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Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Albert Albers, Kevin Matros, Matthias Behrendt, Johannes Henschel, Heidelinde Holzer, Wolfram Bohne
A Full-Hybrid-Electric-Vehicle provides the option of operating purely on an electric basis. However, under certain conditions an additional start of the combustion engine is required. The engine mainly needs to be started in case the electric power of the hybrid system is exceeded, the state of charge of the battery is low, or further systemic reasons (e.g. a high heating request, a cold high-voltage battery). The engine-start influences the dynamics, the comfort as well as the efficiency of the vehicle and is therefore highly relevant for the customer satisfaction. For an ideal engine-start from a customer’s point of view it is essential to choose an appropriate starting-system (e.g. starter motor with pinion, starter motor with belt, starting clutch) in combination with an appropriate starting-strategy (e.g. restrain of power, gear shift). This article is a result of a research cooperation between IPEK - Institute of Product Engineering at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and BMW AG.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Giorgio Veronesi, Christopher Albert, Eugène Nijman, Jan Rejlek, Arnaud Bocquillet
Abstract In many application fields, such as automotive and aerospace, the full FE Biot model has been widely applied to vibro-acoustics problems involving poro-elastic materials in order to predict their structural and acoustic performance. The main drawback of this approach is however the large computational burden and the uncertainty of the input data (Biot parameters) that may lead to less accurate prediction. In order to overcome these disadvantages industry is asking for more efficient techniques. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of structures coupled with poroelastic trims and fluid cavities can be predicted by means of the Patch Transfer Function (PTF) approach. The PTF is a sub-structuring procedure that allows for coupling different sub-systems via impedance relations determined at their common interfaces. The coupling surfaces are discretised into elementary areas called patches. Since the patch impedances can be determined in either computational or experimental manner, the PTF approach offers full modularity.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kristian Haehndel, Angus Pere, Torsten Frank, Frieder Christel, Sylvester Abanteriba
Abstract As computational methodologies become more integrated into industrial vehicle pre-development processes the potential for high transient vehicle thermal simulations is evident. This can also been seen in conjunction with the strong rise in computing power, which ultimately has supported many automotive manufactures in attempting non-steady simulation conditions. The following investigation aims at exploring an efficient means of utilizing the new rise in computing resources by resolving high time-dependent boundary conditions through a series of averaging methodologies. Through understanding the sensitivities associated with dynamic component temperature changes, optimised boundary conditions can be implemented to dampen irrelevant input frequencies whilst maintaining thermally critical velocity gradients. A sub-module derived from real vehicle geometry was utilised to evaluate a series of alternative averaging schemes (consisting of steady-state CFD points) in comparison to full CFD transient conditions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kristian Haehndel, Anthony Jefferies, Markus Schlipf, Torsten Frank, Frieder Christel, Sylvester Abanteriba
Abstract At the rear of the vehicle an end acoustic silencer is attached to the exhaust system. This is primarily to reduce noise emissions for the benefit of passengers and bystanders. Due to the location of the end acoustic silencer conventional thermal protection methods (heat shields) through experimental means can not only be difficult to incorporate but also can be an inefficient and costly experience. Hence simulation methods may improve the development process by introducing methods of optimization in early phase vehicle design. A previous publication (Part 1) described a methodology of improving the surface temperatures prediction of general exhaust configurations. It was found in this initial study that simulation results for silencer configurations exhibited significant discrepancies in comparison to experimental data. This was mainly due to the inability to represent complex fluid flows through the components of the silencer, which was greatly simplified in the simulation models and software utilised.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Steve De Vos, Kristian Haehndel, Torsten Frank, Frieder Christel, Sylvester Abanteriba
Modern exhaust systems contain not only a piping network to transport hot gas from the engine to the atmosphere, but also functional components such as the catalytic converter and turbocharger. The turbocharger is common place in the automotive industry due to their capability to increase the specific power output of reciprocating engines. As the exhaust system is a main heat source for the under body of the vehicle and the turbocharger is located within the engine bay, it is imperative that accurate surface temperatures are achieved. A study by K. Haehndel [1] implemented a 1D fluid stream as a replacement to solving 3D fluid dynamics of the internal exhaust flow. To incorporate the 3D effects of internal fluid flow, augmented Nusselt correlations were used to produce heat transfer coefficients. It was found that the developed correlations for the exhaust system did not adequately represent the heat transfer of the turbocharger. This paper addresses the fluid flow phenomena present in the turbine volute and applies augmented Nusselt correlations to accurately represent the heat transfer coefficients of the internal volute surface.
