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Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bert Bras, Andrew Carlile, Thomas Niemann, Sherry Mueller, Hyung Chul Kim, Timothy Wallington, Heidi McKenzie, Susan Rokosz
Abstract Tools are now publicly available that can potentially help a company assess the impact of its water use and risks in relation to their global operations and supply chains. In this paper we describe a comparative analysis of two publicly available tools, specifically the WWF/DEG Water Risk Filter and the WBCSD Global Water Tool that are used to measure the water impact and risk indicators for industrial facilities. By analyzing the risk assessments calculated by these tools for different scenarios that include varying facilities from different industries, one can better gauge the similarities and differences between these water strategy tools. Several scenarios were evaluated using the water tools, and the results are compared and contrasted. As will be shown, the results can vary significantly.
Article
2014-02-24
Rooftop solar cells and lens canopy enable the C-MAX to go 21 battery-only miles after an 8-h recharge.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Benjamin Lee, Daniel Boston, Qinpeng Wang, Godfried Augenbroe, Bert Bras, Tina Guldberg, Christiaan Paredis, Michael Tinskey, Donna Bell
In recent years, the residential and transportation sectors have made significant strides in reducing energy consumption, mainly by focusing efforts on low-hanging fruit in each sector independently. This independent viewpoint has been successful in the past because the user needs met and resources consumed in each sector have been clearly distinct. However, the trend towards vehicle electrification has blurred the boundary between the sectors. With both the home and vehicle now relying upon the same energy source, interactions between the systems can no longer be neglected. For example, when tiered utility pricing schemes are considered, the energy consumption of each system affects the cost of the other. In this paper, the authors present an integrated Home-Vehicle Simulation Model (HVSM), allowing the designer to take a holistic view. Amongst other possibilities, this model allows a designer to evaluate the economic and environmental impacts of multiple retrofit alternatives, whether they concern modifications to the home and its appliances, the vehicle, or any combination.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Dekun Pei, Michael Leamy
This paper presents a forward-looking simulation (FLS) approach for the front wheel drive (FWD) General Motors Allison Hybrid System II (GM AHS-II). The supervisory control approach is based on a dynamic programming-informed Equivalent Cost Minimization Strategy (ECMS). The controller development uses backward-looking simulations (BLS), which execute quickly by neglecting component transients while assuming exact adherence to a specified drive cycle. Since ECMS sometimes prescribes control strategies with rapid component transients, its efficacy remains unknown until these transients are modeled. This is addressed by porting the ECMS controller to a forward-looking simulation where component transients are modeled in high fidelity. Techniques of implementing the ECMS controller and commanding the various power plants in the GM AHS-II for FLS are discussed. It is shown that FLS-derived component states agree well with states commanded using the BLS-derived robust control strategy, with any difference being accounted for by transient effects.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Gina M. Magnotti, Caroline L. Genzale
It is common practice to validate diesel spray models against experimental diesel-spray images based on elastic light scattering, but the metric used to define the liquid boundary in a modeled spray can be physically inconsistent with the liquid boundary detected by light scattering measurements. In particular, spray models typically define liquid penetration based on a liquid mass threshold, while light scattering signal intensities are based on droplet size and volume fraction. These metrics have different response characteristics to changes in ambient conditions and fuel properties. Thus, when spray models are “tuned” or calibrated to match these types of measurements, the predictive capabilities of these models can be compromised. In this work, we compare two different liquid length metrics of an evaporating, non-reacting n-dodecane spray under diesel-like conditions using KIVA-3V. The first computational liquid length definition is mass-based, where the liquid length is defined as the downstream axial location where a selected percentage of the total injected mass has been encompassed (typically 95-99%).
