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Viewing 1 to 30 of 135
2014-10-02
Article
With its European base and global presence, it would only make sense that Airbus would take a leading role in the EU’s CleanSky 2, a joint technology initiative that is the follow-up to the CleanSky aerospace research program.
2014-08-05
Article
Airbus, British Airways (BA), Heathrow Airport (LHR), and NATS (the main air navigation service provider in the U.K.) have established a partnership to study and develop operational procedures to reduce the number of people affected by noise around London’s Heathrow.
2014-06-19
Article
Airbus Group and Safran are further strengthening their relationship to propose a new family of competitive, versatile, and efficient space launchers, to serve both commercial and institutional needs.
2014-05-08
Article
The first ever Airbus A350 XWB to visit the U.S., MSN2, arrived the second week in May at McKinley Climatic Lab at Eglin Air Force base in Florida. Over several weeks the aircraft and its various systems and cabin installations will be subjected to the extreme hot and cold temperatures that the facility can sustain in a testing environment.
2014-03-10
Article
Greater fuel efficiency and low emission requirements have grown into such an urgent imperative in aircraft design that it often overshadows an equally significant factor in air travel—noise. Airbus shows that it’s possible to infuse acoustic simulation into design processes from beginning to end, giving engineers the acoustic simulation intelligence they need to create quieter aircraft, according to Free Field Technologies.
2014-02-24
Article
Airbus and Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC) signed a memorandum of understanding to develop a mutual understanding on new air traffic management concepts and operations as defined in the ICAO Global Air Navigation Plan.
2014-01-02
Article
Airbus signed a memorandum of understanding with EGTS International, a joint-venture company between Safran and Honeywell Aerospace, to further develop and evaluate an autonomous electric pushback and taxiing solution for the A320 Family.
2013-10-04
Article
Assembly of large and complex carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) components requires the use of liquid resin-based materials for applications such as shimming and aerodynamic sealing. These materials generally require curing times up to 12 h; heated air technology can reduce that time to 2 h.
2013-09-18
Article
Rising system complexity and shortened development cycles have led to the need for an extension of the existing, classical test methods. The Airbus High Lift Test Department is pursuing virtual testing as an additional, equivalent test means besides existing, established physical means of compliance.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2124
Valérie Berger
Airbus business and Extended Enterprise require more and more involvement of design and built suppliers, tier 1 but also across the complete supply chain i.e. tier 2-n. These suppliers are not working only for Aerospace industry and may have different cultures. The pressure on cost and overall efficiency is high and everybody has to cope with obsolescence and new regulation (e.g. REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals)). So it became very important for Airbus to clarify the criteria under which a change can be done without Airbus review, and criteria under which a change can be done without Airworthiness authority review.
2013-04-19
Article
Airbus has begun construction of the company’s A320 Family Assembly Line in Mobile, AL. The new assembly line, which is the company’s first U.S.-based production facility, will be located at the Mobile Brookley Aeroplex and will facilitate assembly of A319, A320, and A321 aircraft.
2012-07-06
Article
Airbus has announced plans to establish a manufacturing facility in the United States to assemble and deliver the family of A319, A320, and A321 aircraft. Located at the Brookley Aeroplex in Mobile, AL, it will be the company's first U.S.
2012-05-31
Article
Researchers from Brötje-Automation and Airbus come up with a “versatile” solution.
2012-03-23
Video
In Aeronautic industry, when we launch a new industrialization for an aircraft sub assembly we always have the same questions in mind for drilling operations, especially when focusing on lean manufacturing. How can we avoid dismantling and deburring parts after drilling operation? Can a drilling centre perform all the tasks needed to deliver a hole ready to install final fastener? How can we decrease down-time of the drilling centre? Can a drilling centre be integrated in a pulse assembly line? How can we improve environmental efficiency of a drilling centre? It is based on these main drivers that AIRBUS has developed, with SPIE and SOS, a new generation of drilling centre dedicated for hard materials such as titanium, and high thicknesses. The first application was for the assembly of the primary structure of A350 engine pylons. The main solution that was implemented meeting several objectives was the development of orbital drilling technology in hard metal stacks.
