Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 419
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1161
Akira Mori
Abstract In 2007, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology successfully completed a Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) experiment. Ever since, interest in WPT has been growing. At Toyota, we have been developing the underlying technology of a WPT system. Simultaneously we have been working with regulatory committees to create a standard for WPT. In particular, there are concerns that WPT’s radiated emissions could cause harm to humans and the neighboring electronic equipment. There are many challenges that need to be overcome, but a key concern is understanding WPT’s electromagnetic compatibility (EMI: Electro-Magnetic Interference and EMF: Electro-Magnetic Field). In this paper, we show the technical issues, the evaluation method, and the development status of EMI and EMF on PHVs/EVs when using WPT. For Electromagnetic interference (EMI) performance, we investigated both an open area test site and an electromagnetic anechoic chamber as evaluation environments.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1155
Toru Nakamura, Takahiro Misawa, Yusuke Futakuchi, Kensuke Kamichi
Abstract Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) began a wireless charging field test in February 2014. A wireless charging system was installed at the residences of test subjects with the aim of identifying issues related to convenience and installation in daily usage. The test vehicle was fabricated by installing a wireless charging system into a Prius PHV (Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle). The installed system had the same charging power as the cable charging system used on the base vehicle, and had a charging time of 1.5 hours. A high-frequency 85 kHz power supply and primary coil were produced for the charging infrastructure. To identify differences in charging behavior, the test subjects were asked to use the cable charging system for the first month before changing to the wireless charging system for two months. Data acquisition was performed by an on-board data logger and through interviews with the test subjects.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1181
Takao Watanabe, Tadashi Fujiyoshi, Akira Murakami
Abstract In the present paper, we introduce a drivetrain system using an electromagnetic coupling for hybrid electric vehicles, and propose a new control concept of vibration torque interception. The electromagnetic coupling is an electric machine that is composed of a pair of rotors, and electromagnetic torque acts mutually between the rotors. In the drivetrain system, the electromagnetic coupling works as a torque transmission device with a rotational-speed-converting function. We demonstrate that, by using this control, the electromagnetic coupling also works as a damping device that intercepts the vibration torque of the internal combustion engine, while transmitting the smooth torque to its drive line. Using a model of a two-inertia resonance system, a control system is designed such that a transfer function representing input-to-output torque is shaped in the frequency domain.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1093
Takao Ohki, Tomoyasu Wada, Tomoyuki Kano, Tomoyoshi Ishimaru, Hideya Osawa
Abstract In recent years, awareness of environmental problems has increased on a global scale, and the development of low fuel consumption technologies has become more and more important in commercial vehicles, as it has been in passenger vehicles. A new 6-speed manual transmission was developed with direct-drive double-overdrive to contribute to the fuel economy performance and engine power of commercial vehicles through gear ratio optimization.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1110
Toshinari Sano, Masashi Inoue, Fumihiro Itoigawa
Abstract This report proposes a method of improving the temperature prediction model for traction drive contact portion in order to improve prediction accuracy of the maximum traction coefficient, and then describes verification of this method. In our previous report, a method of estimating the maximum traction coefficient by expressing conditions inside the contact ellipse using a simple combination of viscosity and plasticity was proposed. For the rise in oil film temperature, a calculation model is used that considers maximum temperature to be the typical value. Furthermore, a thin film temperature sensor technology was developed to directly measure the temperature of traction contact of a four-roller experimental apparatus and a variator in an actual transmission, and its validity was confirmed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1135
Yoshitaka Shinoda, Atsushi Mori, Takeo Yamamoto, Takeshi Nakamura
