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Technical Paper
2011-05-17
Gi-Woo Kim, Joseph Kucharski, Gregory Pietron, Diana Yanakiev, Yuji Fujii, Kon-Well Wang
This paper presents the characterization of the random noise in driveline output shaft torque measurements that is commonly induced by road disturbances. To investigate the interaction between the shaft torque and road side excitation, torque signals are measured using a magnetoelastic torque sensor, as well as a conventional strain gauge sensor, under various types of road surfaces and conditions such as unevenness. A generalized de-trending method for producing a stationary random signal is first conducted. Statistical methods, in particular the probability density function and transform technique, are utilized to provide an evident signature for identifying the road excitation effect on the vehicle output shaft torque. Analysis results show how the road surface can act as a disturbance input to the vehicle shaft torque.
Technical Paper
2008-06-23
Jason P. Moscetti, Bryan GilroySmith, Volker Sick
A summary of the design and development process for a Formula SAE engine is described. The focus is on three fundamental elements on which the entire engine package is based. The first is engine layout and displacement, second is the fuel type, and third is the air induction method. These decisions lead to a design around a 4-cylinder 600cc motorcycle engine, utilizing a turbocharger and ethanol E-85 fuel. Concerns and constraints involved with vehicle integration are also highlighted. The final design was then tested on an engine dynamometer, and finally in the 2007 M-Racing FSAE racecar.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Van-Xuan Tran, Jwo Pan, Tsung-Yu Pan
Abstract In this investigation, dissimilar 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 spot friction welds were first made under different processing conditions. The spot friction welds in lap-shear specimens were tested under quasi-static loading conditions. The optimal processing times to maximize the failure loads of the 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 welds under lap-shear loading conditions are identified. The maximum failure load of the 7075/5754 welds is about 40% larger than that of the 5754/7075 welds. Optical micrographs of both types of spot friction welds made at different processing times before and after failure are examined. The micrographs show different weld geometries and different failure modes of spot friction welds made at different processing times. The failure modes of the 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 spot friction welds appear to be quite complex and strongly depend on the geometry and the strength of the interfacial surface between the two deformed sheet materials.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Van-Xuan Tran, Jwo Pan, Tsung-Yu Pan
Fatigue behaviors of aluminum 5754-O spot friction welds made by a concave tool in lap-shear specimens are investigated based on experimental observations and a fatigue life estimation model. Optical micrographs of the welds before and after failure under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions are examined. The micrographs indicate that the failure modes of the 5754 spot friction welds under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions are quite different. The dominant kinked fatigue cracks for the final failures of the welds under cyclic loading conditions are identified. Based on the experimental observations of the paths of the dominant kinked fatigue cracks, a fatigue life estimation model based on the stress intensity factor solutions for finite kinked cracks is adopted to estimate the fatigue lives of the welds. The fatigue life estimations based on the fatigue life estimation model with parameters obtained from the experiments and a three-dimensional finite element analysis agree well with the experimental results.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Dong Wook Lee, Zheng-Dong Ma, Noboru Kikuchi
The greatest demand facing the automotive industry has been to provide safer vehicles with high fuel efficiency at minimum cost. Current automotive vehicle structures have one fundamental handicap: a short crumple zone for crash energy absorption. This leaves limited room for further safety improvement, especially for high-speed crashes. Breakthrough technologies are needed. One potential breakthrough is to use active devices instead of conventional passive devices. An innovative inflatable bumper concept [1], called the “I-bumper,” is being developed by the authors for crashworthiness and safety of military and commercial vehicles. The proposed I-bumper has several active structural components, including a morphing mechanism, a movable bumper, two explosive airbags, and a morphing lattice structure with a locking mechanism that provides desired rigidity and energy absorption capability during a vehicular crash. It has additional innovative means for crashworthiness, which is to use tubes filled with a granular material to absorb crash energy.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Dong Wook Lee, Zheng-Dong Ma, Noboru Kikuchi
