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Viewing 1 to 30 of 1535
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1781
Joshua Wheeler
Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Hands Free Communication (HFC) capabilities have become prominent in the automotive industry, with over 50% of new vehicle sales equipped with some level of ASR system. With the common use of mobile personal assistants and smartphones with Bluetooth capability, customer expectations for built in ASR and HFC systems have increased significantly. The performance of these ASR and HFC systems are highly dependent on the level of background or “masking” noise that competes with the speech engine’s ability to correctly convert the driver’s speech to actionable commands. HVAC noise provides high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that affects the signal to noise ratio (SNR) within the vehicle cabin, and works to mask the user’s speech. Furthermore, when the airflow from the panel or defroster vents are directed toward the vehicle microphone, a mechanical “buffeting” phenomenon occurs that distresses the ASR system even further.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1864
Joshua Wheeler
Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Hands Free Communication (HFC) capabilities have become prominent in the automotive industry, with over 50% of new vehicle sales equipped with some level of ASR system. With the common use of mobile personal assistants and smartphones with Bluetooth capability, customer expectations for built in ASR and HFC systems have increased significantly. The performance of these ASR and HFC systems are highly dependent on the level of background or “masking” noise that competes with the speech engine’s ability to correctly convert the driver’s speech to actionable commands. HVAC noise and environmental noise (like road and wind noise) provide high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that affects the signal to noise ratio (SNR) within the vehicle cabin, and work to mask the user’s speech. Managing this noise is a vital key to building a vehicle that meets the customer’s expectations for ASR and HFC performance.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1796
Rick D. Dehner, Ahmet Selamet, Michael Steiger, Keith Miazgowicz, Ahsanul Karim
Ported shroud compressor covers recirculate low momentum air near the inducer blade tips, and the use of these devices has traditionally been confined to extending the low-flow operating region at elevated rotational speeds for compressors on compression-ignition engines. Implementation of ported shrouds on compressors for spark-ignition (SI) engines has been generally avoided due to operation at pressure ratios below the region where ported shrouds improve low-flow range, the slight efficiency penalty, and the perception of increased noise. The present study provides experimental performance and acoustic results for a SI engine turbocharger compressor both with and without (baseline) a ported shroud. The objective of implementing the ported shroud was to reduce mid-flow range broadband whoosh noise of the baseline compressor over 4-12 kHz.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1798
Jiri Navratil, Warren Seeley, Peng Wang, Shriram Siravara
The ability to predict exhaust system acoustics including transmission loss (TL) and tailpipe noise accurately based on CAD geometry has long been a requirement of most OEM’s and Tier 1 exhaust suppliers. Correlation to measurement data has been problematic under various operating conditions including flow. This study was undertaken to address and identify the critical dimensions and modeling sensitivities. Ford uses Ricardo WAVE as one of their 1-D NVH tools, which was chosen for the purpose of this benchmark study. The vibro-acoustics group at University of Kentucky Department of Mechanical Engineering (UKME) has extensive experience in using 3D and 1D acoustic modeling tools for exhaust components and in correlating the numerical predictions to measurements. The most commonly used metrics for evaluating the acoustical performance of mufflers are insertion loss (IL), transmission loss (TL), and noise reduction (NR).