Abstract Driveshafts are composed of a transmission side joint, wheel side joint, and shaft which connect the two joints. The Rzeppa type constant velocity joint (CVJ) is usually selected as the wheel side joint of a drive shaft for front wheel drive automobiles. Due to recent needs of fuel efficiency and lighter weight for vehicles, it is necessary to reduce the joint size and improve the efficiency of a CVJ. In order to reduce the weight, solving tribology details for long life under high contact pressure is an important issue for developing a CVJ. It is difficult to understand the characteristics of a contact surface, such as relative slip velocity or spin behavior, because the outer race, inner race, cage, and balls, act complicatedly and exchange loads at many points. Meanwhile, after joint endurance tests, ball spalling marks at pole of the ball are sometimes observed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1210
Koji Shiozaki, Ken Toshiyuki, Jae Seung Lee, Kyosuke Miyagi, Adam Barkley, Zach Cole, Brandon Passmore, Ty McNutt, Alexander B. Lostetter
Abstract This paper presents a new application of a vehicle on-board battery charger utilizing high frequency Silicon Carbide (SiC) power devices. SiC is one of the most promising alternatives to Silicon (Si) for power semiconductor devices due to its superior material characteristics such as lower on-state resistance, higher junction temperature, and higher switching frequency. An on-board charger prototype is developed demonstrating these advantages and a peak system efficiency of 95% is measured while operating with a switching frequency of 250 kHz. A maximum output power of 6.06 kW results in a gravimetric power density of 3.8 W/kg and a volumetric power density of 5.0 kW/L, which are about 10 times the densities compared with the current Prius Plug-In Si charger. SiC technology is indispensable to eco-friendly PHV/EV development.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1222
Shu Asami, Takao Watanabe, Satoshi Tominaga, Akira Murakami
Abstract This paper describes the slip ring system for a new hybrid system using an electromagnetic torque converter or an electromagnetic coupling. The slip ring system, which enables electric power transmission between a winding rotor and an inverter fixed on a case, is a key component for establishing a new highly efficient hybrid system. Reducing the wear of the brushes in the slip ring system is a major topic of this research. To achieve this objective, brush wear characteristics were investigated using test-piece experiments that simulated the hybrid system environment. By clarifying these characteristics, the structure of a slip ring system for reducing brush wear was identified and a wear prediction method was constructed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1521
Masaaki Kuwahara, Tsuyoshi Yasuki, Takeki Tanoue, Ryosuke Chikazawa
Abstract This paper describes impact kinematics and injury values of Hybrid III AM50, THOR AM50 and THUMS AM50 in simulated oblique frontal impact conditions. A comparison was made among them in driver and passenger seat positions of a midsize sedan car finite element (FE) model. The simulation results indicated that the impact kinematics of THOR was close to that of THUMS compared to that of the Hybrid III. Both THOR and THUMS showed z-axis rotation of the rib cage, while Hybrid III did not. It was considered that the rib cage rotation was due primarily to the oblique impact but was allowed by flexibility of the lumbar spine in THOR and THUMS. Lateral head displacement observed in both THOR and THUMS was mostly induced by that rotation in both driver seat and passenger seat positions. The BrIC, thorax and abdominal injury values were close to each other between THOR and THUMS, while HIC15 and Acetabulum force values were different.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1507
Jisi Tang, Qing Zhou, Bingbing Nie, Tsuyoshi Yasuki, Yuichi Kitagawa
Abstract Lower extremities are the most frequently injured body regions in vehicle-to-pedestrian collisions and such injuries usually lead to long-term loss of health or permanent disability. However, influence of pre-impact posture on the resultant impact response has not been understood well. This study aims to investigate the effects of preimpact pedestrian posture on the loading and the kinematics of the lower extremity when struck laterally by vehicle. THUMS pedestrian model was modified to consider both standing and mid-stance walking postures. Impact simulations were conducted under three severities, including 25, 33 and 40 kph impact for both postures. Global kinematics of pedestrian was studied. Rotation of the knee joint about the three axes was calculated and pelvic translational and rotational motions were analyzed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0973
Takafumi Yamauchi, Yoshiki Takatori, Koichiro Fukuda, Masatoshi Maruyama