In the I-bumper (inflatable bumper) concept [1], two explosive airbags are released just before the main body-to-body crash in order to absorb the kinetic energy of colliding vehicles. The release also actuates other components in the I-bumper, including a movable bumper and an energy absorption morphing lattice structure. A small explosive charge will be used to deploy the airbag. A conventional airbag model will be used to reduce the crash energy in a controlled manner and reduce the peak impact force. An analytic model of the explosive airbag is developed in this paper for the I-bumper system and for its optimal design, while the complete system design (I-bumper) will be discussed in a separate paper. Analytical formulations for an explosive airbag will be developed and major design variables will be identified. These are used to determine the required amount of explosive and predict airbag behavior, as well to predict their impact on the I-bumper system. Related design guidelines and procedures will also be introduced.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
P.-C. Lin, J. Pan
Closed-form stress intensity factor solutions at the critical locations of spot welds in four types of commonly used specimens are obtained based on elasticity theories and fracture mechanics. The loading conditions for spot welds in the central parts of four types of specimens are first examined. The resultant loads on the weld nugget and the self-balanced resultant loads on the lateral surface of the central parts of the specimens are then decomposed into various types of symmetric and anti-symmetric parts. Closed-form structural stress and stress intensity factor solutions for spot welds under various types of loading conditions are then adopted from a recent work of Lin and Pan to derive new closed-form stress intensity factor solutions at the critical locations of spot welds in the four types of specimens.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Michael K. Chin, James D. Smith, Volker Sick
A potential correlation between OH* chemiluminescence and exhaust NO concentration is investigated to pursue a simple diagnostic technique for measurements of NO cycle-to-cycle fluctuations. Previous investigations of NO formation in a direct-injection gasoline engine have indicated that there may be a correlation between the concentration of NO and OH* chemiluminescence. Shortcomings of this work, namely phase-locked measurements, were overcome in the present study by using highspeed imaging capability to obtain chemiluminescence within the entire engine cycle and from entire engine cylinder volume. Cycle-resolved NO exhaust gas detection were performed synchronously with the chemiluminescence measurements on an optical spark-ignited engine with spray-guided direct-injection. A quartz cylinder liner, head and piston windows provide optical access for a highspeed CMOS camera and image intensifier to capture OH* images. Much of the combustion occurs within the piston bowl, requiring side windows for a complete visualization of the combustion process.
Technical Paper
2007-10-29
James D. Smith, Volker Sick
Near-term energy policy for ground transportation is likely to have a strong focus on both gains in efficiency as well as the use of alternate fuels; as both can reduce crude oil dependence and carbon loading on the environment. Stratified-charge spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engines are capable of achieving significant gains in efficiency. In addition, these engines are likely to be run on alternative fuels. Specifically, lower alcohols such as ethanol and iso-butanol, which can be produced from renewable sources. SIDI engines, particularly the spray-guided variant, tend to be very sensitive to mixture preparation since fuel injection and ignition occur within a short time of each other. This close spacing is necessary to form a flammable mixture near the spark plug while maintaining an overall lean state in the combustion chamber. As a result, the physical properties of the fuel have a large effect on this process. Since alcohols tend to have higher heats of vaporization & lower energy densities compared to gasoline (which requires a greater fuel mass to be injected), the local conditions at the time of ignition can be very different from more conventional fuels.
Technical Paper
2007-05-15
Keychun Park, Matthew P. Castanier
When performing vibration analysis of complex vehicle structures, it is often important to be able to evaluate the effects of design changes in one or more substructures (e.g., for design optimization). It may also be convenient to allow different components to be modeled independently by different groups or organizations. For both cases, it is inevitable that some substructures will have non-matching finite element meshes at the interface where they are physically connected. Thus, a key challenge is to be able to handle the dynamic assembly of components with non-matching meshes and the subsequent global vibration analysis in a systematic and efficient manner. To tackle this problem, the enhancement of component mode synthesis methods for handling finite element models partitioned into non-matching substructures is considered in this paper. Some existing methods are reviewed, and new methods are developed. Three main approaches are considered: interface interpolation, interface reduction, and component synthesis.