2017-04-11
Journal Article
2017-01-9175
Yitao Zhu, Makarand Datar, Kalyan Addepalli, Natalie Remisoski
Nowadays, the vehicle design is highly ruled by the increasing customer demands and expectations. In addition to ride comfort and vehicle handling, the Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH) behavior of the powertrain is also a critical factor that has a big impact on the customer experience. To evaluate the powertrain NVH characteristics, the NVH error states should be studied. A typical NVH event could be decoupled into 3 parts: source, path, and receiver. Take-off shudder, which evaluates the NVH severity level during vehicle take-off, is one of the most important NVH error states. The main sources of Front Wheel Drive (FWD) take-off shudder are the plunging Constant Velocity Joints (CVJ) on the left and right half shafts. This is because a plunging CVJ generates a third order plunging force with half shaft Revolution Per Minute (RPM), which is along the slip of the plunging CVJ.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0231
Shih-Po Lin, Yijung Chen, Danielle Zeng, Xuming Su
In the conventional approach, the material properties of laminate composites for crash simulations are typically obtained from standard coupon tests, where the test results only provide single layer material properties. However, the lay-up effects for the failure behaviors of the real structure were not considered in numerical simulations. Hence, there was discrepancy between the crash simulations and experimental tests. Consequently, an intermediate stage is required for accurate predictions. Some component tests are required to calibrate the material models in the intermediate stage. In this paper, a laminate cylinder tube under high-impact velocity in the direction of tube axis is chosen as an example for the crash analysis. The tube consists of 24 layers of uni-directional (UD) carbon fiber composite materials, in which 4 layers are perpendicular to, while the other layers are parallel to the impact direction.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1227
Ali Najmabadi, Michael Kress, Brett Dryer, Ahmad Arshan Khan
Abstract This paper studies different switching schemes for loss reduction in a traction motor drive. The system under examination is composed of a battery, a 2 level Voltage Source Inverter, and an Interior Permanent Magnet motor. Discontinuous PWM (DPWM) control strategy is widely used in this type of motor drive for the reduction of losses. In some publications, the effect of the DPWM modulation scheme is compared to the reduction of the switching frequency which can also cause a reduction in switching losses of the inverter. Extensive studies have examined the effect of variation of the switching frequency on the motor and inverter losses. However, the effect of applying both switching schemes simultaneously has not been explored. This paper will use a system that is operated at a fixed switching frequency as the baseline. Afterwards, three different switching schemes will be studied and compared to the baseline.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1136
Jack S.P. Liu, Natalie Remisoski, Javed Iqbal, Robert Egenolf
Automotive vehicles equipped with Cardan joints may experience low frequency vehicle launch shudder vibration (5-30Hz) and high frequency driveline moan vibration (80-200Hz) under working angles and speeds. The Cardan joint introduces a 2nd order driveshaft speed variation and a 4th order joint articulation torque (JAT) causing the vehicle shudder and moan NVH issues. Research on the Cardan joint induced low frequency vehicle shudder using a Multi-Body System (MBS) method has been attempted. A comprehensive MBS method to predict Cardan joint induced high frequency driveline moan vibration is yet to be developed. This paper presents a hybrid MBS and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) approach to predict Cardan joint induced high frequency driveshaft moan vibration. The CAE method considers the elastically coupled driveshaft bending and engine block vibration due to Cardan joint excitation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1140
Yang Xu, Yuji Fujii, Edward Dai, James McCallum, Gregory Pietron, Guang Wu, Hong Jiang
Abstract A transmission system model is developed at various complexities in order to capture the transient behaviors in drivability and fuel economy simulations. A large number of model parameters bring more degree of freedom to correlate with vehicular test data. However, in practice, it requires extensive time and effort to tune the parameters to satisfy the model performance requirements. Among the transmission model, a hydraulic clutch actuator plays a critical role in transient shift simulations. It is particularly difficult to tune the actuator model when it is over-parameterized. Therefore, it is of great importance to develop a hydraulic actuator model that is easy to adjust while retaining sufficient complexity for replicating realistic transient behaviors. This paper describes a systematic approach for reducing the hydraulic actuator model into a piecewise 1st order representation based on piston movement.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1176
Hafiz S. Khafagy