Abstract Urea-SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) systems are getting a lot of attention as the most promising NOx reduction technology for heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust. In order to promote an effective development for an optimal urea-SCR after-treatment system, it is important to clarify the decomposition behavior of the injected urea and a detailed reaction chemistry of the reactants on the catalyst surface in exhaust gases. In this paper we discuss experimental and numerical studies for the development of a numerical simulation model for the urea-SCR catalyst converter. As a first step, in order to clarify the behavior of reductants in an urea-SCR converter, two types of diagnostic technique were developed; one is for measuring the amount of NH3, and the other is for measuring the amount of total reductants including unreacted urea and iso-cyanic acid. These techniques were applied to examine the behavior of reductants at the inlet and inside the SCR converter.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0960
Arifumi Matsumoto, Kenji Furui, Makoto Ogiso, Toru Kidokoro
Abstract Urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems are a promising technology for helping to lower NOx emissions from diesel engines. These systems also require on-board diagnostic (OBD) systems to detect malfunctioning catalysts. Conventional OBD methodology for a SCR catalyst involves the measurement of NOx concentration downstream of the catalyst. However, considering future OBD regulations, erroneous diagnostics may occur due to variations in the actual environment. Therefore, to enhance OBD accuracy, a new methodology was examined that utilizes NH3 slip as a new diagnostic parameter in addition to NOx. NH3 slip increases as the NOx reduction performance degrades, because both phenomena are based on deterioration in the capability of the SCR catalyst to adsorb NH3. Furthermore, NH3 can be measured by existing NOx sensors because NH3 is oxidized to NO internally. To make use of NH3 slip, an estimation model was developed.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1314
Ryoichi Hibino, Tomohiko Jimbo, Hiroyuki Yamaguchi, Yasuaki Tsurumi, Hideaki Otsubo, Shinji Kato
Abstract With the goal of improving drivability, this research aimed to clarify the mechanism of vehicle longitudinal acceleration, focusing on tip-in acceleration. Conventional typical analysis methods include experimental modal and model-based analysis. However, since the former requires the measurement of impulses and other input forces while the vehicle is stopped, measurement under actual driving conditions is difficult. The latter requires characteristic values such as the stiffness and damping coefficients to be identified in advance, which cannot be achieved either easily or precisely. Therefore, this paper proposes a new experiment-based analysis method. This method enables the acquisition of engine torque and transmission torque/force by measuring only the acceleration values of some components under driving conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1344
Koushi Kumagai, Masaaki Kuwahara, Tsuyoshi Yasuki, Norimasa Koreishi
Abstract This paper describes the development of a fracture finite element (FE) model for laser screw welding (LSW) and validation of the model with experimental results. LSW was developed and introduced to production vehicles by Toyota Motor Corporation in 2013. LSW offers superb advantages such as increased productivity and short pitch welding. Although the authors had previously developed fracture FE models for conventional resistance spot welding (RSW), a fracture model for LSW has not been developed. To develop this fracture model, many comprehensive experiments were conducted. The results revealed that LSW had twice as many variations in fracture modes compared to RSW. Moreover, fracture mode bifurcations were also found to result from differences in clearance between welded plates. In order to analyze LSW fracture phenomena, detailed FE models using fine hexahedral elements were developed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1355
Jeffrey R. Hodgkins, Walter Brophy, Thomas Gaydosh, Norimasa Kobayashi, Hiroo Yamaoka
Abstract Current vehicle acoustic performance prediction methods, CAE (computer aided engineering) or physical testing, have some difficulty predicting interior sound in the mid-frequency range (300 to 1000 Hz). It is in this frequency range where the overall acoustic performance becomes sensitive to not only the contributions of structure-borne sources, which can be studied using traditional finite element analysis (FEA) methods, but also the contribution of airborne noise sources which increase proportional to frequency. It is in this higher frequency range (>1000 Hz) that physical testing and statistical CAE methods are traditionally used for performance studies. This paper will discuss a study that was undertaken to test the capability of a finite element modeling method that can accurately simulate air-borne noise phenomena in the mid-frequency range.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1266