Technical Paper
2007-05-15
Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Sheng Li, Michel Viktorovitch, Davide Caprioli
The hybrid Finite Element Analysis (hybrid FEA) has been developed for performing structure-borne computations in automotive vehicle structures [1, 2 and 3]. The hybrid FEA method combines conventional FEA with Energy FEA (EFEA). Conventional FEA models are employed for modeling the behavior of the stiff members in a system. Appropriate damping and spring or mass elements are introduced in the connections between stiff and flexible members in order to capture the presence of the flexible members during the analyses of the stiff ones. The component mode synthesis method is combined with analytical solutions for determining the driving point conductance at joints between stiff and flexible members and for defining the properties of the concentrated elements which represent the flexible members when analyzing the stiff components. Once the vibration of the stiff members and the amount of power dissipated at the damping elements has been identified, an EFEA analysis is performed in order to determine the amount of vibrational energy in the flexible members.
Technical Paper
2007-04-16
K. Sripichai, P.-C. Lin, J. Pan
A fatigue crack growth model is adopted in this paper to investigate the fatigue lives of resistance spot welds in square-cup and lap-shear specimens of dual phase, low carbon and high strength steels under cyclic loading conditions. The fatigue crack growth model is based on the global stress intensity factor solutions for main cracks, the local stress intensity factor solutions for kinked cracks as functions of the kink length, the experimentally determined kink angles, and the Paris law for kinked crack propagation. The predicted fatigue lives based on the fatigue crack growth model are then compared with the experimental data. The results indicate that the fatigue life predictions based on the fatigue crack growth model are in agreement with or lower than the experimental results.
Technical Paper
2007-04-16
Alexander Knafl, Manbae Han, Stanislav V. Bohac, Dennis N. Assanis, Patrick G. Szymkowicz
This paper analyzes and compares reactor and engine behavior of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) in the presence of conventional diesel exhaust and low temperature premixed compression ignition (PCI) diesel exhaust. Surrogate exhaust mixtures of n-undecane (C11H24), ethene (C2H4), CO, O2, H2O, NO and N2 are defined for conventional and PCI combustion and used in the gas flow reactor tests. Both engine and reactor tests use a DOC containing platinum, palladium and a hydrocarbon storage component (zeolite). On both the engine and reactor, the composition of PCI exhaust increases light-off temperature relative to conventional combustion. However, while nominal conditions are similar, the catalyst behaves differently on the two experimental setups. The engine DOC shows higher initial apparent HC conversion efficiencies because the engine exhaust contains a higher fraction of trappable (i.e., high boiling point) HC. Engine DOC light-off is delayed because in the tests performed, engine-out CO was 11-30% higher than on the reactor, causing significant self-inhibition.
Technical Paper
2007-04-16
S. P. Gladyshev, V. M. Bunov, V. S. Morozova, E. V. Bunova, V. S. Goon
The feature of offered algorithm is that it allows, without record and analysis of the display diagram, to estimate a running cycle of a diesel engine parameters which characterize ecological and economic performances. The mathematical model described in report allows to determine connection of coefficient of filling, pressure and temperature of air boost, factor of excess of air with effectiveness ratio of combustion and contents of soot in exhaust gas and to take into account this connection at a choice initial data for control fuel feed or for elaboration of diesel engine dynamic model. The algorithm incorporated, for example, in the microcontroller of an electronic fuel feed controller allows analyzing the sensors data and theoretically determine of smoke amount in the exhaust gases for chosen cycle of fuel feed. The restriction of smoke is possible by criterion dD/dGT, where D - contents of soot in exhaust gas and GT - fuel cycle submission under the program-adaptive schema. In example, the calculated values of the soot content in exhaust gases are compared with the experimental data for various models of diesel engines.
