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Viewing 1 to 30 of 77
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0202
Yi L. Murphey, Dev Kochhar, Fang Chen, Yinghao Huang, Yong Wang
We present research in progress to develop and implement a transportable instrumentation package (TIP) to collect driver data in a vehicle. The overall objective of the project is to investigate the symbiotic relationship between humans and their vehicles. We first describe the state-of-art technologies to build the components of TIP that meet the criteria of ease of installation, minimal interference with driving, and sufficient signals to monitor driver state and condition. This method is a viable alternative to current practice which is to first develop a fully instrumented test vehicle, often at great expense, and use it to collect data from each participant as he/she drives a prescribed route. Another practice, as for example currently being used in the SHRP-2 naturalistic driving study, is to install the appropriate instrumentation for data collection in each individual's vehicle, often requiring several hours. TIP is designed to take some 30 minutes to install in a vehicle, and is portable from vehicle to vehicle.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0513
Aaron Williams, Jonathan Burton, Robert L. McCormick, Todd Toops, Andrew A. Wereszczak, Ethan E. Fox, Michael J. Lance, Giovanni Cavataio, Douglas Dobson, Jim Warner, Rasto Brezny, K. Nguyen, D. William Brookshear
Alkali and alkaline earth metal impurities found in diesel fuels are potential poisons for diesel exhaust catalysts. Using an accelerated aging procedure, a set of production exhaust systems from a 2011 Ford F250 equipped with a 6.7L diesel engine have been aged to an equivalent of 150,000 miles of thermal aging and metal exposure. These exhaust systems included a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Four separate exhaust systems were aged, each with a different fuel: ULSD containing no measureable metals, B20 containing sodium, B20 containing potassium and B20 containing calcium. Metals levels were selected to simulate the maximum allowable levels in B100 according to the ASTM D6751 standard. Analysis of the aged catalysts included Federal Test Procedure emissions testing with the systems installed on a Ford F250 pickup, bench flow reactor testing of catalyst cores, and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA).
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0495
Benjamin Lee, Daniel Boston, Qinpeng Wang, Godfried Augenbroe, Bert Bras, Tina Guldberg, Christiaan Paredis, Michael Tinskey, Donna Bell
In recent years, the residential and transportation sectors have made significant strides in reducing energy consumption, mainly by focusing efforts on low-hanging fruit in each sector independently. This independent viewpoint has been successful in the past because the user needs met and resources consumed in each sector have been clearly distinct. However, the trend towards vehicle electrification has blurred the boundary between the sectors. With both the home and vehicle now relying upon the same energy source, interactions between the systems can no longer be neglected. For example, when tiered utility pricing schemes are considered, the energy consumption of each system affects the cost of the other. In this paper, the authors present an integrated Home-Vehicle Simulation Model (HVSM), allowing the designer to take a holistic view. Amongst other possibilities, this model allows a designer to evaluate the economic and environmental impacts of multiple retrofit alternatives, whether they concern modifications to the home and its appliances, the vehicle, or any combination.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0904
Xiaoye Han, Jimi Tjong, Meiping Wang, Graham Reader, Ming Zheng
As a renewable energy source, the ethanol fuel was employed with a diesel fuel in this study to improve the cylinder charge homogeneity for high load operations, targeting on ultra-low nitrogen oxides (NOx) and smoke emissions. A light-duty diesel engine is configured to adapt intake port fuelling of the ethanol fuel while keeping all other original engine components intact. High load experiments are performed to investigate the combustion control and low emission enabling without sacrificing the high compression ratio (18.2:1). The intake boost, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and injection pressure are independently controlled, and thus their effects on combustion and emission characteristics of the high load operation are investigated individually. The low temperature combustion is accomplished at high engine load (16~17 bar IMEP) with regulation compatible NOx and soot emissions. The test results also indicate that use of renewable ethanol alleviates the dependence on intake boost, EGR and injection pressure for low temperature combustion.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1530
Ienkaran Arasaratnam, Ryan Ahmed, Mohammed El-Sayed, Jimi Tjong, Saeid Habibi
Hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and electric vehicles have enthusiastically embraced rechargeable Li-ion batteries as their primary/supplemental power source of choice. Because the state of charge (SoC) of a battery indicates available remaining energy, the battery management system of these vehicles must estimate the SoC accurately. To estimate the SoC of Li-ion batteries, we derive a normalized state-space model based on Li-ion electrochemistry and apply a Bayesian algorithm. The Bayesian algorithm is obtained by modifying Potter's squareroot filter and named the Potter SoC tracker (PST) in this paper. We test the PST in challenging test cases including high-rate charge/discharge cycles with outlier cell voltage measurements. The simulation results reveal that the PST can estimate the SoC with accuracy above 95% without experiencing divergence.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1466
Kerem Bayar, Ryan McGee, Hai Yu, Dale Crombez
This study presents the utilization of the hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) approach for regenerative braking (regen) control enhancement efforts for the power split hybrid vehicle architecture. The HIL stand used in this study includes a production brake control module along with the hydraulic brake system, constituted of an accelerator/brake pedal assembly, electric vacuum booster and pump, brake hydraulic circuit and four brake calipers. This work presents the validation of this HIL simulator with real vehicle data, during mild and heavy braking. Then by using the HIL approach, regen control is enhanced, specifically for two cases. The first case is the jerk in deceleration caused by the brake booster delay, during transitions from regen to friction braking. As an example, the case where the regen is ramped out at a low speed threshold, and the hydraulic braking ramped in, can be considered. During this transition, due to the communication delay and the delay associated with booster dynamics, the regen ramp out and hydraulic braking ramp in are not perfectly synchronized, which can cause a jerk in deceleration.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0569
Fred Sciance, Brian Nelson, Mahmoud Yassine, Angelo Patti, Leela Rao
Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) have collaborated over the past two years to develop an efficiency test for mobile air conditioner (MAC) systems. Because the effect of efficiency differences between different MAC systems and different technologies is relatively small compared to overall vehicle fuel consumption, quantifying these differences has been challenging. The objective of this program was to develop a single dynamic test procedure that is capable of discerning small efficiency differences, and is generally representative of mobile air conditioner usage in the United States. The test was designed to be conducted in existing test facilities, using existing equipment, and within a sufficiently short time to fit standard test facility scheduling. Representative ambient climate conditions for the U.S. were chosen, as well as other test parameters, and a solar load was included. The procedure was then performed by the OEMs on a wide range of vehicles to assess repeatability, accuracy, and other parameters.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0918
Liangjun Hu, Harold Sun, Jianwen Yi, Eric Curtis, Anthony Morelli, Jizhong Zhang, Ben Zhao, Ce Yang, Xin Shi, Shangtao Liu
Variable nozzle turbine (VNT) technology has become a popular technology for diesel engine application. To pivot the nozzle vane and adjust the turbine operating condition, nozzle clearances are inevitable on both the hub and shroud side of turbine housing. Leakage flow formed inside the nozzle clearance leads to extra flow loss and makes the nozzle exit flow less uniform, thus further affects downstream aerodynamic performance of the rotor. As the leakage mixing with nozzle wake flow, the process is highly unsteady, which increases the fluctuation amplitude of transient load on the rotating turbine wheels. In present paper, firstly steady CFD analysis of a turbocharger turbine was performed at different nozzle openings. Then unsteady simulation of the turbine was carried out to investigate the interaction between the leakage flow through nozzle clearance and the main flow. Nozzle clearance's effect on turbine performance was investigated. It was found that the leakage flow not only leads to pressure loss in nozzle vane passages, but also creates mixing loss as nozzle leakage flow merging with main flow in turbine wheels.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1092
Anand Krishnasamy, Rolf D. Reitz, Werner Willems, Eric Kurtz