Shinichi Urabe, Kazutaka Kimura, Yuki Kudo, Akinori Sato
Abstract Solar and other green energy technologies are attracting attention as a means of helping to address global warming caused by CO2 and other emission gases. Countries, factories, and individual homes around the world have already introduced photovoltaic energy power sources, a trend that is likely to increase in the future. Electric vehicles powered from photovoltaic energy systems can help decrease the CO2 emmissions caused by vehicles. Unlike vehicles used for solar car racing, it is not easy to equip conventional vehicles with solar modules because the available area for module installation is very small to maintain cabin space, and the body lines of conventional vehicles are also usually slightly rounded. These factors decrease the performance of photovoltaic energy systems and prevent sufficient electric power generation. This research aimed to estimate the effectiveness of a solar module power generating system equipped on a conventional car, the Toyota Prius PHV.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1674
Takao Kobayashi, Etsuo Katsuyama, Hideki Sugiura, Eiichi Ono, Masaki Yamamoto
Abstract The research described in this paper aimed to study the cornering resistance and dissipation power on the tire contact patch, and to develop an efficient direct yaw moment control (DYC) during acceleration and deceleration while turning. A previously reported method [1], which formulates the cornering resistance in steady-state cornering, was extended to so-called quasi steady-state cornering that includes acceleration and deceleration while turning. Simulations revealed that the direct yaw moment reduces the dissipation power due to the load shift between the front and rear wheels. In addition, the optimum direct yaw moment cancels out the understeer augmented by acceleration. In contrast, anti-direct yaw moment optimizes the dissipation power during decelerating to maximize kinetic energy recovery. The optimization method proved that the optimum direct yaw moment can be achieved by equalizing the slip vectors of all the wheels.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1668
Hideki Fukudome
Abstract This study analyzed the longitudinal vibration of a vehicle body and unsprung mass. Calculations and tests verified that longitudinal vibration can be reduced using in-wheel motors, which generate torque very quickly. Despite increasing demand for measures to enhance ride comfort considering longitudinal vibration, this type of vibration cannot be absorbed or controlled using a conventional suspension. This paper describes the reduction of vehicle longitudinal vibration that cannot be controlled by conventional actuators.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1664
Yoshio Masuda, Yosuke Yamasoe, Yosuke Kuki, Takahiro Okano, Kiyoyuki Uchida
Abstract To solve various environmental problems, fuel-efficient vehicles that reduce CO2 emissions as well as exhaust gas emissions have been developed. In such vehicles, a regenerative brake is used to further reduce fuel consumption. Because the market size for such vehicles is expanding, a brake system is required that can be used in a wide range of vehicles extending from internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs) to electric vehicles (EVs). In addition, issues such as deceleration fluctuation and brake pedal fluctuation arise because the regenerative brake force is dependent on the vehicle speed. This paper presents a brake system configuration and its element technologies that can replace existing brake systems in different vehicles ranging from ICEVs to EVs. The proposed system can realize a regenerative cooperative brake not only by replacing the brake booster unit but also without replacing the modulator.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1660
Takahiro Okano, Akira Sakai, Yusuke Kamiya, Yoshio Masuda, Tomoyuki Yamaguchi
Abstract The use of hybrid, fuel cell electric, and pure electric vehicles is on the increase as part of measures to help reduce exhaust gas emissions and to help resolve energy issues. These vehicles use regenerative-friction brake coordination technology, which requires a braking system that can accurately control the hydraulic brakes in response to small changes in regenerative braking. At the same time, the spread of collision avoidance support technology is progressing at a rapid pace along with a growing awareness of vehicle safety. This technology requires braking systems that can apply a large braking force in a short time. Although brake systems that have both accurate hydraulic control and large braking force have been developed in the past, simplification is required to promote further adoption.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1677
Hiroshi Himeno, Etsuo Katsuyama, Takao Kobayashi