Technical Paper
2012-10-22
Angela Lowe, Dimitri N. Mavris
Turboelectric propulsion is a technology that can potentially reduce aircraft noise, increase fuel efficiency, and decrease harmful emissions. In a turbo-electric system, the propulsor (fans) is no longer connected to the turbine through a mechanical connection. Instead, a superconducting generator connected to a gas turbine produces electrical power which is delivered to distributed fans. This configuration can potentially decrease fuel burn by 10% [1]. One of the primary challenges in implementing turboelectric electric propulsion is designing the power distribution system to transmit power from the generator to the fans. The power distribution system is required to transmit 40 MW of power from the generator to the electrical loads on the aircraft. A conventional aircraft distribution cannot efficiently or reliably transmit this large amount of power; therefore, new power distribution technologies must be considered. Two critical components in the power distribution system that must be redesigned are the cables and power converters.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Bert Bras, Tina Guldberg
In this paper, we quantify several environmental benefits associated with using ultra fine scrap tire rubber powders in virgin and recycled rubber and plastics compounds. Specifically, we will analyze the savings in oil extraction and rubber production in comparison to the rubber powder production using cryogenic grinding. The analysis uses first hand factory data provided by a rubber powder producer. As will be shown, even though cryogenic nitrogen requires production and use of liquid nitrogen, there is still a net environmental benefit in terms of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
John Arata, Michael Leamy, Kenneth Cunefare
Power-split hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) employ two power paths between the internal combustion (IC) engine and the driven wheels routed through gearing and electric machines (EMs) composing an electrically variable transmission (EVT). The EVT allows IC engine control such that rotational speed can be independent of vehicle speed at all times. By breaking the rigid mechanical connection between the IC engine and the driven wheels, the EVT allows the IC engine to operate in the most efficient region of its characteristic brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) map. If the most efficient IC engine operating point produces more power than is requested by the driver, the excess IC engine power can be stored in the energy storage system (ESS) and used later. Conversely, if the most efficient IC engine operating point does not meet the power request of the driver, the ESS delivers the difference to the wheels through the EMs. Therefore with an intelligent supervisory control strategy, power-split architectures can advantageously combine traditional series and parallel power paths.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Bert Bras, Francisco Tejada, Jeff Yen, John Zullo, Tina Guldberg
Numerous studies have pointed out the growing need to assess the availability of water sources in numerous regions around the world as future forecasts suggest that water demands will increase significantly while freshwater resources are being depleted. In this paper, we highlight the difference between water use versus consumption and analyze the life-cycle water consumption of a car from material extraction through production, use, and final disposition/end of life and determine a car's water footprint using data from the EcoInvent database as well as data collected from literature sources. Although water use is typically metered at the factory level, water consumption (i.e., water lost through evaporation and/or incorporation into a material, part, and/or product) is much harder to quantify. As shown in this paper, the difference can be an order of magnitude or more. The use phase has significant impact on the overall vehicle water consumption, followed by material production, whereas end of life processing seems to be relatively insignificant.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Tetsuya Aizawa, Hiroki Nishigai, Katsufumi Kondo, Teruo Yamaguchi, Jean-Guillaume Nerva, Caroline Genzale, Sanghoon Kook, Lyle Pickett
For a better understanding of soot formation and oxidation processes in conventional diesel and biodiesel spray flames, the morphology, microstructure and sizes of soot particles directly sampled in spray flames fuelled with US#2 diesel and soy-methyl ester were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The soot samples were taken at 50mm from the injector nozzle, which corresponds to the peak soot location in the spray flames. The spray flames were generated in a constant-volume combustion chamber under a diesel-like high pressure and high temperature condition (6.7MPa, 1000K). Direct sampling permits a more direct assessment of soot as it is formed and oxidized in the flame, as opposed to exhaust PM measurements. Density of sampled soot particles, diameter of primary particles, size (gyration radius) and compactness (fractal dimension) of soot aggregates were analyzed and compared. No analysis of the soot micro-structure was made. The overall morphology of the biodiesel soot bears similarity to that of #2 diesel, but the soot density, primary particle size, and fractal dimension are smaller for biodiesel.
Technical Paper
2011-09-13
Qingmin Huang, Jin Huang, Aiguo Cheng
Suspension system dynamics can be obtained by various methods and vehicle design has gained great advantages over the dynamics analysis. By employing the new Udwadia-Kalaba equation, we endeavor some attempts on its application to dynamic modeling of vehicle suspension systems. The modeling approach first segments the suspension system into several component subsystems with kinematic constraints at the segment points released. The equations of motion of the unconstrained subsystems are thus easily obtained. Then by applying the second order constraints, the suspension system dynamics is then obtained. The equations are of closed-form. Having the equations obtained, we then show its application on dynamical load analysis. The solutions for the dynamical loads at interested hard points are obtained. We use the double wishbone suspension to show the systematic approach is easy handling.
