Design Change to Aircraft Type Design identification Change to Aircraft Type Design identification assessment This covers the complete scope of the detail design of the Aircraft.
Article
2013-04-19
Airbus has begun construction of the company’s A320 Family Assembly Line in Mobile, AL. The new assembly line, which is the company’s first U.S.-based production facility, will be located at the Mobile Brookley Aeroplex and will facilitate assembly of A319, A320, and A321 aircraft.
Article
2012-07-06
Airbus has announced plans to establish a manufacturing facility in the United States to assemble and deliver the family of A319, A320, and A321 aircraft. Located at the Brookley Aeroplex in Mobile, AL, it will be the company's first U.S.
Article
2012-05-31
Researchers from Brötje-Automation and Airbus come up with a “versatile” solution.
Video
2012-03-23
In Aeronautic industry, when we launch a new industrialization for an aircraft sub assembly we always have the same questions in mind for drilling operations, especially when focusing on lean manufacturing. How can we avoid dismantling and deburring parts after drilling operation? Can a drilling centre perform all the tasks needed to deliver a hole ready to install final fastener? How can we decrease down-time of the drilling centre? Can a drilling centre be integrated in a pulse assembly line? How can we improve environmental efficiency of a drilling centre? It is based on these main drivers that AIRBUS has developed, with SPIE and SOS, a new generation of drilling centre dedicated for hard materials such as titanium, and high thicknesses. The first application was for the assembly of the primary structure of A350 engine pylons. The main solution that was implemented meeting several objectives was the development of orbital drilling technology in hard metal stacks. Indeed, like in other materials (CFRP, Aluminum) this drilling process provides a lot of advantages.
Article
2011-11-03
In the automotive industry, the industrial robot is a common solution to achieve high-speed, repeatable processes. But due to its lack of accuracy and its compliant nature, use of robots has not been as successful in aircraft manufacturing. The use of force control with robots could change that.
Article
2011-10-20
Due to the conflicting trends of increasing complexity of systems and drastically reduced development times, virtual testing has become one of the solutions to achieve aircraft system certification.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Jean-Claude Derrien, Pierre Tieys, David Senegas, Michel Todeschi
1-ABSTRACT In the frame of the COVADIS project (flight control with distributed intelligence and systems integration) supported by the DPAC and where Airbus and Sagem are partners, an electromechanical actuator (EMA) developed and produced by Sagem (SAFRAN group) flew for the first time in January 2011 as an aileron primary flight control of the Airbus A320 flight test Aircraft. With this new type of actuator, in the scope of the preparation of the future Airbus Aircraft, the perspectives of using EMA technologies for the flight control systems is an important potential enabler in the more electrical aircraft. The paper deals with the development phase of this actuator from the definition phase up to the flight tests campaign. It is focused on : COVADIS project context (flight control with distributed intelligence and systems integration), The challenges of the definition phase, Test results presentation (ground and flight).
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Michel Todeschi
A significant step is achieved on the flight control actuation system toward the more electrical aircraft through the Airbus A380, A400M and the A350 development phase ongoing. The A380/A400M/A350 features a mixed flight control actuation power source distribution, associating electrically powered actuators with conventional FlyByWire hydraulic servocontrols. In the scope of the preparation of the future Airbus Aircraft, this paper presents the perspectives of the use of the EMA technologies for the flight control systems in the more electrical aircraft highlighting the main technical challenges need to treat: jamming susceptibility, “on board” maintenance reduction, Operational reliability increase, power electronics and power management optimization, and regarding the environmental constraints, the predicted performances; the benefits associated to the optimized utilization of on-board power sources. On the 4th of January 2011, an aileron EMA was successful flown on Airbus A320 MSN1.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Marie Jonsson, Andreas Stolt, Anders Robertsson, Thomas Murray, Klas Nilsson
Automation in aerospace industry is often in the form of dedicated solutions and focused on processes like drilling, riveting etc. The common industrial robot has due to limitations in positional accuracy and stiffness often been unsuitable for aerospace manufacturing. One major cost driver in aircraft manufacturing is manual assembly and the bespoke tooling needed. Assembly tasks frequently involve setting relations between parts rather than a global need for accuracy. This makes assembly a suitable process for the use of force control. With force control a robot equipped with needed software and hardware, searches for desired force rather than for a position. To test the usefulness of force control for aircraft assembly an experimental case aligning a compliant rib to multiple surfaces was designed and executed. The system used consisted of a standard ABB robot and an open controller and the assembly sequence was made up of several steps in order to achieve final position. The result shows that the process is robust and repetitive and has the potential to reduce the need for bespoke jigs and fixtures.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Peter Lunt, Andrew Levers