2011-11-03
Article
In the automotive industry, the industrial robot is a common solution to achieve high-speed, repeatable processes. But due to its lack of accuracy and its compliant nature, use of robots has not been as successful in aircraft manufacturing. The use of force control with robots could change that.
2011-10-20
Article
Due to the conflicting trends of increasing complexity of systems and drastically reduced development times, virtual testing has become one of the solutions to achieve aircraft system certification.
2011-10-18
Journal Article
2011-01-2803
Ali Zolghadri, Anca Gheorghe, Jérôme Cieslak, David Henry, Philippe Goupil, Rémy Dayre, Hervé Le Berre
This paper discusses the design of a model-based fault detection scheme for robust and early detection of runaways in aircraft control surfaces servo-loop. The proposed scheme can be embedded within the structure of in-service monitoring systems as a part of the Flight Control Computer (FCC) software. The final goal is to contribute to improve the performance detection of unanticipated runaway faulty profiles having very different dynamic behaviors, while retaining a perfect robustness. The paper discusses also the tradeoffs between adequacy of the technique and its implementation level, industrial validation process with Engineering support tools, as well as the tuning aspects. The proposed methodology is based on a combined data-driven and system-based approach using a dedicated Kalman filtering. The technique provides an effective method ensuring robustness and good performance (well-defined real-time characteristics and well-defined error rates).
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2804
Philippe Goupil, Andres Marcos
The state-of-practice for aircraft manufacturers to diagnose guidance & control faults and obtain full flight envelope protection at all times is to provide high levels of dissimilar hardware redundancy. This ensures sufficient available control action and allows performing coherency tests, cross and consistency checks, voting mechanisms and built-in test techniques of varying sophistication. This hardware-redundancy based fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) approach is nowadays the standard industrial practice and fits also into current aircraft certification processes while ensuring the highest level of safety standards. In the context of future “sustainable” aircraft (More Affordable, Smarter, Cleaner and Quieter), the Electrical Flight Control System (EFCS) design objectives, originating from structural loads design constraints, are becoming more and more stringent.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2805
Maxime Lastera, Eric Alata, Jean Arlat, Yves Deswarte, David Powell, Bertrand Leconte, Cristina Simache
Traditionally, software in avionics has been totally separated from open-world software, in order to avoid any interaction that could corrupt critical on-board systems. However, new aircraft generations need more interaction with off-board systems to offer extended services, which makes these information flows potentially dangerous. In a previous work, we have proposed the use of virtualization to ensure dependability of critical applications despite bidirectional communication between critical on-board systems and untrusted off-board systems. We have developed a test bed to assess the performance impact induced by the use of virtualization. In this work, various configurations have been experimented that range from a basic machine without an OS up to the complete architecture featuring a hypervisor and an OS running in a virtual machine. Several tests (computation, memory, network) are carried out, and timing measures are collected on different hypervisors.