Technical Paper
2006-10-16
James D. Smith, Volker Sick
The spark process has previously been shown to heavily influence ignition stability, particularly in direct-injected gasoline engines. Despite this influence, few studies have addressed spark behavior in direct-injected engines. This study examines the role of environmental factors on the behavior of the spark. Through measurement of the spark duration, by way of the ignition current trace, several observations are made on the influence of external factors on the behavior of the spark. Changing the level of nitrogen in the cylinder (to simulate EGR), the level of wetting and velocity imparted by the spray, the ignition dwell time and the orientation of the ground strap, observations are made as to which conditions are likely to produce unfavorable (shorter) spark durations. Through collection of a statistically significant number of sample spark lengths under each condition, histograms have been assembled and compared under each case. In addition, visual observations from high-speed laser-based imaging provide insight into why certain conditions are better or worse than others in providing a more robust spark.
Technical Paper
2006-07-04
K. Han Kim, Bernard J. Martin, R. Brent Gillespie
The relationship between motion and posture was investigated from the kinematics of unconstrained head movements. Head movements for visual gazing exhibited an initial component whose amplitude does not exceed 20.3° for target eccentricity up to 120°. This component was truncated by subsequent corrective movements whose occurrence generally increases with target eccentricity, although with a large variability (R2 ≤ 0.46). The head is finally stabilized at 72% of target eccentricity (R2 ≥ 0.92). These results indicate that the final head posture can be achieved through a number of loosely-programmed kinematic variations. Based on these results, unconstrained head movements were simulated, within the context of application to posture prediction for estimation of the visual field.
Technical Paper
2006-07-04
Kevin A. Rider, Don B. Chaffin, Bernard J. Martin
Vehicle ride motion produces a dynamic response of the seated operator, which disturbs the intended fingertip trajectory during reach activities. This perturbation induces deviations that must be corrected to successfully complete the reach. Visual and/or proprioceptive information are necessary to detect these deviations and provide feedback to the controller of the neuromuscular system. In an attempt to predict movement alterations and adjustments under whole body vibration exposure, a trajectory planning and feedback controller was developed using split sample data from a series of reaching experiments on a six degree of freedom motion platform.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
James D. Smith, Volker Sick
Ignition stability was studied in an optical spray guided spark ignition direct injection engine. The impact of intake air dilution with nitrogen, spark plug orientation, ignition system dwell time, and fuel injector targeting was addressed. Crank angle resolved fuel distributions were measured with a high-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence technique for hundreds of consecutive cycles. IMEP, COV of IMEP, burn rates and spark energy delivered to the gas were examined and used in conjunction with the imaging data to identify potential reasons for misfires.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
P.-C. Lin, J. Pan, T. Pan
Fatigue failures of spot friction welds in lap-shear specimens of aluminum 6111-T4 sheets under cyclic loading conditions are investigated in this paper. The paths of fatigue cracks near the spot friction welds are first discussed. A fatigue crack growth model based on the Paris law for crack propagation and the global and local stress intensity factors for kinked cracks is then adopted to predict the fatigue lives of these spot friction welds. The global stress intensity factors and the local stress intensity factors based on the recent published works for resistance spot welds in lap-shear specimens are used to estimate the local stress intensity factors for kinked cracks with experimentally determined kink angles. The results indicate that the fatigue life predictions based on the Paris law and the local stress intensity factors as functions of the kink length agree well with the experimental results.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
Sang Bum Hong, Nickolas Vlahopoulos
A new development in the area of the hybrid Finite Element Analysis (hybrid FEA) is presented. The hybrid FEA method combines the conventional FEA method with energy FEA (EFEA) for analysis of systems that contain both flexible and stiff members, and is suitable for mid-frequency computations. A formulation for analyzing flexible plates spot-welded to stiff beams when the excitation is applied on the stiff members is developed. Conventional FEA models are employed for modeling the behavior of the stiff members in a system. Appropriate damping elements are introduced in the connections between stiff and flexible members in order to capture the presence of the flexible members during the analyses of the stiff ones. The component mode synthesis method is combined with analytical solutions for determining the driving point conductance at joints between stiff and flexible members and for defining the properties of the damping elements which represent the flexible members when analyzing the stiff components.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
Bin Wu, Robert G. Prucka, Zoran S. Filipi, Denise M. Kramer, Gregory L. Ohl