Diesel fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbons. Since modeling their combustion characteristics with the inclusion of all hydrocarbon species is not feasible, a hybrid surrogate model approach is used in the present work to represent the physical and chemical properties of three different diesel fuels by using up to 13 and 4 separate hydrocarbon species, respectively. The surrogates are arrived at by matching their distillation profiles and important properties with the real fuel, while the chemistry surrogates are arrived at by using a Group Chemistry Representation (GCR) method wherein the hydrocarbon species in the physical property surrogates are grouped based on their chemical classes, and the chemistry of each class is represented by using up to two hydrocarbon species. The developed surrogate models were applied to predict conventional and low temperature combustion (LTC) characteristics of the three fuels in a single cylinder diesel engine using the KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN code incorporated with a “MultiChem” mechanism having 120 species and 459 reactions.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0644
Kyoo Sil Choi, Dongsheng Li, Xin Sun, Mei Li, John Allison
In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1630
Wei Chen, Daniel Madison, Paul Dice, Jeffrey Naber, Bo Chen, Scott Miers, Michael Czekala, Chris Glugla, Qiuping Qu, Garlan Huberts
For spark-ignition gasoline engines operating under the wide speed and load conditions required for light duty vehicles, ignition quality limits the ability to minimize fuel consumption and NOx emissions via dilution under light and part load conditions. In addition, during transients including tip-outs, high levels of dilution can occur for multiple combustion events before either the external exhaust gas can be adjusted and cleared from the intake or cam phasing can be adjusted for correct internal dilution. Further improvement and a thorough understanding of the impact of the ignition system on combustion near the dilution limit will enable reduced fuel consumption and robust transient operation. To determine and isolate the effects of multiple parameters, a variable output ignition system (VOIS) was developed and tested on a 3.5L turbocharged V6 homogeneous charge direct-injection gasoline engine with two spark plug gaps and three ignition settings. External exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was used to explore combustion near dilution limits with various ignition system configurations.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1057
Johanna Dolch, Aaron Reek, Gerard Glinsky, Dominic Dicicco, Valerie Ughetta
In order to meet more stringent evaporative emissions requirements, multiple advancements in vehicle fuel system and carbon canister technologies have been made. Regardless of technological advancements, the vapor pressure of the fuel remains a vital property in controlling evaporative emissions. A series of tests were performed to explore the effects of vapor pressure on multiday diurnal evaporative emissions for 9 and 10 psi Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) 10% ethanol (E10) gasoline-blend fuels, followed by tests with 7 psi RVP E10 gasoline on a subset of the same vehicles. A test procedure was developed to monitor evaporative emissions, canister loading profiles and breakthrough emissions for each of the fuels. A total of five vehicles were tested on all 3 fuels, blended to represent 7, 9, and 10 psi at sea level. Tests were run over 14 days using the United States (U.S.) Federal Diurnal Cycle (72°F to 96°F) in a Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination (SHED) at a test facility in Colorado.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1297
John Nunan, Jason Lupescu, Gregory Denison, Douglas Ball, David Moser
In-line hydrocarbon (HC) traps are not widely used to reduce HC emissions due to their limited durability, high platinum group metal (PGM) concentrations, complicated processing, and insufficient hydrocarbon (HC) retention temperatures required for efficient conversion by the three-way catalyst component. New trapping materials and system architectures were developed utilizing an engine dynamometer test equipped with dual Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometers for tracking the adsorption and desorption of various HC species during the light-off period. Parallel laboratory reactor studies were conducted which show that the new HC trap formulations extend the traditional adsorption processes (i.e., based on physic-sorption and/or adsorption at acid sites) to chemical reaction mechanisms resulting in oligomerized, dehydro-cyclization, and partial coke formation. This results in the initially adsorbed hydrocarbons being retained in the HC trap to sufficiently high temperatures for effective combustion via the three-way-catalyst (TWC) over-layer.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0361
Michael P. Kirk, Thomas D'Anna, William Seldon, Andreas Perakes, Craig Ross