Abstract Auto stop-start (Engine stop-start, ESS) has become a widely used feature to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions particularly in congested cities. Typically, vehicles equipped with such systems include two DC power sources that are coupled in parallel: a primary and a secondary power source. The primary power source supplies energy to the starter to crank the engine, while the secondary power source supplies energy to the rest of the vehicle electric loads. During an auto-stop event, a controllable switch decouples the two power sources. Moreover, operating current, voltage and the State of Charge (SOC) are monitored to ensure enough energy for the next auto-start event. When any of these operating parameters are below the threshold values, the controllable switch opens to isolate the two batteries and then the engine is automatically started.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1104
William D. Dunham, Jinwoo Seok, Weitian Chen, Edward Dai, Ilya Kolmanovsky, Anouck Girard
Abstract The efficiency of power transmission through a Van Doorne type Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) can be improved by allowing a small amount of relative slip between the engine and driveline side pulleys. However, excessive slip must be avoided to prevent transmission wear and damage. To enable fuel economy improvements without compromising drivability, a CVT control system must ensure accurate tracking of the gear ratio set-point while satisfying pointwise-in-time constraints on the slip, enforcing limits on the pulley forces, and counteracting driveline side and engine side disturbances. In this paper, the CVT control problem is approached from the perspective of Model Predictive Control (MPC). To develop an MPC controller, a low order nonlinear model of the CVT is established. This model is linearized at a selected operating point, and the resulting linear model is extended with extra states to ensure zero steady-state error when tracking constant set-points.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1300
Raj Jayachandran, Bhimaraddi Alavandi, Matt Niesluchowski, Erika Low, Yafang Miao, Yi Zhang
Abstract An engine cooling system in an automotive vehicle comprises of heat exchangers such as a radiator, charge air cooler and oil coolers along with engine cooling fan. Typical automotive engine-cooling fan assembly includes an electric motor mounted on a shroud that encloses the radiator core. One of main drivers of fan shroud design is Noise, Vibration, and Harshness (NVH) requirements without compromising the main function of airflow for cooling requirements. In addition, there is also a minimum stiffness requirement of fan shroud which is often overlooked in arriving at optimal design of it. Low Speed Damageability (LSD) assessment of an automotive vehicle is about minimizing the cost of repair of vehicle damages in low speed crashes. In low speed accidents, these fan motors are subjected to sudden decelerations which cause fan motors to swing forward thereby damaging the radiator core. So designing fan shroud for low speed damageability is of importance today.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1058
L.V. Pavan Kumar Maddula, Ibrahim Awara
Abstract Increased focus on fuel efficiency and vehicle emissions has led the automotive industry to look into low weight alternative designs for powertrain system components. These new design changes pose challenges to vehicle attributes like NVH, durability, etc. Further, the requirement of high power applications produces even more complexities. The present work explains how a potential design change of half shafts driven by a desire to reduce weight and cost can lead to NVH problems caused by half shaft resonances and explains how using multiple dynamic vibration absorbers can solve the issue to meet customer expectation while improving efficiency. With the aid of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) & optimization software, interactions between multiple DVA’s on a system was understood and optimal damper parameters for effective damping was identified. The final DVA design was tested and verified on the vehicle for optimal attribute performance.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1195
Masahiro Kimoto
Abstract SAE standards require the function of a Manual Service Disconnect (MSD), when open, to remove any voltage between positive and negative Rechargeable Energy Storage System (RESS) output terminals. Another SAE standard specifies that measured voltage across all external battery terminal sets shall be less than 60 VDC within 5 seconds after the manual disconnect is actuated with the automatic disconnect (e.g., contactors) closed. In this paper, the location of the manual service disconnect is reviewed to meet isolation requirement of the battery pack system (i.e., RESS). Battery architectures with manual service disconnect located at the most positive side, most negative side, and center of the array or the pack were studied. Voltage measurement points and single point failure modes were considered. It was found that MSD location for a single contactor pack is most effective in reducing voltage potential at the terminals when placed on the other side of the contactor.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1190