Rising energy costs and increased regulation in recent years have caused industrialists to investigate how to apply ‘energy efficiency’ to their manufacturing operations. As well as reducing operating costs, the benefits of a ‘green’ image as a market differentiator are beginning to be realised. The literature describes the successful implementation of a variety of approaches to energy reduction, with particular focus on energy intensive industries (such as foundries) and on improvements to building services (such as lighting). However, a systematic approach to applying sustainable practices to the manufacturing processes involved in the production of high value products, such as aircraft, is noticeably absent. This paper describes how a number of sustainable manufacturing approaches have been combined, enhanced and applied to the shop floor of a manufacturing facility in the UK responsible for the production of large component assemblies for the aerospace industry. The focus is on reducing the energy consumption of manufacturing processes, although the approaches may be equally applicable to building services.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Hubertus Lohner, Isabelle Delay-Saunders, Karsten Hesse, Alexis Martinet, Martin Beneke, Pawandeep Kalyan, Benedikt Langer
Due to the importance of fulfilling the actual and upcoming environmental legislation, it is an Airbus main target to develop eco-efficient materials. Under consideration of the economical effects, these processes will be implemented into the production line. This paper gives an overview of Airbus and its partners research work, the results obtained within the frame of the European funded, integrated technology demonstrator (ITD) ECO Design for Airframe. This ITD is part of the joint technology initiative Clean Sky. Developments with different grade of maturity from “upstream” as the investigation of materials from renewable recourses up to materials now in use in production as low volatile organic compounds cleaner are under investigation. As a basis for future eco-efficient developments an approach for a quantitative life cycle assessment will be demonstrated.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Pascal Ple, Florian David, Jean-Francois Gabory, Damien Van Damme
In Aeronautic industry, when we launch a new industrialization for an aircraft sub assembly we always have the same questions in mind for drilling operations, especially when focusing on lean manufacturing. How can we avoid dismantling and deburring parts after drilling operation? Can a drilling centre perform all the tasks needed to deliver a hole ready to install final fastener? How can we simplify specific jigs used to maintain parts during drilling operations? How can we decrease down-time of the drilling centre? Can a drilling centre be integrated in a pulse assembly line? How can we improve environmental efficiency of a drilling centre? It is based on these main drivers that AIRBUS has developed, with SPIE and SOS, a new generation of drilling centre dedicated for hard materials such as titanium, and high thicknesses. The first application was for the assembly of the primary structure of A350 engine pylons. The main solution that was implemented meeting several objectives was the development of orbital drilling technology in hard metal stacks.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Tobias Ulmer
Improving the verification and certification process of the high lift system by introduction of virtual testing is one of the approaches to counter the challenges related to testing of future aircraft, in terms of performing more tests of more complex systems in less time. The quality of the applied modelling methods itself and the guarantee of a completely traceable simulation lifecycle management along the aircraft development are essential. The presentation shows how existing processes for the management of all test related data have to be extended to cover the specifics of using multi body simulation models for virtual tests related to high lift failure cases. Based on a demonstrator, MSC Software GmbH and Airbus developed and are still refining the SimManager based “High Lift System Virtual Test Portal”. This portal has to fulfil on the one side global requirements like data management, data traceability and workflow management. On the other hand, also specific requirements coming from the high lift test department have to be fulfilled.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Anne Gazaix, Pascal Gendre, Eric Chaput, Christophe Blondeau, Gérald Carrier, Peter Schmollgruber, Joel Brezillon, Thiemo Kier
The ACARE 2020 vision for commercial transport aircraft targets a 50% reduction per passenger kilometer in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions, with a 20-25% reduction to be achieved through airframe improvements. This step change in performance is dependent on the successful integration and down-selection of breakthrough technologies at early stage of aircraft development process, supported by advanced multidisciplinary design capabilities. Conceptual design capabilities, integrating more disciplines are routinely used at Future Project Office. The challenge considered here is to transition smoothly from conceptual to preliminary design whilst maintaining a true multidisciplinary approach. The design space must be progressively constrained, whilst at the same time increasing the level of modelling fidelity and keeping as many design options open for as long as possible. Failing to account for all relevant design constraints may result in wasteful investigations into infeasible parts of the design space or design modifications which do not improve the overall aircraft performance.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Oscar Gonzalez, Jérôme Bazile
During the conceptual design phase, the aircraft stability and control derivatives (aerodynamic coefficients) can be estimated by using fast computational means. Aerodynamic potential codes like the Vortex Lattice Method (VLM) or the Doublet Lattice Method (DLM) are very easy to use and are capable of estimating these coefficients accurately as well as providing remarkable insight into wing aerodynamics and components interaction. Compared to the VLM, the DLM (originally used for aeroelastic computations) allows prediction of the steady as well as unsteady stability and control derivatives. The relationships involving these coefficients and the airplane's dynamic behaviour are well known, like for example the one relating the pitch damping derivative and the damping ratio of the Short Period mode. Previous research work (see references 1 and 3 for further details) based on panel methods, has modelled analytically the rigid aircraft aerodynamic coefficients, leading to an interesting result: “A singular combination of longitudinal stability derivatives, independent of the centre of gravity location, could describe, to a great extent, the longitudinal behaviour of a rigid aircraft in flight.”