As vehicle fuel economy continues to grow in importance, the ability to accurately measure the level of efficiency on all driveline components is required. A standardized test procedure enables manufacturers and suppliers to measure component losses consistently and provides data to make comparisons. In addition, the procedure offers a reliable process to assess enablers for efficiency improvements. Previous published studies have outlined the development of a comprehensive test procedure to measure transfer case speed-dependent parasitic losses at key speed, load, and environmental conditions. This paper will take the same basic approach for the Power Transfer Units (PTUs) used on Front Wheel Drive (FWD) based All Wheel Drive (AWD) vehicles. Factors included in the assessment include single and multi-stage PTUs, fluid levels, break-in process, and temperature effects. The resultant procedure is proposed as a new SAE J-standard (Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice) for release by the AWD Standards Committee.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0978
Robert C. McCune, Joy Forsmark, Brian Schneider, Alan Luo, Helen Gu, William Schumacher, Xi Chen, Florina Vartolas
Corrosion tendency is one of the major inhibitors for increased use of magnesium alloys in automotive structural applications. Moreover, systematic or standardized methods for evaluation of both general and galvanic corrosion of magnesium alloys, either as individual components or eventually as entire subassemblies, remains elusive, and receives little attention from professional and standardization bodies. This work reports outcomes from an effort underway within the U.S. Automotive Materials Partnership - ‘USAMP’ (Chrysler, Ford and GM) directed toward enabling technologies and knowledge base for the design and fabrication of magnesium-intensive subassemblies intended for automotive “front end” applications. In particular, subassemblies consisting of three different grades of magnesium (die cast, sheet and extrusion) and receiving a typical corrosion protective coating were subjected to cyclic corrosion tests as employed by each OEM in the consortium. Results of these tests are compared.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1386
Zhenfei Zhan, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
Finite Element (FE) models are widely used in automotive for vehicle design. Even with increasing speed of computers, the simulation of high fidelity FE models is still too time-consuming to perform direct design optimization. As a result, response surface models (RSMs) are commonly used as surrogates of the FE models to reduce the turn-around time. However, RSM may introduce additional sources of uncertainty, such as model bias, and so on. The uncertainty and model bias will affect the trustworthiness of design decisions in design processes. This calls for the development of stochastic model interpolation and extrapolation methods that can address the discrepancy between the RSM and the FE results, and provide prediction intervals of model responses under uncertainty. This paper investigates and compares three stochastic methods for model interpolation and extrapolation, and they are: (1) Bayesian inference-based method, (2) Gaussian process modeling-based method, and (3) Copula-based method, and several validation metrics are proposed to evaluate the prediction results.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1387
Zhimin Xi, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
Model validation is a process of determining the degree to which a model is an accurate representation of the real world from the perspective of the intended uses of the model. In reliability based design, the intended use of the model is to identify an optimal design with the minimum cost function while satisfying all reliability constraints. It is pivotal that computational models should be validated before conducting the reliability based design. This paper presents an ensemble approach for model bias prediction in order to correct predictions of computational models. The basic idea is to first characterize the model bias of computational models, then correct the model prediction by adding the characterized model bias. The ensemble approach is composed of two prediction mechanisms: 1) response surface of model bias, and 2) Copula modeling of a series of relationships between design variables and the model bias, between model prediction and the model bias. Advantages of both mechanisms are utilized with an accuracy based weighting approach.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1118
Marcin Marek Okarmus, Rifat Keribar, Diana-Lucinia Dascalescu, Rob Zdrodowski
The helical spring is one of fundamental mechanical elements used in various industrial applications such as valves, suspension mechanisms, shock and vibration absorbers, hand levers, etc. In high speed applications, for instance in the internal combustion engine or in reciprocating compressor valves, helical springs are subjected to dynamic and impact loading, which can result in a phenomenon called “surge”. Hence, proper design and selection of helical springs should consider modeling the dynamic and impact response. In order to correctly characterize the physics of a helical spring and its response to dynamic excitations, a comprehensive model of spring elasticity for various spring coil and wire geometries, spring inertial effects as well as contacts between the windings leading to a non-linear spring force behavior is required. In practical applications, such models are utilized in parametric design and optimization studies. For that reason, computational efficiency is also a key requirement.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1557