Abstract Electric vehicles (EVs) are attracting attention due to growing awareness of environmental issues such as fossil fuel depletion and global warming. In particular, a wide range of research has examined how direct yaw moment controls (DYCs) can enhance the handling performance of EVs equipped with multiple in-wheel motors (IWMs) or the like. Recently, this research has focused on reducing energy consumption through driving force distribution control. The first report proposed a method to minimize energy consumption through an efficient DYC for extending the cruising range of a vehicle installed with four IWMs, and described the vehicle behavior with this control. Since motors allow high design flexibility, EVs can be developed with a variety of drive systems. For this reason, various driving force distribution control methods can be considered based on the adopted system.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1679
Shingo Koumura, Takahiro Shionoya
Abstract A dynamics model considering series rigidity was constructed to examine suspension friction, which has a major effect on ride comfort on paved roads. The friction characteristics of the bushings, ball joints, and shock absorbers are expressed with series elastic elements such as arm rigidity and the spring constant of the oil seals. It was confirmed that the calculated values for the overall spring constant and damping coefficient of the suspension virtually matched values measured in a 4-post shaker test. In addition, the results of analysis using this dynamics model confirmed that the degree of friction affects both the damping coefficient and the spring constant of the suspension, especially when the series rigidity is high. Also highly rigid friction has an adverse effect on sprung motion in frequency ranges above 15 Hz. After suspension enhancements were adopted based on these findings, 4-post shaker tests confirmed that sprung motion above 2 Hz improved..
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1678
Etsuo Katsuyama, Ayana Omae
Abstract Vehicles equipped with in-wheel motors (IWMs) are capable of independent control of the driving force at each wheel. These vehicles can also control the motion of the sprung mass by driving force distribution using the suspension reaction force generated by IWM drive. However, one disadvantage of IWMs is an increase in unsprung mass. This has the effect of increasing vibrations in the 4 to 8 Hz range, which is reported to be uncomfortable to vehicle occupants, thereby reducing ride comfort. This research aimed to improve ride comfort through driving force control. Skyhook damper control is a typical ride comfort control method. Although this control is generally capable of reducing vibration around the resonance frequency of the sprung mass, it also has the trade-off effect of worsening vibration in the targeted mid-frequency 4 to 8 Hz range. This research aimed to improve mid-frequency vibration by identifying the cause of this adverse effect through the equations of motion.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1609
Yusuke Nakae, Jun Yamamura, Hiroshi Tanaka, Tsuyoshi Yasuki
Abstract The unsteady aerodynamic loads produced due to vehicle dynamic motions affect vehicle dynamic performance attributes such as straight-line stability or handling characteristics. To improve these dynamic performances, understanding the detailed mechanisms by which unsteady aerodynamic loads are caused during dynamic motions and the effects of unsteady aerodynamic loads on vehicle dynamic performance are needed. This paper describes the numerical study of unsteady aerodynamics of a 1/4 scale car model in dynamic pitching motion to clarify the detailed mechanisms by which unsteady aerodynamic loads are caused during the motion. Vortical structures around front wheelhouse and front under side of the body are analyzed by introducing schematic views to understand the mechanisms of unsteady flow fields. Furthermore, effects of aerodynamic devices devised based on the analyses on unsteady aerodynamics are discussed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0124
Andrew Scott Alden, Brian Mayer, Patrick Mcgowen, Rini Sherony, Hiroyuki Takahashi
Abstract Animal-vehicle collision (AVC) is a significant safety issue on American roads. Each year approximately 1.5 million AVCs occur in the U.S., the majority of them involving deer. The increasing use of cameras and radar on vehicles provides opportunities for prevention or mitigation of AVCs, particularly those involving deer or other large animals. Developers of such AVC avoidance/mitigation systems require information on the behavior of encountered animals, setting characteristics, and driver response in order to design effective countermeasures. As part of a larger study, naturalistic driving data were collected in high AVC incidence areas using 48 participant-owned vehicles equipped with data acquisition systems (DAS). Continuous driving data including forward video, location information, and vehicle kinematics were recorded. The respective 11TB dataset contains 35k trips covering 360K driving miles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0351