Patrick Maguire, Hyung Baek, Stephen Liptak, Olivia Lomax, Rodolfo Palma, Yi Zhang
Abstract As electrified powertrains proliferate through original equipment manufacturer vehicle offerings, the focus on system cost and weight reduction intensifies. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a High Voltage (HV) battery system enclosure molded from High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) to deliver substantial cost and weight opportunities. While previous HV battery system enclosure alternatives to steel and aluminum focus on thermoset composites and glass filled polypropylene, this solution leverages select HDPE design techniques established for fuel tanks and applies them to an HV battery system. The result is a tough, energy absorbing structure, capable of hermetic sealing, which simplifies manufacturing by eliminating nearly all fasteners.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1210
R. Dyche Anderson, Regan Zane, Gregory Plett, Dragan Maksimovic, Kandler Smith, M. Scott Trimboli
Abstract A new cell balancing technology was developed under a Department of Energy contract which merges the DC/DC converter function into cell balancing. Instead of conventional passive cell balancing technology which bypasses current through a resistor, or active cell balancing which moves current from one cell to another, with significant cost and additional inefficiencies, this concept takes variable amount of current from each cell or small group of cells and converts it to current for the low voltage system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1208
Kristin R. Cooney
Abstract This paper will discuss a compliance demonstration methodology for UN38.3, an international regulation which includes a series of tests that, when successfully met, ensure that lithium metal and lithium ion batteries can be safely transported. Many battery safety regulations, such as FMVSS and ECE, include post-crash criteria that are clearly defined. UN38.3 is unique in that the severity of the tests drove changes to battery design and function. Another unique aspect of UN38.3 is that the regulatory language can lead to different interpretations on how to run the tests and apply pass/fail criteria; there is enough ambiguity that the tests could be run very differently yet all meet the actual wording of the regulation. A process was created detailing exactly how to run the tests to improve consistency among test engineers. As part of this exercise, several tools were created which assist in generating a test plan that complies with the UN38.3 regulation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1202
Ben Tabatowski-Bush
Abstract The Battery Monitoring Integrated Circuit (BMIC) is a key technology for Battery Electronics in the electrification of vehicles. Generally speaking, every production hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicle uses some type of BMIC to monitor the voltage of each lithium battery cell. In order to achieve Functional Safety for the traction battery packs for these electrified vehicles, most designs require higher ASIL ratings for the BMIC such as C or D. For the entire market of available BMIC’s, there is a generic feature set that can be found on almost every IC on the market, such as a front end multiplexer, one or more precision references, one or more Analog to Digital (A/D) converters, a power supply, communications circuits, and window comparators. There is also a fairly consistent suite of self-diagnostics, available on just about every available BMIC, to detect failures and enable achievement of the appropriate ASIL rating.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1233
Mohamed A. Elshaer, Allan Gale, Chingchi Chen
Abstract Vehicle safety is of paramount importance when it comes to plugging the vehicle into the electric utility grid. The impact of high voltage ground fault has been neglected or, if not, addressed by guidelines extracted from general practices, written in international standards. The agile accretion in Electric Vehicle (EV) development deems an exhaustive study on safety risks pertaining to fault occurrence. While vehicle electrification offers a vital solution to oil scarcity, it is essential that the fast development of the number of electric vehicles on the road does not compromise safety. Meanwhile, the link between technology and demands of society must be governed by vehicle safety. In this paper, a comprehensive study on high voltage (HV) fault conditions occurring in an EV will be conducted. In the next decade, EVs are expected to be prevalent worldwide. Ground fault characteristics are significantly dependent on the earthing system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1230
Cyrille Goldstein, Joel Hetrick
Abstract Mechanical losses in electric machines can contribute significantly to overall system losses in an electric drive [1]. With a permanent magnet synchronous machine (PMSM), measuring mechanical losses is difficult without an un-magnetized rotor. Even with an un-magnetized rotor, physical testing can be time consuming and expensive. This paper presents a simple theoretical model of mechanical drag in an electric machine. The model was built using calculations for bearing, seal, and windage drag and was compared to experimental results from testing with un-magnetized motors. Based on this information, the model was modified to better represent the physical system. The goal of this work is to understand the contributors to mechanical drag, to be able to estimate mechanical losses without physical testing, and to be able to quickly evaluate design choices that could reduce mechanical losses.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1220