Cam-phasing is increasingly considered as a feasible Variable Valve Timing (VVT) technology for production engines. Additional independent control variables in a dual-independent VVT engine increase the complexity of the system, and achieving its full benefit depends critically on devising an optimum control strategy. A traditional approach relying on hardware experiments to generate set-point maps for all independent control variables leads to an exponential increase in the number of required tests and prohibitive cost. Instead, this work formulates the task of defining actuator set-points as an optimization problem. In our previous study, an optimization framework was developed and demonstrated with the objective of maximizing torque at full load. This study extends the technique and uses the optimization framework to minimize fuel consumption of a VVT engine at part load. By adding a penalty term for NOx emissions in the optimization objective, the tradeoff of fuel consumption and NOx emissions is explored.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
Suzanne G. Hoffman, Don B. Chaffin, David W. Wagner
Posture selection during standing exertions is a complex process involving tradeoffs between muscle strength and balance. Bodyweight utilization reduces the amount of upper-body strength required to perform a high force push/pull exertion but shifts the center-of-gravity towards the limits of the functional stability region. Thus balance constraints limit the extent to which bodyweight can be used to generate push/pull forces. This paper examines a two-handed sagittal plane pulling exertion performed during a battery maintenance task on a member of the family of medium-sized tactical vehicles (FMTV). Percent capable strength predictions and functional balance capabilities were determined for various two-handed pulling postures using the University of Michigan's 3D Static Strength Prediction Program (3DSSPP). Through this simulation study, preferred postures that minimize joint torques while maintaining balance were identified. Such preferred postures are important in redesigning the vehicle for improved maintenance.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
Dohoy Jung, Dennis N. Assanis
Compact heat exchangers have been widely used in various applications in thermal fluid systems including automotive thermal management systems. Radiators for engine cooling systems, evaporators and condensers for HVAC systems, oil coolers, and intercoolers are typical examples of the compact heat exchangers that can be found in ground vehicles. Among the different types of heat exchangers for engine cooling applications, cross flow compact heat exchangers with louvered fins are of special interest because of their higher heat rejection capability with the lower flow resistance. In this study, a predictive numerical model for the cross flow type heat exchanger with louvered fins has been developed based on the thermal resistance concept and the finite difference method in order to provide a design and development tool for the heat exchanger. The model was validated with the experimental data from an engine cooling radiator. As a case study, the effect of the geometric changes of the heat exchanger on the heat rejection performance was explored.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
Michael J. Flannagan, Michael Sivak
The effects of image size on perceived distance have been of concern for convex rearview mirrors as well as camera-based rear vision systems. We suggest that the importance of image size is limited to cases-such as current rearview mirrors-in which the field of view is small. With larger, richer fields of view it is likely that other distance cues will dominate image size, thereby substantially diminishing the concern that distortions of size will result in distortions of distance perception. We report results from an experiment performed in a driving simulator, with static simulated rearward images, in which subjects were asked to make judgments about the distance to a rearward vehicle. The images showed a field of view substantially wider than provided by any of the individual rearview mirrors in current systems. The field of view was 38 degrees wide and was presented on displays that were either 16.7 or 8.5 degrees wide, thus minifying images by factors of 0.44 or 0.22. In contrast to previous studies of convex mirrors and camera-based rear vision systems, judgments about distance were not affected by image size, suggesting that distance cues other than size were available to subjects as they made their judgments.
Technical Paper
2005-10-24
Bin Wu, Robert G. Prucka, Zoran S. Filipi, Denise M. Kramer, Gregory L. Ohl
Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) technology provides high potential in achieving high performance, low fuel consumption and pollutant reduction. However, more degrees of freedom impose a big challenge for engine characterization and calibration. In this study, a simulation based approach and optimization framework is proposed to optimize the setpoints of multiple independent control variables. Since solving an optimization problem typically requires hundreds of function evaluations, a direct use of the high-fidelity simulation tool leads to the unbearably long computational time. Hence, the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are trained with high-fidelity simulation results and used as surrogate models, representing engine's response to different control variable combinations with greatly reduced computational time. To demonstrate the proposed methodology, the cam-phasing strategy at Wide Open Throttle (WOT) is optimized for a dual-independent Variable Valve Timing (VVT) engine. The optimality of the cam-phasing strategy is validated with engine dynamometer tests.