Jonathan Bushkuhl, William Silvis, Joseph Szente, Matti Maricq
Pending reductions in light duty vehicle PM emissions standards from 10 to 3 mg/mi and below will push the limits of the gravimetric measurement method. At these levels the PM mass collected approaches the mass of non-particle gaseous species that adsorb onto the filter from exhaust and ambient air. This introduces an intrinsic lower limit to filter based measurement that is independent of improvements achieved in weighing metrology. The statistical variability of back-up filter measurements at these levels makes them an ineffective means for correcting the adsorption artifact. The proposed subtraction of a facility based estimate of the artifact will partially alleviate the mass bias from adsorption, but its impact on weighing variability remains a problem that can reach a significant fraction of the upcoming 3 and future 1 mg/mi standards. This paper proposes an improved PM mass method that combines the gravimetric filter approach with real time aerosol measurement. In this work we employ a photoacoustic soot sensor (PASS), which achieves a substantially better detection limit than filter weighing.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1594
Jaclyn Johnson, Hai-Wen Ge, Jeffrey Naber, Seong-Young Lee, Eric Kurtz, Nan Robarge
Diesel combustion and emissions formation is spray and mixing controlled and understanding spray parameters is key to determining the impact of fuel injector operation and nozzle design on combustion and emissions. In this study, both spray visualization and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling were undertaken to investigate key mechanisms for liquid length fluctuations. For the experimental portion of this study a common rail piezoelectric injector was tested in an optically accessible constant volume combustion vessel. Liquid penetration of the spray was determined via processing of images acquired from Mie back scattering under vaporizing conditions by injecting into a charge gas at elevated temperature with a 0% oxygen environment. Tests were undertaken at a gas density of 34.8 kg/m₃, 2000 bar injection pressure, and at ambient temperatures of 900, 1100, and 1300 K. Under these conditions there are noticeable fluctuations in liquid phase penetration once the steady state liquid length has been established, on the order of 10% of the mean liquid length.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1627
Anqi Zhang, Khanh Cung, Seong-Young Lee, Jeffrey Naber, Garlan Huberts, Michael Czekala, Qiuping Qu
An operational scheme with fuel-lean and exhaust gas dilution in spark-ignited engines increases thermal efficiency and decreases NOx emission, while these operations inherently induce combustion instability and thus large cycle-to-cycle variation in engine. In order to stabilize combustion variations, the development of an advanced ignition system is becoming critical. To quantify the impact of spark-ignition discharge, ignitability tests were conducted in an optically accessible combustion vessel to characterize the flame kernel development of lean methane-air mixture with CO₂ simulating exhaust diluent. A shrouded fan was used to generate turbulence in the vicinity of J-gap spark plug and a Variable Output Ignition System (VOIS) capable of producing a varied set of spark discharge patterns was developed and used as an ignition source. The main feature of the VOIS is to vary the secondary current during glow discharge including naturally decaying and truncated with multiple strikes.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1659
Arsham J. Shahlari, Chris Hocking, Eric Kurtz, Jaal Ghandhi
Many combustion researchers use peak pressure rise rate or ringing intensity to indicate combustion noise in lieu of microphone data or using a combustion noise meter that simulates the attenuation characteristics of the engine structure. In this paper, peak pressure rise rate and ringing intensity are compared to combustion noise using a fully documented algorithm similar to the ones used by combustion noise meters. Data from multiple engines operating under several low-temperature combustion strategies were analyzed. The results suggest that neither peak pressure rise rate nor ringing intensity provides a direct correlation to engine noise over a wide range of operating conditions. Moreover, the estimation of both metrics is often accompanied by the filtering of the pressure data, which changes the absolute value of the results. Thus, all ringing intensity and peak pressure rise rate data should be provided with the filter characteristics to allow an independent assessment of the noise potential.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-1036