Technical Paper
2013-11-20
Kristian Haehndel, Torsten Frank, Frieder Christel, Sylvester Abanteriba
Within the pre-development phase of a vehicle validation process, the role of computational simulation is becoming increasingly prominent in efforts to ensure thermal safety. This gain in popularity has resulted from the cost and time advantages that simulation has compared to experimental testing. Additionally many of these early concepts cannot be validated through experimental means due to the lack of hardware, and must be evaluated via numerical methods. The Race Track Simulation (RTS) can be considered as the final frontier for vehicle thermal management techniques, and to date no coherent method has been published which provides an efficient means of numerically modeling the temperature behavior of components without the dependency on statistical experimental data. The following investigation will explore an innovative methodology which utilizes a conventional method of simulation whilst integrating multiple 3-Dimensional CFD solutions which are interpolated to match a derived moving average profile.
Technical Paper
2013-05-13
Robert Powell, Philippe Moron, Ganapathy Balasubramanian, Barbara Neuhierl, Sivapalan Senthooran, Bernd Crouse, David Freed, Cornelia Kain, Frank Ullrich
Wind noise is a significant source of interior noise in automobiles at cruising conditions, potentially creating dissatisfaction with vehicle quality. While wind noise contributions at higher frequencies usually originate with transmission through greenhouse panels and sealing, the contribution coming from the underbody area often dominates the interior noise spectrum at lower frequencies. Continued pressure to reduce fuel consumption in new designs is causing more emphasis on aerodynamic performance, to reduce drag by careful management of underbody airflow at cruise. Simulation of this airflow by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools allows early optimization of underbody shapes before expensive hardware prototypes are feasible. By combining unsteady CFD-predicted loads on the underbody panels with a structural acoustic model of the vehicle, underbody wind noise transmission could be considered in the early design phases. This paper describes a numerical process capable of simulating underbody contributions to interior wind noise.
Technical Paper
2013-05-13
Jan Rejlek, Giorgio Veronesi, Christopher Albert, Eugene Nijman, Arnaud Bocquillet
Over the past 30 years, the computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools have been applied extensively in the automotive industry. In order to accelerate time-to-market while coping with legal limits that have become increasingly restrictive over the last decades, CAE has become an indispensable tool covering all major fields in a modern automotive product design process. However, when tackling complex real-life engineering problems, the computational models might become rather involved and thus less efficient. Therefore, the overall trend in the automotive industry is currently heading towards combined approaches, which allow the best of the both worlds, namely the experimental measurement and numerical simulation, to be merged into one integrated scheme. In this paper, the so-called patch transfer function (PTF) approach is adopted to solve coupled vibro-acoustic problems. In the PTF scheme, the interfaces between fluid and structure are discretised in terms of patches. This allows the different sub-systems to be characterised in a separate way by their respective surface impedance matrix.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Markus Schratter, Michael Karner, Peter Wimmer, Daniel Watzenig, Christian Gruber
With the huge improvements made during the last years in the area of integrated safety systems, they are one of the main contributors to the massively rising complexity within automotive systems. However, this enormous complexity stimulates the demand for methodologies supporting the efficient development of such systems, both in terms of cost and development time. Within this work, we propose a co-simulation-based approach for the validation of integrated safety systems. Based on data measurements gained from a test bed, models for the sensors and the distributed safety system are established. They are integrated into a co-simulation environment containing models of the ambience, driving dynamics, and the crash-behavior of the vehicle. Hence, the complete heterogeneous system including all relevant effects and dependencies is modeled within the co-simulation. This allows validating the distributed integrated safety system by performing a number of fast and efficient co-simulation-based dynamic test runs with different external (e.g. environment) and internal parameters (e.g. configuration of the integrated safety system, different algorithms, and strategies).