Technical Paper
2005-10-24
James D. Smith, Volker Sick
A combination of imaging techniques for investigations of highly transient processes and cyclic variations in internal combustion engines is presented. The single high-speed camera setup uses a CMOS camera combined with a two-stage image-intensifier and two excimer lasers. Fuel mixing, ignition and combustion were monitored via planar laser induced fluorescence imaging of toluene as a tracer that was added to iso-octane in combination with the simultaneous recording of light emission from the spark plasma and OH* chemiluminescence of the developing flame. Image frame rates of 12 kHz for hundreds of cycles were achieved. Application to misfire events in a spray-guided gasoline direct-injection engine is described to illustrate the merits of the technique.
Technical Paper
2005-05-16
Jiulong Sun, Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Kevin Hu
Numerical models are used for computing the shock response in many areas of engineering applications. Current analysis methods do not account for uncertainties in the model parameters. In addition, when numerical models are calibrated based on test data neither the uncertainty which is present in the test data nor the uncertainty in the model are taken into account. In this paper an approach for model update under uncertainty and error estimation for shock applications is presented. Fast running models are developed for the model update based on principal component analysis and surrogate models. Once the numerical model has been updated the fast running models are employed for performing probabilistic analyses and estimate the error in the numerical solution. The new developments are applied for computing the shock response of large scale structures, updating the numerical model based on test data, and estimating the error in the predictions. The initial application of this new capability is in the area of ship response to an underwater explosion.
Technical Paper
2005-05-16
Sang Bum Hong, Nickolas Vlahopoulos
A hybrid finite element formulation for analyzing flexible plates connected to stiff frame was developed. The excitation was considered to be applied on the stiff members. Conventional FEA models were employed for modeling the behavior of the stiff members in a system. Appropriate damping elements were introduced in the connections between stiff and flexible members in order to capture the presence of the flexible members during the analyses of the stiff ones. Once the vibration of the stiff members and the amount of power dissipated at the damping elements was identified, an EFEA analysis was performed in order to determine the amount of vibrational energy in the flexible members. The hybrid FEA is applied to a Body-In-White (BIW). The results of the hybrid FEA are compared with results from very dense conventional finite element analyses. The correlation demonstrates that the hybrid FEA can be employed for structure-borne vibration and noise analysis during the design stage of a vehicle, and that it offers a coupling between traditional energy based methods and conventional FEA tools used in vehicle design.
Technical Paper
2005-05-16
Sang Bum Hong, Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Robert Mantey, David Gorsich
ADRPM (Acoustic Detection Range Prediction Model) is a software program that models the propagation of acoustic energy through the atmosphere and evaluates detectable distance. ADRPM predicts the distance of detection for a noise source based on the acoustic signature of the source. The acoustic signature of a vehicle is computed by combining BEA and EBEA computations with nearfield measurements. The computed signature is utilized as the input to ADRPM. Once the initial detection range is predicted the main contributors to the acoustic detection are identified by ADRPM and their location on the vehicle is modified in order to assess the corresponding effect to the detectable distance of the vehicle.
Technical Paper
2005-05-11
Nicole Wermuth, Volker Sick
Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of fuel/air mixing in engines are usually based on the use of fluorescence tracers. The strength of the signals often depends on temperature, pressure and mixture composition. This complicates a quantitative analysis. The use of a small-bore optical engine for fundamental studies of absorption and fluorescence properties of fluorescence tracers is described. The temperature, pressure and composition dependence of the spectra of toluene, acetone, 3-pentanone, and biacetyl are examined under motored conditions to extend the experimental data base for the development of comprehensive models that predict the strength of fluorescence signals for a given condition.
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