Richard A. Scholer, Michael Bourton, Dan Mepham, Arindam Maitra, Tim Godfrey, Doug Oliver, Donthy Venkatesh, Eloi Taha, Michael Muller, Cliff Fietzek
This paper is the third in the series of documents designed to record the progress on the SAE Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) communication task force. The initial paper (2010-01-0837) introduced utility communications (J2836/1™ & J2847/1) and how the SAE task force interfaced with other organizations. The second paper (2011-01-0866) focused on the next steps of the utility requirements and added DC charging (J2836/2™ & J2847/2) along with initial effort for Reverse Power Flow (J2836/3™ & J2847/3). This paper continues with the following: 1. Completion of DC charging's 1st step publication of J2836/2™ & J2847/2. 2. Completion of 1st step of communication requirements as it relates to PowerLine Carrier (PLC) captured in J2931/1. This leads to testing of PLC products for Utility and DC charging messages using EPRI's test plan and schedule. 3. Progress for PEV communications interoperability in J2953/1. The Use cases, general information and architecture are also being developed and/or updated for the following. 4.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0148
Wan Mohd Faizal Wan Mahmood, Antonino LaRocca, Paul J. Shayler, Fabrizio Bonatesta, Ian Pegg
Soot formation and distribution inside the cylinder of a light-duty direct injection diesel engine, have been predicted using Kiva-3v CFD software. Pathlines of soot particles traced from specific in-cylinder locations and crank angle instants have been explored using the results for cylinder charge motion predicted by the Kiva-3v code. Pathlines are determined assuming soot particles are massless and follow charge motion. Coagulation and agglomeration have not been taken into account. High rates of soot formation dominate during and just after the injection. Oxidation becomes dominant after the injection has terminated and throughout the power stroke. Computed soot pathlines show that soot particles formed just below the fuel spray axis during the early injection period are more likely to travel to the cylinder wall boundary layer. Soot particles above the fuel spray have lesser tendency to be conveyed to the cylinder wall. The upper part of the cylinder liner seems to be the most vulnerable to soot transfer to the wall layer.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0697
David J. MacMillan, Theo Law, Paul J. Shayler, Ian Pegg
The effect of compression ratio on sensitivity to changes in start of injection and air-fuel ratio has been investigated on a single-cylinder DI diesel engine at fixed low and medium speeds and loads. Compression ratio was set to 17.9:1 or 13.7:1 by using pistons with different bowl sizes. Injection timing and air-to-fuel ratio were swept around a nominal map point at which gross IMEP and NO x values were matched for the two compression ratios. It was found that CO, HC and ISFC were higher at low compression ratio, but the soot/NO x trade-off improved and this could be exploited to reduce the fuel economy penalty. Sensitivity to inputs is generally similar, but high compression ratio tended to have steeper response gradients. Reducing compression ratio to 13.7 gave rise to a marked degradation of performance at light load, producing high CO emissions and a fall in combustion efficiency. This could be eased by reducing rail pressure, but the advantage in smoke emission was lost.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0371
Gang Guo, Douglas Dobson, James Warner, William Ruona, Christine Lambert
U.S. federal vehicle emission standards effective in 2007 require tight control of NOx and hydrocarbon emissions. For light-duty vehicles, the current standard of Tier 2 Bin 5 is about 0.07 g/mi NOx and 0.09 g/mi NMOG (non-methane organic gases) at 120,000 mi. However, the proposed future standard is 0.03 g/mi for NMOG + NOx (~SULEV30) at 150,000 mi. There is a significant improvement needed in catalyst system efficiencies for diesel vehicles to achieve the future standard, mainly during cold start. In this study, a less than 6000 lbs diesel truck equipped with an advanced urea Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system was used to pursue lower tailpipe emissions with an emphasis on vehicle calibration and catalyst package. The calibration was tuned by optimizing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) fuel injection and cold start strategy to generate desirable engine-out emissions balanced with reasonable temperatures. Major catalyst components were diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) followed by SCR catalysts, SCR-coated filter and ammonia slip catalyst.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0364
Mehdi Abarham, Tejas Chafekar, John Hoard, Daniel Styles, Dennis Assanis
Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) coolers are commonly used in diesel engines to reduce the temperature of recirculated exhaust gases in order to reduce NOx emissions. The presence of a cool surface in the hot exhaust causes particulate soot deposition as well as hydrocarbon and water condensation. Fouling experienced through deposition of particulate matter and hydrocarbons results in degraded cooler effectiveness and increased pressure drop. In this study, a visualization test setup is designed and constructed so that the effect of water condensation on the deposit formation and growth at various coolant temperatures can be studied. A water-cooled surrogate rectangular channel is employed to represent the EGR cooler. One side of the channel is made of glass for visualization purposes. A medium duty diesel engine is used to generate the exhaust stream. An automated system controls all critical parameters including gas inlet temperature and pressure, coolant temperature, and the exhaust flow rate to correlate laminar, transition, and turbulent flow regimes in the channel.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-1328
Theo Law, David MacMillan, Paul J. Shayler, Geoff Kirk, Ian Pegg, Roland Stark
The largest contribution to engine rubbing friction is made by the piston and piston rings running in the cylinder liner. The magnitude and characteristics of the friction behaviour and the influence on these of factors such as surface roughness, piston design and lubricant properties are of keen interest. Investigating presents experimental challenges, including potential problems of uncontrolled build-to-build variability when component changes are made. These are addressed in the design of a new motored piston and floating liner rig. The design constrains transverse movement of a single liner using cantilevered mounts at the top and bottom. The mounts and two high stiffness strain gauged load cells constrain vertical movement. The outputs of the load cells are processed to extract the force contribution associated with friction. The liner, piston and crankshaft parts were taken from a EuroV-compliant, HPCR diesel engine with a swept capacity of 550cc per cylinder. Cooling, lubrication and an air injection system for cylinder pressure regulation are described.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0228
Zhimin Xi, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
Analytical models (math or computer simulation models) are typically built on the basis of many assumptions and simplifications and hence model prediction could be inaccurate in intended applications. Model validation is thus critical to quantify and improve the degree of accuracy of these models. So far, little work considers model validation for various design configurations so that model prediction is accurate in the intended design space. Furthermore, there is a lack of effective approaches that can be used to quantify model accuracy considering different number of experimental data. To overcome these limitations, objective of this paper is to develop a model validation approach for various design configurations with a reference metric for model accuracy check considering different number of experimental data. Three technical components are proposed to accomplish this goal including: 1) a validation metric using the Bhattacharya distance (B-distance) for model accuracy check with different number of experimental data; 2) the Maximum Entropy Principle (MEP) method for accurate characterization of the model bias; and 3) an approach for constructing response surface of the model bias and accurately predicting system performances in the intended design space.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-1071
Michael McGhee, Paul J. Shayler, Antonino LaRocca, Michael Murphy, Ian Pegg
Experimental studies have been undertaken on a single-cylinder HPCR diesel engine with a compression ratio of 15.5:1 to explore the effect of fuel injection strategy on cycle by cycle stability. The influence of the number, separation and quantity of pilot injections on the coefficient of variation of IMEP has been investigated at -20°C, 1000 rev/min, post-start idling conditions. Injection strategy and glow plug temperature trade-off has also been investigated at a range of soak temperatures. Up to four pilot injections have been used. For timing of the main injection near to the optimum, CoVIMEP values of 10% or better can be achieved. Closer spacing of injections improved stability and extended the range of timings to meet target stability. The best combinations of pilot number and pilot quantity varied with total fuel delivered. For a 20 mg/cycle total, twin-pilot injections delivering a total pilot fuel of 4 mg/cycle, or three or four delivering a total pilot fuel of 4 mg/cycle or 6 mg/cycle, gave best stability, but at lower total fuelling (16 mg/cycle) stability was not so good and achieved by fewer combinations.
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