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Juergen Lescheticky, Graham Barnes, Marc Schrank
Despite increasingly stringent crash requirements, the body structures of future mainstream production cars need to get lighter. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites with a density 1/5th of steel and very high specific energy absorption represent a material technology where substantial mass can be saved when compared to traditional steel applications. BMW have addressed the demanding challenges of producing several hundred composite Body-in-White (BIW) assemblies a day and are committed to significant adoption of composites in future vehicle platforms, as demonstrated in the upcoming i3 and i8 models. A next step to further integrate composites into passenger cars is for primary structural members, which also perform critical roles in passive safety by absorbing large amounts of energy during a crash event. In order to move forward the integration of CFRP materials in primary structures, the same high level of confidence in passive safety design simulations achieved by BMW for metallic structures needs to be achieved with composites designs.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Kristian Haehndel, Torsten Frank, Frieder Martin Christel, Carsten Spengler, Gerrit Suck, Sylvester Abanteriba
The thermal prediction of a vehicle under-body environment is of high importance in the design, optimization and management of vehicle power systems. Within the pre-development phase of a vehicle's production process, it is important to understand and determine regions of high thermally induced stress within critical under-body components. Therefore allowing engineers to modify the design or alter component material characteristics before the manufacture of hardware. As the exhaust system is one of the primary heat sources in a vehicle's under-body environment, it is vital to predict the thermal fluctuation of surface temperatures along corresponding exhaust components in order to achieve the correct thermal representation of the overall under-body heat transfer. This paper explores a new method for achieving higher accuracy exhaust surface temperature predictions. To avoid the experimental dependency of fixed exhaust temperature surfaces, a 1-Dimensional fluid stream was integrated within a 3-Dimensional exhaust surface piping network.
Technical Paper
2012-06-13
Alfred Zeitler
According to upcoming legislative regulations in certain countries, electric and hybrid-electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs) will have to be equipped with devices to compensate for the lack of engine noise needed to warn pedestrians against the vehicles. This leads to the question of appropriate sound design which has to meet specific psychoacoustic requirements. The present paper focuses on auditory features of warning sounds to enhance pedestrians' safety with a major focus on the detectability of the exterior noise of the vehicle in an ambient noise. For the evaluation of detectability, the psychoacoustic model developed by Kerber and Fastl will be introduced allowing for the prediction of masked thresholds of the approaching vehicle. The instrumental assessment yields estimates of the distance of an approaching vehicle at the point it becomes audible to the pedestrians. This way the risk of collision can be assessed assuming that only auditory cues are used by pedestrians to identify vehicles before crossing a street.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Satheesh Kandasamy, Bradley Duncan, Holger Gau, Fabien Maroy, Alain Belanger, Norbert Gruen, Sebastian Schäufele
Aerodynamic performance assessment of automotive shapes is typically performed in wind tunnels. However, with the rapid progress in computer hardware technology and the maturity and accuracy of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software packages, evaluation of the production-level automotive shapes using a digital process has become a reality. As the time to market shrinks, automakers are adopting a digital design process for vehicle development. This has elevated the accuracy requirements on the flow simulation software, so that it can be used effectively in the production environment. Evaluation of aerodynamic performance covers prediction of the aerodynamic coefficients such as drag, lift, side force and also lift balance between the front and rear axle. Drag prediction accuracy is important for meeting fuel efficiency targets, prediction of front and rear lifts as well as side force and yawing moment are crucial for high speed handling. In this paper, we have focused on the evaluation of aerodynamic coefficients on a wide range of BMW validation shapes.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Nils Lohmann, Manuel Fischnaller, Joachim Melbert, Thomas Musch, Peter Lamp, Sebastian Scharner, Verena Liebau
Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) are becoming increasingly important as an intermediate step on the roadmap to Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV). Li-Ion is the most important battery technology for future hybrid and electrical vehicles. Cycle life of batteries for automotive applications is a major concern of design and development on vehicles with electrified powertrain. Cell manufacturers present various cell chemistries based on Li-Ion technology. For choosing cells with the best cycle life performance appropriate test methods and criteria must be obtained. Cells must be stressed with accelerated aging methods, which correlate with real life conditions. There is always a conflict between high accelerating factors for fast results on the one hand and best accordance with reality on the other hand. Investigations are done on three different Li-Ion cell types which are applicable in the use of PHEVs. In order to obtain results independent of manufacturing tolerance, several cells of each type are used.