Technical Paper
2011-08-30
Jean-Guillaume Nerva, Teruo Yamaguchi, Hiroki Iguma, Hiroki Nishigai, Katsufumi Kondo, Satoshi Takano, Tetsuya Aizawa, Caroline L. Genzale, Lyle M. Pickett
For better understanding of soot formation and oxidation processes in a biodiesel spray flame, the morphology, microstructure and sizes of soot particles directly sampled in a spray flame fuelled with soy-methyl ester were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The soot samples were taken at different axial locations in the spray flame, 40, 50 and 70 mm from injector nozzle, which correspond to soot formation, peak, and oxidation zones, respectively. The biodiesel spray flame was generated in a constant-volume combustion chamber under a diesel-like high pressure and temperature condition (6.7 MPa, 1000K). Density, diameter of primary particles and radius of gyration of soot aggregates reached a peak at 50 mm from the injector nozzle and was lower or smaller in the formation or oxidation zones of the spray.
Technical Paper
2011-06-13
Jeremy Bain, Lakshmi N. Sankar, Roger J. Aubert, Robert J. Flemming
An integrated approach for modeling the ice accretion and shedding of ice on helicopter rotors is presented. A modular framework is used that includes state of the art computational fluid dynamics, computational structural dynamics, rotor trim, ice accretion, and shedding tools. Results are presented for performance degradation due to icing, collection efficiency, surface temperature and water film properties associated with runback-refreeze phenomena, and shedding. Comparisons with other published simulations and test data are given.
Technical Paper
2011-05-17
Nicholas Earnhart, Kenneth Marek, Kenneth Cunefare
Hydraulic systems pose a particular problem for noise control. Due to the high speed of sound in hydraulic fluids, components typically designed to reduce fluid-borne noise can easily exceed practical size constraints. This paper presents novel solutions to creating compact and effective noise control devices for fluid power systems. A hydraulic silencer is presented that utilizes a voided polymer lining in lieu of a pressurized bladder. Theoretical modeling is developed which predicts device performance and can assist in future design work. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the device. Both voided and non-voided liners are tested to show the effect of the voiding on the performance. In addition, theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented for a prototype Helmholtz resonator that is two orders of magnitude smaller than previously developed devices.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Caroline L. Genzale, Lyle M. Pickett, Alexandra A. Hoops, Jeffrey M. Headrick
Laser plasma ignition has been pursued by engine researchers as an alternative to electric spark-ignition systems, potentially offering benefits by avoiding quenching surfaces and extending breakdown limits at higher boost pressure and lower equivalence ratio. For this study, we demonstrate another potential benefit: the ability to control the timing of ignition with short, nanosecond pulses, thereby optimizing the type of mixture that burns in rapidly changing, stratified fuel-air mixtures. We study laser ignition at various timings during single and double injections at simulated gasoline engine conditions within a controlled, high-temperature, high-pressure vessel. Laser ignition is accomplished with a single low-energy (10 mJ), short duration (8 ns) Nd:YAG laser beam that is tightly focused (0.015 mm average measured 1/e₂ diameter) at a typical GDI spark plug location. Ignition timing is varied during, after, and between injections of a rapid, 0.4-ms/0.35-ms dwell/0.4-ms injection schedule.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Lyle M. Pickett, Julien Manin, Caroline L. Genzale, Dennis L. Siebers, Mark P. B. Musculus, Cherian A. Idicheria
The fuel-ambient mixture in vaporized fuel jets produced by liquid sprays is fundamental to the performance and operation of engines. Unfortunately, experimental difficulties limit the direct measurement of local fuel-ambient mixture, inhibiting quantitative assessment of mixing. On the other hand, measurement of global quantities, such as the jet penetration rate, is relatively straightforward. Simplified models to predict local fuel-ambient mixture have also been developed, based on these global parameters. However, experimental data to validate these models over a range of conditions is needed. In the current work, we perform measurements of jet global quantities such as vapor-phase penetration, liquid-phase penetration, spreading angle, and nozzle flow coefficients over a range of conditions in a high-temperature, high-pressure vessel. Using this data and other quantitative mixing measurements performed by Rayleigh scattering in the vaporized portion of the jet, we compare to an existing variable-radial-profile model for prediction of fuel mixture fraction during the steady period of injection.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Jeff Yen, John Zullo, Francisco Tejada, Bert Bras, Tina Guldberg