Ahmad Arshan Khan
Abstract In an interior permanent magnet machine, magnet temperature plays a critical role in determining optimal current control trajectory. Monitoring magnet temperature is a challenging task. In lab and various specialized applications, infrared sensors or thermocouples are used to measure the temperature. But it adds cost, maintenance issues and their integration to electric machine drives could be complicated. To tackle issues due to sensor based methods, various sensorless model based approaches are proposed in the literature recently such as flux observer, high-frequency signal injection, and thermal models, etc. Although magnet temperature monitoring received a lot of attention of researchers, very few papers give a detailed overview of the effects of magnet temperature on motor control from a controls perspective. This paper discusses the impact of magnet temperature variation on Maximum Torque per Ampere control and Flux Weakening Control trajectory.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1247
Mohammed Khorshed Alam, Lihua Chen, Yan Zhou, Fan Xu, Shuitao Yang
Abstract Direct bypass to DC-DC boost converter in traction inverter increases converter's capability and efficiency significantly by providing a lower loss path for power flow between the battery and DC-link terminal. A bypass using diode is an excellent solution to achieve this capability at low cost and system complexity. Bypass diode operates in the linear operating region (DC Q-point) when the battery discharges through the bypass diode to drive the electric motors. Therefore, thermal stress on the DC-link capacitor is shared between the input and DC-link capacitors through the bypass diode. On the other hand, inverters introduce voltage oscillation in the DC-link terminal which results in unwanted energy oscillation through the bypass diode during battery charging. Both of these phenomena have been explained in details.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1246
Fan Xu, Lihua Chen, Shuitao Yang, Yan Zhou, Mohammed Khorshed Alam
Abstract Power modules play a key role in traction inverters for vehicle electrification applications. The harsh automotive operating environment is a big challenge for power modules. The paper highlights the challenges for power modules usage in electrified vehicles (xEVs), and proposes a design verification procedure for such application in order to ensure the reliable operation under all conditions. First, power modules operate in all climate zones and are exposed to a wide ambient temperature range underhood from -40°C to 105°C. A typical automotive power module should therefore withstand a junction temperature from -40°C to up to 175°C without exceeding its safe operating area (SOA), e.g. avalanche breakdown voltage, maximum current, and thermal limit. Second, an inductive induced high voltage spike could be generated during the power semiconductor fast switching at high voltage and high current conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1237
Ahmad Arshan Khan, Michael J. Kress
Abstract For high performance motor controls applications such as electric vehicles, accurate motor parameter knowledge is required. Motor parameters like d-axis inductance, q-axis inductance, resistance and permanent magnet flux linkage are difficult to obtain and measure directly. These four parameters can be reduced to three parameters resistance, d-axis and q axis flux linkage. In this paper, a new scheme is proposed to approximate d-axis and q-axis flux linkage using measured torque, dq-axis measured current, and dq-axis voltage commands to the inverter. d-axis and q-axis flux linkages are estimated over a range of d-axis and q-axis currents that fully map the desired motor operation region.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1236
Shuitao Yang, Lihua Chen, Mohammed Khorshed Alam, Fan Xu, Yan Zhou
Abstract A hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) can utilize the electromechanical path to optimize the ICE operation and implement the regenerative brake, the fuel economy of a vehicle therefore gets improved significantly. Bi-directional Boost converter is usually used in an electric drive system to boost the high voltage (HV) battery voltage to a higher dc-link voltage. The main advantages for a system with Boost converter is that the traction inverter is de-coupled from battery voltage variations causing it to be over-sized. When designing this Boost converter, the switching frequency is a key parameter for the converter design. Higher switching frequency will lead to higher switching loss of power device (IGBT +diode), moreover, it has significant impact on inductor ripple current, HV battery ripple current and input capacitor current. Therefore, the switching frequency is one of the most important parameters for the design and selection of both active and passive components.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1235