Video
2012-03-29
What are the requirements of customers in an urban environment? What will sustainable mobility look like in the future? This presentation gives an overview of the integrated approach used by BMW to develop the BMW i3 - a purpose-built battery electric vehicle. Very low driving resistances for such a vehicle concept enable the delivery of both impressive range and driving excitement. A small optional auxiliary power unit offers range security for unexpected situations and opens up BEVs to customers who are willing to buy a BEV but are still hesitant due to range anxiety. Additional electric vehicles sold to the formerly range anxious will create additional electric miles. Presenter Franz Storkenmaier, BMW Group
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Pascal Theissen, Johannes Wojciak, Kirstin Heuler, Rainer Demuth, Thomas Indinger, Nikolaus Adams
Unsteady aerodynamic flow phenomena are investigated in the wind tunnel by oscillating a realistic 50% scale model around its vertical axis. Thus the model is exposed to time-dependent flow conditions at realistic Reynolds and Strouhal numbers. Using this setup unsteady aerodynamic loads are observed to differ significantly from quasi-steady loads. In particular, the unsteady yaw moment exceeds the quasi-steady approximation by 80%. On the other hand, side force and roll moment are over predicted by quasi-steady approximation but exhibit a significant time delay. Using hotwire anemometry, a delayed reaction of the wake flow of Δt/T = 0.15 is observed, which is thought to be the principal cause for the differences between unsteady and quasi-steady aerodynamic loads. A schematic mechanism explaining these differences due to the delayed reaction of the wake flow is proposed. Additionally, the wake topology observed in previous studies for constant yaw featuring fluid entering into the wake region from the leeward side accompanied by two counter-rotating vortices is confirmed.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Johannes Wojciak, Pascal Theissen, Kirstin Heuler, Thomas Indinger, Nikolaus Adams, Rainer Demuth
Unsteady aerodynamic flow phenomena are investigated in a wind tunnel by oscillating a realistic 50% scale model around the vertical axis. Thus the model is exposed to time-dependent flow conditions at realistic Reynolds and Strouhal numbers. Using this setup unsteady aerodynamic loads are observed to differ significantly from quasi steady loads. In particular, the unsteady yaw moment exceeds the quasi steady approximation significantly. On the other hand, side force and roll moment are over predicted by quasi steady approximation but exhibit a significant time delay. Part 2 of this study proves that a delayed and enhanced response of the surface pressures at the rear side of the vehicle is responsible for the differences between unsteady and quasi steady loads. The pressure changes at the vehicle front, however, are shown to have similar amplitudes and almost no phase shift compared to quasi steady flow conditions. The difference between unsteady and quasi steady yaw moment proves to be independent of oscillation amplitudes between 2deg and 4deg.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Manuel Fischnaller, Joachim Melbert, Sebastian Scharner, Tanja Eichner
A test center for aging analysis and characterization of Lithium-Ion batteries for automotive applications is optimized by means of a dedicated cell tester. The new power tester offers high current magnitude with fast rise time in order to generate arbitrary charge and discharge waveforms, which are identical to real power net signals in vehicles. Upcoming hybrid and electrical cars show fast current transients due to the implemented power electronics like inverter or DC/DC converter. The various test procedures consider single and coupled effects from current profile, state of charge and temperature. They are simultaneously applied on several cells in order to derive statistical significance. Comprehensive safely functions on both the hardware and the software level ensure proper operation of the complex system.