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Björn Knickrehm
Within this paper, the AIRBUS approach on the development of rivetless nutplates as an alternative to riveted anchor nuts is described. Within the frame of a wider analysis, it was identified that currently used riveted anchor nut elements does have disadvantages with negative impact on an optimized cost-efficient and lead-time driven design and manufacturing environment. Rivetless nutplate systems provide some features that are potentially capable to mitigate some of the identified disadvantages of riveted elements. The paper covers the key requirements and objectives that were put in place in order to identify the most beneficial solution(s). It furthermore contains detailed information on the rivetless nutplate systems selected by AIRBUS and the justification for the selection that was made. Following this, the major challenges of the development of rivetless nutplates are described together with an insight of how these challenges have been approached and what the outcome of the investigations was.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Hans-Gerd Giesseler
The Loads discipline contributes to the aircraft structural design by delivering shear, moment and torque (SMT, loads) all across the airframe resulting from application of aircraft airworthiness requirements as laid down in the CS 25/FAR 25 regulations and in some domestic ones. Loads computation considers the maneuver and gust conditions prescribed therein as well as other special design conditions. It is based on very detailed modeling, accounting for aerodynamics in all configurations, mass properties, flexibility of the airframe, flight control laws and retarded laws, hydraulic actuation, and specification of flight control system failure conditions. The resulting shear loads are processed and refined (e.g. nodal loads) and taken into account by the stress department for structural design. Furthermore, the regulations require the validation of the (aerodynamic and structural) model assumptions used in calculating the design loads levels, which makes the Flight Test Identification (FT-ID) part of the Loads certification process.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Christian Hein, Henning Schneider
Pulsed assembly lines are providing an enormous potential to the aviation industry, especially in terms of reduced lead times, optimized asset utilization and an increased ratio of value adding processes. As it comes near to flow manufacturing the realization of a pulsed assembly line leads to special requirements to the use of NC programs for automated drilling and fastening processes, especially as a result of the unique part positions upon each pulse and concerning the balancing of the work onto several serialized fastening machines. The key to those challenges are versatile NC part programs that eliminate the need for any additionally written NC programs by self-adapting onto the concrete situation within the working areas of the production line.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Georges Hardier, Cédric seren, Pierre Ezerzere
The introduction of Fly-By-Wire (FBW) and the increasing level of automation contribute to improve the safety of civil aircraft significantly. These technological steps permit the development of advanced capabilities for detecting, protecting and optimizing A/C guidance and control. Accordingly, this higher complexity requires extending the availability of aircraft states, some flight parameters becoming key parameters to ensure a good behaviour of the flight control systems. Consequently, the monitoring and consolidation of these signals appear as major issues to achieve the expected autonomy. Two different alternatives occur to get this result. The usual solution consists in introducing many functionally redundant elements (sensors) to enlarge the way the key parameters are measured. This solution corresponds to the classical hardware redundancy, but penalizes the overall system performance in terms of weight, power consumption, space requirements, and extra maintenance needs. The second alternative consists in estimating the parameters thanks to signal processing or model-based techniques.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Moriz Scharpenberg, Thiemo Kier, Laila Taules
Increasing technical dependencies between the engineering disciplines driving the overall design of an aircraft and improving optimization techniques that make use of these interactions blur the lines between distinct disciplines and create demand for a harmonized flight physics model. In this paper we present considerations on a general framework that allows the representation of the equations and data from various domains in an object-oriented and scalable structure. Emphasis is put on the loads aspect with the distinct fields of gust loads, maneuver loads and ground loads analysis, which are essential for structural design. A fully generic, grid based data structure is presented, which is suitable for models of different granularity and applicability. All data is represented in this general form independent of its origin and may be transformed in between the different representations using splines. Coordinate transformations are handled automatically. It accepts local sub-models that are combined to form a complete aircraft representation.
Technical Paper
2011-10-18
Alexander Smirnov, Sergey Lupuleac, Olga Rodionova, Vladislav Shubnikov, Bertrand Bretagnol
The presented paper describes the software complex developed in St. Petersburg Polytechnical University for AIRBUS aimed at simulation of aircraft assembly process. Previous version of this complex was described in [1].
Viewing 1 to 30 of 134

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