The recent development of electric vehicles creates a new area of interest regarding their potential impacts on natural resource and energy networks. Water consumption is of particular interest, as water scarcity becomes a growing problem in many regions of the world. Water usage can be traced to the production of gasoline, as well as electricity, for regular operation of these vehicles. This paper focuses on the development of a framework to analyze the amount of water consumed in the operation of both conventional and electric vehicles. Using the Systems Modeling Language, a model was developed based on the water consumed directly in energy generation and processing as well as water consumed in obtaining and processing a vehicle's fuels. This model and framework will use the above water consumption breakdown to examine conventional and electric vehicles in metropolitan Atlanta to assess their impacts on that and other urban networks. Initial results show that electric vehicles can potentially consume significantly more water during normal driving usage than that of their gasoline engine counterparts, although such water consumption for either vehicle can vary widely across differing urban mobility networks due to differing dependencies on fossil or renewable fuels, differences in where electricity is sourced, as well as in regional transportation characteristics.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
John Arata, Michael J. Leamy, Jerome Meisel, Kenneth Cunefare, David Taylor
This paper presents a comparative analysis of two different power-split hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) powertrains using backward-looking simulations. Compared are the front-wheel drive (FWD) Toyota Hybrid System II (THS-II) and the FWD General Motors Allison Hybrid System II (GM AHS-II). The Toyota system employs a one-mode electrically variable transmission (EVT), while the GM system employs a two-mode EVT. Both powertrains are modeled with the same assumed mid-size sedan chassis parameters. Each design employs their native internal combustion (IC) engine because the transmission's characteristic ratios are designed for the respective brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) maps. Due to the similarities (e.g., power, torque, displacement, and thermal efficiency) between the two IC engines, their fuel consumption and performance differences are neglected in this comparison. The road-load parameters defining each system are used to calculate the required mechanical power at the driven wheels necessary to follow a given drive-cycle.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Jerome Meisel
General Motors has recently developed a front-wheel drive version of its two planetary two-mode transmission (2-MT) for a hybrid-electric vehicle powertrain [1]. This newer transmission includes two planetary gears with two transfer clutches and two braking clutches. With activation of designated pairs of these four clutches, four fixed-gear ratios between the transmission's input shaft and output shaft are obtained. In addition, activation of specific individual clutches gives two modes of operation whereby the IC engine speed is decoupled from the vehicle velocity thus providing an electrical continuously variable transmission (ECVT). This present paper extends the power-split analysis in [2] by deriving a safe-operating region (SOR) in the plane of IC engine speed vs. vehicle velocity for the four fixed-gear and two ECVT modes. This SOR is bounded by the speed limitations of the 2-MT components. Similar results are presented for the Toyota Hybrid System II (THS-II) transmission. Also developed is the vehicle velocity limit for both the 2-MT and the THS-II transmissions under battery electric vehicle (BEV) operation.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Bert Bras, Austin Cobert
Recently Michelin has been developing a new airless, integrated tire and wheel combination called the Tweel® tire. The Tweel tire aims at performance levels beyond those possible with conventional pneumatic technology because of its shear band design, added suspension, and potentially decreased rolling resistance. In this paper, we will focus on the environmental impact of the Tweel tire during its life-cycle from manufacturing, through use and disposal. Since the Tweel tire is currently still in the research phase and is not manufactured and used on a large scale, there are uncertainties with respect to end-of-life scenarios and rolling resistance estimates that will affect the LCA. Nevertheless, some preliminary conclusions of the Tweel tire's environmental performance in comparison to a conventional radial tire can be drawn.
Article
2010-11-18
The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) awarded Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne a $1.35 million contract to develop improved computational tools to better predict combustion stability of hydrocarbon-fueled liquid rocket engines.
Technical Paper
2010-11-02
Adam C. Maser, Elena Garcia, Dimitri N. Mavris
An integrated, multidisciplinary environment of a tactical aircraft platform has been created by leveraging the powerful capabilities of both MATLAB/Simulink and Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). The overall simulation includes propulsion, power, and thermal management subsystem models, which are integrated together and linked to an air vehicle model and mission profile. The model has the capability of tracking temperatures and performance metrics and subsequently controlling characteristics of the propulsion and thermal management subsystems. The integrated model enables system-level trade studies involving the optimization of engine bleed and power extraction and thermal management requirements to be conducted. The simulation can also be used to examine future technologies and advanced thermal management architectures in order to increase mission capability and performance.