Technical Paper
2010-11-03
Thomas Helmer, Adrian Ebner, Randa Radwan Samaha, Paul Scullion, Ronald Kates
Evaluation of safety benefits is an essential task during design and development of pedestrian protection systems. Comparative evaluation of different safety concepts is facilitated by a common metric taking into account the expected human benefits. Translation of physical characteristics of a collision, such as impact speed, into human benefits requires reliable and preferably evidence-based injury models. To this end, the dependence of injury severity of body regions on explanatory factors is quantified here using the US Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS) for pedestrians in frontal vehicle collisions. The explanatory and causal factors include vehicle component characteristics, physiological and biomechanical variables, and crash parameters. Severe to serious injuries most often involve the head, thorax and lower extremities. In terms of causing components; severe head and thorax injuries occur mainly on the windshield and hood region; serious lower extremity injuries usually occur on the front bumper.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Jose L. Ortiz, Daniel Heiserer
Nowadays there is an increasing need to streamline CAE processes. One such process consists of translating a Multibody Dynamics System (MBS) model into an equivalent Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model. Typically, users start with the creation of a MBS model which is set at a desired operating point by means of running simulations in the MBS domain (e.g. dynamics, statics.) The MBS model is then further translated into an equivalent FEA model which is used to perform simulations in the FEA domain (e.g. passive safety/crash, noise vibration harshness/NVH.) Currently, the translation of the MBS model into a FEA model is done either manually or by means of using a user-written script. This paper shows that a user-written script that translates a MBS model into a FEA model can not provide a high fidelity translation. In general, it is found that eigenvalues computed by the FEA code would not match eigenvalues computed by the MBS code. This work presents mathematical details showing that an accurate translation ought to be performed by an export algorithm from within the MBS code.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Gregor Tesch, Rainer Demuth, Nikolaus Adams
This paper presents a new approach to analyzing and developing low-drag cooling systems. A relation is derived which describes cooling drag by a number of contributions. Interference drag clearly can be identified as one of them. Cooling system parameters can be assigned to different terms of the relation, so that differences due to parameter variations of the individual drag contributions can be estimated. In order to predict the interference-drag dependency on the outlet location and the local outlet mass flow, an extensive study on a standard BMW sedan has been carried out, both experimentally and by CFD. The results show the importance of providing consistent outflow conditions which take into account the outlet location and flow direction, in order to minimize cooling drag.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Wolfgang Thiel, Roman Woegerbauer, David Eason
In the environmentally conscious world we live in, auto manufacturers are under extreme pressure to reduce tailpipe emissions from cars and trucks. The manufacturers have responded by creating clean-burning engines and exhaust treatments that mainly produce CO2 and water vapor along with trace emissions of pollutants such as CO, THC, NOx, and CH4. The trace emissions are regulated by law, and testing must be performed to show that they are below a certain level for the vehicle to be classified as road legal. Modern engine and pollution control technology has moved so quickly toward zero pollutant emissions that the testing technology is no longer able to accurately measure the trace levels of pollutants. Negative emission values are often measured for some pollutants, as shown by results from eight laboratories independently testing the same SULEV automobile. The negative emission values are shown to be caused by actual values that are very near zero, physically imperfect testing equipment and practical testing issues.
Article
2009-07-13
Making sure that ECU software is not just implemented but also properly tested and verified requires strict rules of collaboration between OEM and supplier, said BMW during the 2009 Vector Forum at Stuttgart. BMW and ZF were among the companies to report on successful strategies of collaboration in the software field.
Technical Paper
2009-05-19
Philippe Moron, Robert Powell, Dave Freed, Franck Perot, Bernd Crouse, Barbara Neuhierl, Frank Ullrich, Michael Höll, Artur Waibl, Cornelia Fertl
For most car manufacturers, aerodynamic noise is becoming the dominant high frequency noise source (> 500 Hz) at highway speeds. Design optimization and early detection of issues related to aeroacoustics remain mainly an experimental art implying high cost prototypes, expensive wind tunnel sessions, and potentially late design changes. To reduce the associated costs as well as development times, there is strong motivation for the development of a reliable numerical prediction capability. The goal of this paper is to present a computational approach developed to predict the greenhouse windnoise contribution to the interior noise heard by the vehicle passengers. This method is based on coupling an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver for the windnoise excitation to a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) solver for the structural acoustic behavior. The basic strategy is to convert the time-domain pressure signals generated by CFD everywhere on the panels into structural power inputs, which in turn are used as input to an SEA model leading to the noise inside the cabin.