2011-10-18
Journal Article
2011-01-2793
Oleg Merkulov, Vladimir Zherebtsov, Marina Peganova, Eduard Kitanin, Joseph Kah-Wah Lam, Andrey Sartori
Fuel on-board dehydration during flight technologies has been modeled and experimentally studied on a laboratory testing setup in normal specific gas flow rates range of 0.0002-0.0010 sec-₁. Natural air evolution, ullage blowing and fuel sparging with dry inert gas have been studied. It has been shown that natural air evolution during aircraft climb provides a significant, substantial, but insufficient dehydration of fuel up to 20% relative. Ullage blowing during cruise leads to a constant, but a slow dehydration of fuel with sufficient column height concentration gradient. Dry inert gas sparging held after the end of the natural air evolution or simultaneously with natural air evolution provides rapid fuel dehydration to the maximum possible values. It potentially may eliminate water release and deposition in fuel to -50°C. It has been found that for proper dehydration, necessary and sufficient volume of dry inert gas to volume of fuel ratio is about 1.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2795
Solange Baena, Craig Lawson, Joseph Kah-Wah Lam
Water is always present in jet fuel, usually in a mixture of forms. At very low temperatures this phenomenon can lead to the formation of ice crystals within the aircraft fuel system, which can then stay in suspension within the entire volume of fuel. Pumps within the fuel system transfer fuel around the system. Pumps such as boost pumps that are typically used in fuel systems are protected by a weave type filter mesh at the inlet. Ice accretion on the surface of this mesh has operational implications as it can cause non optimal fuel flow. In this investigation, two fundamental tools are being used: 1) a high fidelity MATLAB model of a mesh strainer, pick-up line and pump, and 2) a test rig of the modelled system. The model is being used to investigate fuel system performance when exposed to fuel containing water/ice contaminants at cold temperatures.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2794
Liyun Lao, Colin Ramshaw, Hoi Yeung, Mark Carpenter, Janice Hetherington, Joseph Kah-Wah Lam, Sarah Barley
Experimental studies were performed to gain a better understanding of the behaviour of water in jet fuel at low temperatures. The transition of water in fuel from dissolved water to free water, and its subsequent precipitation behaviour when the fuel was cooled down, were investigated using a 20 litre glass-windowed aluminium tank. The effects of cooled internal surfaces were explored with chilled plates at the top and bottom of the aluminium tank. The tank was fitted with an array of thermocouples, which allowed horizontal and vertical temperature profiles to be measured. A laser visualisation system incorporating image processing software was used to capture images inside the simulated tank without interfering with the convective flow of the fuel. Fuel will precipitate any excess dissolved water when cooled below the saturation temperature. The excess water may then appear in the form of fine water droplets or ice particles as a fine cloud (fog).
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2796
Volker Baumbach, Robert Behr, Gerhard Hummel
In the past decades hydraulic systems have dominated actuation tasks in aerospace applications. Even today hydraulic actuation remains in first line for primary flight controls as well as for heavy consumers such as landing gear or auxiliary applications in the perimeter of military functions. Also in future, hydraulic systems and its consumers are candidates to fulfil operational and functional requirements and provide respective improvements to ensure product competitiveness. Thus, this paper deals with potential improvements on hydraulic system level such as, fluid monitoring and light weight applications linked to impacts on aircraft level or interfacing systems.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2717
Gernot Ladstaetter, Nicolas Reichert, Thomas Obert
Over the last few years, IT systems have quickly found their way onboard aircrafts, driven by the continuous pursuit of improved safety and efficiency in aircraft operation, but also in an attempt to provide the ultimate in-flight experience for passengers. Along with IT systems and communication links came IT security as a new factor in the equation when evaluating and monitoring the operational risk that needs to be managed during the operation of the aircraft. This is mainly due to the fact that security deficiencies can cause services to be unavailable, or even worse, to be exploited by intentional attacks or inadvertent actions. Aircraft manufacturers needed to develop new processes and had to get organized accordingly in order to efficiently and effectively address these new risks.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2769
Georges Hardier, Cédric seren, Pierre Ezerzere
The introduction of Fly-By-Wire (FBW) and the increasing level of automation contribute to improve the safety of civil aircraft significantly. These technological steps permit the development of advanced capabilities for detecting, protecting and optimizing A/C guidance and control. Accordingly, this higher complexity requires extending the availability of aircraft states, some flight parameters becoming key parameters to ensure a good behaviour of the flight control systems. Consequently, the monitoring and consolidation of these signals appear as major issues to achieve the expected autonomy. Two different alternatives occur to get this result. The usual solution consists in introducing many functionally redundant elements (sensors) to enlarge the way the key parameters are measured. This solution corresponds to the classical hardware redundancy, but penalizes the overall system performance in terms of weight, power consumption, space requirements, and extra maintenance needs.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2801