Article
2010-08-20
The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has awarded Aurora Flight Sciences and its partner the Georgia Institute of Technology a contract to continue research and development of next-generation distributed controllers for turbine engines.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Yuriy Romaniw, Bert Bras, Tina Guldberg
This paper looks at a method for decomposing a manufactured product into what is called an “activity space.” The method uses an activity based costing scheme to structure the model and organize the information. It is discussed how the activity space is used to perform sustainability assessments of a manufactured product and the manufacturing process from different viewpoints and perspectives. The way in which the activity space is used to perform an assessment from several viewpoints is discussed.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Ryder Winck, Kenneth Marek, ChengShu Ngoo
This paper presents a study of the effects of anti-lock brakes on a vehicle with cable-type brakes with respect to stopping distance and vehicle control. While ABS is common on motorcycles and some hydraulic braking systems for mopeds, little research has been done on the use of anti-locks for low-powered vehicles using non-hydraulic brakes. A bicycle with cable-type brakes has been retrofitted with an active ABS. Experiments were carried out to compare the braking distance when the ABS was activated and deactivated. The study found that ABS did not sacrifice braking distance while improving vehicle control.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Benjamin D. Lee, Christiaan J.J. Paredis
Although the design phase can account for a sizable amount of the resources consumed during the product realization process, the time and costs associated with the design process are often neglected when making design decisions. To investigate this issue, we define a process-centric decision model in which the design-phase consumption of resources, such as time and money, is explicitly modeled. While it is clear that the utility of a design is almost always directly impacted by the monetary costs of the design process, our decision model also accounts for the fact that the profit earned by a product depends strongly on its launch date. The decision model allows us thus to consider the trade-off between the time necessary for analysis and the improvement in product quality that results from the analysis. The decision model is sufficiently generic that almost any set of beliefs about the alternatives or analyses, as well as any utility-based preference structure can be modeled. To illustrate the usefulness of the model, it was solved quantitatively for two different design scenarios.
Technical Paper
2009-11-10
Yuriy Romaniw, Bert Bras, Tina Guldberg
This article begins by describing the need for a new method and tool for performing a sustainability assessment for manufacturing processes and systems. A brief literature survey is done to highlight the major existing methods and tools, their function, and their shortcomings. The article goes on to describe the general approach of the method before describing a computer aided tool that has been developed to implement the method. The article concludes with a walk through of a generic use case that describes where such a method would be useful and how such a tool would be implemented.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Jerome Meisel
General Motors has introduced a Two-Mode Transmission (2-MT) that provides significant improvements over the Toyota THS-II transmission. These improvements are achieved by employing additional planetaries with clutches and brakes to switch from a Mode-1 to Mode-2 as vehicle speed increases. In addition the 2-MT has four fixed-gear ratios that provide for a purely mechanical energy path from the IC engine to the driven wheels with the electric machines also able to provide additional driving torque. The purpose of this present paper is to extend the methodology in a previous paper [1] to include the 2-MT, thereby presenting an analytic foundation for its operation. The main contribution in this analysis is in the definition of dimensionless separation factors, defined in each mode that govern the power split between the parallel mechanical and electrical energy paths from the IC engine to the driven wheels. Also included are numerical examples comparing the operation of the 2-MT and the THS-II transmissions.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Roxanne A. Conigliaro, Aleksandr A. Kerzhner, Christiaan J. J. Paredis
Modeling and simulation are commonly used in all stages of the design process. This is particularly vital to the success of systems engineering projects where the system under consideration is complex and involves interactions between many interdisciplinary subsystems. In the refining stages of the design process (after concept selection), models and simulations can be used to refine and optimize a system with respect to the decision maker’s objectives. In this paper, a dynamic model of a hydraulic backhoe serves as a test-bed for a large-scale sensitivity analysis and subsequent optimization of the most significant design parameters. The model is optimized under uncertainty with respect to a multi-attribute utility function that includes fuel consumption, cost of the key components, and machine performance. Since such an optimization can be costly in terms of time and computational resources, the objective of this paper is to provide a useful, cost-effective methodology for this type of problem.
Article
2009-03-11
Georgia Tech Research Institute is leading a team of researchers from five universities and research organizations to investigate the feasibility of using a forward-looking interferometer to detect several invisible atmospheric hazards during takeoff, cruise, and landing.
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