Technical Paper
2009-05-19
Philipp Scheibner, Andreas Wendemuth
A widely common principle of sound quality engineering is the development of objective measures determining human perception. Beside stationary sound parts, auditory events that are based on time-variant attributes have a traceable influence on human perception, particularly in the field of product sound quality. In this paper the significance and identification of the relevant sound quality parameters for power seat adjusters are investigated with a specific design of experiments (DoE). This methodology was used to advance the efficiency of subjective tests. The necessity of an efficient design is given through a relatively high number of variable parameters and, furthermore, through the demands of a qualitative experiment with limited effort for each subject in the listening tests. Instead of investigating randomly picked sounds this approach concentrates on a systematic scanning of the parameter space. With the results, this paper propose both to enhance the capabilities of subjective response tests and to ensure the essential high quality claims to subjective testing.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Stefano Toninel, Hendrik Forkel, Thomas Frank, Bodo Durst, Christian Hasse, Dirk Linse
The G-equation model was implemented in the commercial code ANSYS CFX and validated against experimental data in order to successfully simulate turbulent premixed combustion in internal combustion engines. The model is based on the level-set approach. Two transport equations are solved respectively for the G-scalar mean value, representing the local distance function from the time-averaged mean flame front, and its variance, correlated to the turbulent flame brush thickness. The model closure for tracking the flame front is based on an algebraic expression for the turbulent burning velocity. The composition of the reacted mixture is evaluated by coupling the code with flamelet libraries generated with the ANSYS CFX-RIF package by means of a reaction progress variable computed as a function of the G-related quantities. An innovative technique for periodically re-initializing the G-scalar field, in order to enforce geometrical consistency and avoid numerical instabilities, was developed, consisting of a least-square-based interface reconstruction and a minimization of the distance from the discretized flame front.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Sven A. Beiker, Renate C. Vachenauer
While hybrid-electric powertrain features such as regenerative braking and electric driving can improve the fuel economy of a vehicle significantly, these features may also have a considerable impact on driving dynamics. That is why extra effort is necessary to ensure safety and comfort that customers usually expect from a conventional vehicle. The purpose of this paper is to initiate a discussion regarding different drivetrain concepts, necessary changes in chassis systems, and the impact on vehicle dynamics. To provide input to this essential discussion, braking and steering systems, as well as suspension design, are analyzed regarding their fit with hybrid systems. It is shown how an integration of hybrid technology and chassis systems benefits vehicle dynamics and why “by-wire” technology is a key enabler for safe and comfortable hybrid-electric vehicles.
Technical Paper
2008-10-20
Gerulf Kinkelin, Alain Gilberg, Bertrand Delord, Harald Heinecke, Simon Fürst, Juergen Moessinger, Andreas Lapp, Ulrich Virnich, Stefan Bunzel, Thomas Weber, Noë Spinner, Lennart Lundh, Daniel Svensson, Peter Heitkämper, Fredrik Mattsson, Kenji Nishikawa, Hiroyuki Hirano, Klaus Lange, Bernd Kunkel
The AUTomotive Open System ARchitecture (AUTOSAR) Development Partnership has published early 2008 the specifications Release 3.0 [1], with a prime focus on the overall architecture, basic software, run time environment, communication stacks and methodology. Heavy developments have taken place in the OEM and supplier community to deliver AUTOSAR loaded cars on the streets starting 2008 [2]. The 2008 achievements have been: Improving the specifications in order to secure the exploitation for body, chassis and powertrain applications Adding major features: safety related functionalities, OBD II and Telematics application interfaces.
Technical Paper
2008-06-17
Domingo Rodriguez Flick, Heiner Bubb
Today digital 3D human models are widely used to support the development of future products and in planning and designing production systems. However, these virtual models are generally not sufficiently intuitive and configuring accurate and real body postures is very time consuming. Furthermore, additionally using a human model to virtually examine manual assembly operations of a vehicle is currently synonymous with increased user inputs. In most cases, the user is required to have in-depth expertise in the deployed simulation system. In view of the problems described, in terms of human-computer interaction, it is essential to research and identify the requirements for simulation with digital human models. To this end, experienced staff members gathered the requirements which were then evaluated and weighted by the potential user community. Weaknesses of the simulation software will also be detected, permitting optimisation recommendations to be identified.
Technical Paper
2008-06-17
Christian Amann, André Huschenbeth, Raphael Zenk, Nicole Montmayeur, Christian Marca, Carole Michel
This paper presents an integrated simulation process which has been performed in order to assess the riding comfort performance of a vehicle seat system virtually. Present methods of seat comfort design rely on the extensive testing of numerous hardware prototypes. In order to overcome the limitations of this expensive and time-consuming process, and to fasten innovation, simulation-based design has to be used to predict the seat comfort performance very early in the seat design process, leading to a drastic reduction in the number of physical prototypes. The accurate prediction of the seat transfer function by numerical simulation requires a complete simulation chain, which takes into account the successive stages determining the final seat behaviour when submitted to vibrations. First the manufacturing stresses inside the cushion, resulting from the trimming process, are computed. Due to the highly non-linear behaviour of the foam material, these stresses modify the behaviour of the foam blocks, when further loaded by the occupant weight.
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