Baoming Ge, Lihua Chen, Shuitao Yang
Abstract Electric vehicles (EV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) require high torque/acceleration ability and wide speed range. To meet both of them, the traction machines usually have to be oversized, which results in high volume and weight, high cost, and low efficiency. In practical application, high speed motors combining with gear box provide the expected torque and speed capability. If pole-changing machines are employed to achieve wide torque and speed ranges, gear box and motor size can be reduced in EVs/HEVs. This paper presents a pole-phase modulation motor drive which changes both of poles and phases simultaneously, as a result that the motor extends its torque/speed capability in a flexible way. Simulation results verify the principle and control method for this kind of motor drives.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1125
Victor Baumhardt, Valdinei Sczibor
Abstract Halfshafts are very important components from vehicle powertrain. They are the element responsible to transmit torque and rotation from transmission to wheels. Its most basic design consists of a solid bar with joints at each extreme. Depending of bar length, the natural frequency of first bending mode might have a modal alignment with engine second order, resulting in undesired noise on vehicle interior. Many design alternatives are available to overpass this particular situation, like adding dampers, use tube shafts or use link-shafts, however, all of them are cost affected. This study proposes an investigation to obtain an optimal profile for a solid shaft, pursuing the lowest possible frequency for the first bending mode by changing its diameter at specific regions. The study is divided in four main stages: initially, a modal analysis of a halfshaft is done at vehicle to determinate its natural frequency when assembled on vehicle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1145
Eric De Hesselle, Mark Grozde, Raymond Adamski, Thomas Rolewicz, Mark Erazo
Abstract Hybrid electric vehicles are continuously challenged to meet cross attribute performance while minimizing energy usage and component cost in a very competitive automotive market. As electrified vehicles become more mainstream in the marketplace, hybrid customers are expecting more attribute refinement in combination with the enhanced fuel economy benefits. Minimizing fuel consumption, which tends to drive hybrid powertrain engines to operate under lugging type calibrations, traditionally challenge noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) metrics. Balancing the design space to satisfy the cost metrics, energy efficiency, noise and vibration & drivability under the hybrid engine lugging conditions can be optimized through the use of multiple CAE tools. This paper describes how achieving NVH metrics can put undesirable boundaries on Powertrain Operation which could affect other performance attributes.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1475
Saeed Barbat, Xiaowei Li
Abstract On December 2015, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) published its proposal to implement U.S New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) changes covering three categories of crashworthiness, crash avoidance and pedestrian protection, beginning with the 2019 model year. The crashworthiness category included a new frontal oblique impact (OI) test protocol. The test compromises of a new Oblique Moving Deformable Barrier (OMDB), new THOR 50th percentile male (THOR-50M) anthropomorphic test device (ATD), and a new test configuration. An OMDB of 2,486 kg (5,480 lb) impacts a stationary target vehicle at a speed of 90 kph (56 mph) at an angle of 15 degrees with a 35% barrier overlap with the front end of the target vehicle. In vehicle-to-vehicle collisions, the lighter weight vehicle experience higher velocity change and higher acceleration levels, thereby, occupants in the lighter vehicle experience higher injury risk.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1474
Raed E. El-Jawahri, Agnes Kim, Dean Jaradi, Rich Ruthinowski, Kevin Siasoco, Cortney Stancato, Para Weerappuli
Abstract Sled tests simulating full-frontal rigid barrier impact were conducted using the Hybrid III 5th female and the 50th male anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). The ATDs were positioned in the outboard rear seat of a generic small car environment. Two belt configurations were used: 1) a standard belt with no load limiter or pre-tensioner and 2) a seatbelt with a 4.5 kN load-limiting retractor with a stop function and a retractor pre-tensioner (LL-PT). In the current study, the LL-PT belt system reduced the peak responses of both ATDs. Probabilities of serious-to-fatal injuries (AIS3+), based on the ATDs peak responses, were calculated using the risk curves in NHTSA’s December 2015 Request for Comments (RFC) proposing changes to the United States New Car Assessment Program (US-NCAP). Those probabilities were compared to the injury rates (IRs) observed in the field on point estimate basis.
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