Florian Cazes, Corinne Mailhes, Marie Chabert, Philippe Goupil, Rémy Dayre, Hervé Le Berre
In the framework of the aircraft global optimization, for future and upcoming programs, current research interests include more Electrical Flight Control System (EFCS) autonomy for a more easy-to-handle aircraft. A possible solution is to increase the number of redundant flight parameter sensors but to the detriment of the aircraft weight and so to the cost and performances. This paper proposes an algorithm using PLS (Partial Least Squares) to estimate a flight parameter from independent sensor measurements. The estimates are then used as so-called “software” or “virtual” sensors, allowing aircraft weight saving. This algorithm is based on an iterative processing and thus can be used in real time in the embedded flight control computer. Furthermore, the resulting flight parameter estimates can be used to detect failures. Different detection strategies are proposed and results show that this method can lead to robust detections.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2501
Jean-Pierre Cachelet
This paper proposes a rearview on aeronautical innovation, addresses some 2000-2010 new products, and suggests elements of future vision, serving passengers aspirations. Over 100 years, aeronautics brilliantly domesticated flight: feasibility, safety, efficiency, international travel, traffic volume and noise, allowing airlines to run a business, really connecting real people. Despite some maturations, new developments should extend the notion of passenger service. So far, turbofans became silent and widebodies opened ‘air-bus’ travel for widespread business, tourism or education. Today airports symbolize cities and vitalize regional economies. 2000-2010 saw the full double-decker, the new eco-friendly freighter and electronic ticketing. In technology, new winglets and neo classical engines soon will save short-range blockfuel. In systems and maintenance, integrated modular avionics and onboard data systems give new flexibility, incl by data links to ground.
2011-10-18
Journal Article
2011-01-2519
Mark Trafford, Sebastian Klein, Dirk Meiranke
AmSafe®, Airbus and IABG were the first in decades to undertake an ultimate forward load Full-Scale Test (FST) of a 9 g₁ Barrier Net. Barrier Nets are safety-critical products used during an emergency landing (FAR25.561/CS25.561) to protect passengers and crew. When Airbus Military required an A400M Barrier Net they identified requirements well beyond the "normal" and demanded that payloads from a rigid structure to a frangible be restrained. AmSafe uses non-liner Finite Element Analysis (FEA) technology to analyze their nets and proposed an innovative solution for a new Barrier Net to satisfy these very demanding requirements. Given these new requirements, it was decided to also carry out a Full-Scale Test (FST). This test required the expertise of IABG, a testing facility based in Germany.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2548
Christel Seguin, Pierre Bieber, Eckard Boede, Marco Bozzano, Matthias Bretschneider, Antonella Cavallo, Johann Deneux, Jean-Pierre Heckmann, Oleg Lisagor, Marion Morel, Chris Papadopoulos, Laurent Sagaspe, Valerie Sartor, Rémi Delmas
Model Based Safety techniques have been developed for a number of years, though the models have not been customised to help address the safety considerations/ actions at each refinement level. The work performed in the MISSA Project looked at defining the content of “safety models” for each of the refinement levels. A modelling approach has been defined that provides support for the initial functional hazard analysis, then for the systems architectural definition level and finally for the systems implementation level. The Aircraft functional model is used to apportion qualitative and quantitative requirements, the systems architectural level is used to perform a preliminary systems safety analysis to demonstrate that a system architecture can satisfy qualitative and quantitative requirements.
2011-10-18
Journal Article
2011-01-2566
Qianni Zhang, Xinyu Lin, Chris Papadopoulos, Jean-Pierre Heckmann, Oleg Lisagor, Valerie Sartor, Ebroul Izquierdo
The work describes a concept application that aids a safety engineer to create a layup of equipment models by using an image scan of a schematic and a library of predefined standard component and their symbols. The approach uses image recognition techniques to identify the symbols within the scanned image of the schematic from a given library of symbols. Two recognition approaches are studied, one uses General Hough Transform; the other is based on pixel-level feature computation combining both structure and statistical features. The application allows the user to accept or edit the results of the recognition step and allows the user to define new components during the layup step. The tool then generates an output file that is compatible with a formal safety modeling tool. The identified symbols are associated to behavioral nodes from a model based safety tool.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 135

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