Yuki Kudo, Akinori Sato, Kazutaka Kimura, Shoichi Iwamoto, Hiroyuki Ohba, Motoya Sakabe, Yasuhiro Shirai
Abstract Replacing the metal car roof with conventional solar modules results in the increase of total car weight and change of center of mass, which is not preferable for car designing. Therefore, weight reduction is required for solar modules to be equipped on vehicles. Exchanging glass to plastic for the cover plate of solar module is one of the major approaches to reduce weight; however, load bearing property, impact resistance, thermal deformation, and weatherability become new challenges. In this paper a new solar module structure that weighs as light as conventional steel car roofs, resolving these challenges is proposed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0621
James Kapinski, Xiaoqing Jin, Jyotirmoy Deshmukh, Alexandre Donze, Tomoya Yamaguchi, Hisahiro Ito, Tomoyuki Kaga, Shunsuke Kobuna, Sanjit Seshia
Abstract Test and verification procedures are a vital aspect of the development process for embedded control systems in the automotive domain. Formal requirements can be used in automated procedures to check whether simulation or experimental results adhere to design specifications and even to perform automatic test and formal verification of design models; however, developing formal requirements typically requires significant investment of time and effort for control software designers. We propose Signal Template Library (ST-Lib), a uniform modeling language to encapsulate a number of useful signal patterns in a formal requirement language with the goal of facilitating requirement formulation for automotive control applications. ST-Lib consists of basic modules known as signal templates. Informally, these specify a characteristic signal shape and provide numerical parameters to tune the shape.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0692
Yasushi Yoshihara, Koichi Nakata, Daishi Takahashi, Tetsuo Omura, Atsuharu Ota
Abstract Improving vehicle fuel economy is a central part of efforts toward achieving a sustainable society. An effective way of accomplishing this is to enhance the engine thermal efficiency. Mitigating knock and reducing engine heat loss are important aspects of enhancing the thermal efficiency. Cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is regarded as a key technology because it is capable of achieving both of these objectives. For this reason, it has been adopted in a wide range of both hybrid vehicles and conventional vehicles in recent years. In EGR equipped engines, fast combustion is regarded as one of the most important technologies, since it realizes higher EGR ratio. To create fast combustion, generation of strong in-cylinder turbulence is necessary. Strong in-cylinder turbulence is achieved through swirl, squish, and tumble flows. Specifically high tumble flow has been adopted on a number of new engines because of the intense effect of promoting in-cylinder turbulence.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0684
Shinji Matsuo, Eiji Ikeda, Yoshiaki Ito, Hiroyuki Nishiura
Abstract The engine in the new fourth generation Prius carries over the same basic structure as the 2ZR-FXE used in the third generation and incorporates various refinements to enhance fuel efficiency. Called the ESTEC 2ZR-FXE, the new engine incorporates various fuel efficient technologies to improve combustion characteristics, knocking, and heat management, while also reducing friction. As a result of this meticulous approach to enhancing fuel efficiency, the new engine is the first gasoline engine in the world to achieve a maximum thermal efficiency of 40%. This paper describes the fuel efficient technologies incorporated into this engine.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0658
Tomoyuki Kogo, Yoshihiko Hamamura, Koichiro Nakatani, Tadashi Toda, Akio Kawaguchi, Akira Shoji
Abstract A highly efficient new 2.8-liter inline 4-cylinder diesel engine has been developed in response to growing demand for diesel engines and to help save energy while providing high-torque performance. Engine efficiency was improved by reducing cooling loss based on an innovative combustion concept applied across the whole engine. Cooling loss was reduced by restricting in-cylinder gas flows and improving combustion chamber insulation. To prevent the restricted gas flows from affecting emissions, a new combustion chamber shape was developed that increased air utilization in the cylinder through optimizing the in-cylinder fuel distribution. Combustion chamber insulation was improved by a new insulation coat that changes the wall surface temperature in accordance with the gas temperature. This reduces cooling loss and avoids the trade-off effect of intake air heating.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 419

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: