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Viewing 1 to 30 of 76
2014-04-23
Article
Virginia Tech and the University of Virginia have joined the global Rolls-Royce University Technology Centers (UTC) network, consisting of research groups in universities identified to develop long-term research and technology programs.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0530
Taewung Kim, Jason Kerrigan, Varun Bollapragada, Jeff Crandall, Ravi Tangirala, Michael Guerrero
Abstract Some rollover test methods, which impose a touchdown condition on a test vehicle, have been developed to study vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection in rollover crashes. In ground-tripped rollover crashes, speed, steering maneuver, braking, vehicle inertial and geometric properties, topographical and road design characteristics, and soil type can all affect vehicle touchdown conditions. It is presumed that while there may be numerous possible combinations of kinematic metrics (velocity components and orientation) at touchdown, there are also numerous combinations of metrics that are not likely to occur in rollover crashes. To determine a realistic set of touchdown conditions to be used in a vehicle rollover crash test, a lateral deceleration sled-based non-destructive rollover initiation test system (RITS) with a fully programmable deceleration pulse is in development.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0541
Gwansik Park, Taewung Kim, Jeff Crandall, Andy Svendsen, Nathaniel Saunders, Craig Markusic
Abstract The goal of this study was to evaluate the biofidelity of the three computational surrogates (GHBMC model, WorldSID model, and the FTSS ES-2re model) under the side impact rigid wall sled test condition. The responses of the three computational surrogates were compared to those of post mortem human surrogate (PMHS) and objectively evaluated using the correlation and analysis (CORA) rating method. Among the three computational surrogates, the GHBMC model showed the best biofidelity based on the CORA rating score (GHBMC =0.65, WorldSID =0.57, FTSS ES-2re =0.58). In general, the response of the pelvis of all the models showed a good correlation with the PMHS response, while the response of the shoulder and the lower extremity did not. In terms of fracture prediction, the GHBMC model overestimated bone fracture.
2011-11-07
Technical Paper
2011-22-0018
Sven Holcombe, Carla Kohoyda-Inglis, Lu Wang, James A. Goulet, Stewart C. Wang, Richard W. Kent
The size and shape of the acetabulum and of the femoral head influence the injury tolerance of the hip joint. The aim of this study is to quantify changes in acetabular cup geometry that occur with age, gender, height, and weight. Anonymized computed tomography (CT) scans of 1,150 individuals 16+ years of age, both with and without hip trauma, were used to describe the acetabular rim with 100 equally spaced points. Bilateral measurements were taken on uninjured patients, while only the uninjured side was valuated in those with hip trauma. Multinomial logistic regression found that after controlling for age, height, weight, and gender, each 1 degree decrease in acetabular anteversion angle (AAA) corresponded to an 8 percent increase in fracture likelihood (p≺0.001).
2011-06-11
Article
When three universities launched the Virginia Nanoelectronics Center (ViNC) in May, researchers gained a venue for sharing information to develop next-generation electronics.
2011-04-18
Article
Chromalloy, an independent supplier of advanced repairs, coatings, and FAA-approved replacement parts for turbine airfoils and critical engine components, will partner with Rolls-Royce as an Organizing Industry Member on the development of the new Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing (CCAM).
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1128
Neng Yue, Jaeho Shin, Costin D. Untaroiu
More than half of occupant lower extremity (LEX) injuries due to automotive frontal crashes are in the knee-thigh-hip (KTH) complex. To design the injury countermeasures for the occupant LEX, first the biomechanical and injury responses of the occupant LEX components during automotive frontal crashes should be known. The objective of this study is to develop a detailed biofidelic occupant LEX Finite Element (FE) model based on the component surfaces reconstructed from the medical image data of a 50th percentile male volunteer in a sitting posture. Both volumetric (unstructured) and structural mesh methods were used to generate the solid elements (mostly hexahedral type) to enhance the model simulation accuracy. The FE model includes the femur, tibia, fibula, patella, cartilage, ligaments, menisci, patella tendon, flesh, muscle, and skin. The constitutive material models and their corresponding parameters were defined based on literature data.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1123
Costin D. Untaroiu, Yuan-Chiao Lu
The THOR-NT dummy has been developed and continuously improved by NHTSA to provide automotive manufacturers an advanced tool that can be used to assess the injury risk of vehicle occupants in crash tests. With the recent improvements of finite element (FE) technology and the increase of computational power, a validated FE model of THOR may provide an efficient tool for the design optimization of vehicles and their restraint systems. The main goal of this study was to improve biofidelity of a head-neck FE model of THOR-NT dummy. A three-dimensional FE model of the head and neck was developed in LS-Dyna based on the drawings of the THOR dummy. The material properties of deformable parts and the joints properties between rigid parts were assigned initially based on data found in the literature, and then calibrated using optimization techniques.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1115
Daniel P. Parent, Jason Kerrigan, Jeff Crandall
Fatalities resulting from vehicle rollover events account for over one-third of all U.S. motor vehicle occupant fatalities. While a great deal of research has been directed towards the rollover problem, few studies have attempted to determine the sensitivity of occupant injury risk to variations in the vehicle (roof strength), crash (kinematic conditions at roof-to-ground contact), and occupant (anthropometry, position and posture) parameters that define the conditions of the crash. A two-part computational study was developed to examine the sensitivity of injury risk to changes in these parameters. The first part of this study, the Crash Parameter Sensitivity Study (CPSS), demonstrated the influence of parameters describing the vehicle and the crash on vehicle response using LS-DYNA finite element (FE) simulations.
2010-11-03
Technical Paper
2010-22-0015
Matthew W. Kindig, Anthony G. Lau, Jason L. Forman, Richard W. Kent
To improve understanding of structural coupling and deformation patterns throughout the loaded ribcage, the present study reports the force-displacement and kinematic responses under a highly localized loading condition using three PMHS ribcages (ages 44, 61, and 63 years). The ribcages were quasi-statically loaded locally to a non-failure displacement (nominally 15% of the ribcage depth at the loaded rib level) at approximately 25 unilateral locations and 5-7 geometrically symmetric bilateral locations on the anterior surface of each ribcage, for a total of 94 tests. The translations of 56 points distributed around the anterior, lateral, and posterior portions of the superficial surface of the ribcage were measured while under loading. Each of the first through sixth rib levels was then separated from the remaining ribs, and this "rib ring" structure was individually loaded at the sternum in the anterior-posterior direction.
2010-11-03
Technical Paper
2010-22-0014
David Lessley, Greg Shaw, Daniel Parent, Carlos Arregui-Dalmases, Matthew Kindig, Patrick Riley, Sergey Purtsezov, Mark Sochor, Thomas Gochenour, James Bolton, Damien Subit, Jeff Crandall, Shinichi Takayama, Koshiro Ono, Koichi Kamiji, Tsuyoshi Yasuki
The objective of the current study was to provide a comprehensive characterization of human biomechanical response to whole-body, lateral impact. Three approximately 50th-percentile adult male PMHS were subjected to right-side pure lateral impacts at 4.3 ± 0.1 m/s using a rigid wall mounted to a rail-mounted sled. Each subject was positioned on a rigid seat and held stationary by a system of tethers until immediately prior to being impacted by the moving wall with 100 mm pelvic offset. Displacement data were obtained using an optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system that was used to track the 3D motions of the impacting wall sled; seat sled, and reflective targets secured to the head, spine, extremities, ribcage, and shoulder complex of each subject. Kinematic data were also recorded using 3-axis accelerometer cubes secured to the head, pelvis, and spine at the levels of T1, T6, T11, and L3. Chest deformation in the transverse plane was recorded using a single chestband.
2009-11-02
Technical Paper
2009-22-0010
B. Johan Ivarsson, Daniel Genovese, Jeff R. Crandall, James R. Bolton, Costin D. Untaroiu, Dipan Bose
The likelihood of a front seat occupant sustaining a femoral shaft fracture in a frontal crash has traditionally been assessed by an injury criterion relying solely on the axial force in the femur. However, recently published analyses of real-world data indicate that femoral shaft fracture occurs at axial loads levels below those found experimentally. One hypothesis attempting to explain this discrepancy suggests that femoral shaft fracture tends to occur as a result of combined axial compression and applied bending. The current study aims to evaluate this hypothesis by investigating how these two loading components interact. Femoral shafts harvested from human cadavers were loaded to failure in axial compression, sagittal plane bending, and combined axial compression and sagittal plane bending.
2009-11-02
Technical Paper
2009-22-0012
Kristy B. Arbogast, Sriram Balasubramanian, Thomas Seacrist, Matthew R. Maltese, J. Felipe Garcia-Espana, Terrence Hopely, Eric Constans, Francisco J. Lopez-Valdes, Richard W. Kent, Hiromasa Tanji, Kazuo Higuchi
Previous research has suggested that the pediatric ATD spine, developed from scaling the adult ATD spine, may not adequately represent a child's spine and thus may lead to important differences in the ATD head trajectory relative to a human. To gain further insight into this issue, the objectives of this study were, through non-injurious frontal sled tests on human volunteers, to 1) quantify the kinematic responses of the restrained child's head and spine and 2) compare pediatric kinematic responses to those of the adult. Low-speed frontal sled tests were conducted using male human volunteers (20 subjects: 6-14 years old, 10 subjects: 18-40 years old), in which the safety envelope was defined from an amusement park bumper-car impact.
2009-11-02
Technical Paper
2009-22-0013
Richard Kent, Robert Salzar, Jason Kerrigan, Daniel Parent, David Lessley, Mark Sochor, Jason F. Luck, Andre Loyd, Yin Song, Roger Nightingale, Cameron R. 'Dale' Bass, Matthew R. Maltese
No experimental data exist quantifying the force-deformation behavior of the pediatric chest when subjected to non-impact, dynamic loading from a diagonal belt or a distributed loading surface. Kent et al., (2006) previously published juvenile abdominal response data collected using a porcine model. This paper reports on a series of experiments on a 7-year-old pediatric post-mortem human subject (PMHS) undertaken to guide the scaling of existing adult thoracic response data for application to the child and to assess the validity of the porcine abdominal model. The pediatric PMHS exhibited abdominal response similar to the swine, including the degree of rate sensitivity. The upper abdomen of the PMHS was slightly stiffer than the porcine behavior, while the lower abdomen of the PMHS fit within the porcine corridor. Scaling of adult thoracic response data using any of four published techniques did not successfully predict the pediatric behavior.
2009-11-02
Technical Paper
2009-22-0001
Greg Shaw, Dan Parent, Sergey Purtsezov, David Lessley, Jeff Crandall, Richard Kent, Herve Guillemot, Stephen A. Ridella, Erik Takhounts, Peter Martin
This study evaluated the response of restrained post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) in 40 km/h frontal sled tests. Eight male PMHS were restrained on a rigid planar seat by a custom 3-point shoulder and lap belt. A video motion tracking system measured three-dimensional trajectories of multiple skeletal sites on the torso allowing quantification of ribcage deformation. Anterior and superior displacement of the lower ribcage may have contributed to sternal fractures occurring early in the event, at displacement levels below those typically considered injurious, suggesting that fracture risk is not fully described by traditional definitions of chest deformation. The methodology presented here produced novel kinematic data that will be useful in developing biofidelic human models.
2009-11-02
Technical Paper
2009-22-0002
Jason Forman, Francisco Lopez-Valdes, David Lessley, Matthew Kindig, Richard Kent, Stephen Ridella, Ola Bostrom
Rear seat adult occupant protection is receiving increased attention from the automotive safety community. Recent anthropomorphic test device (ATD) studies have suggested that it may be possible to improve kinematics and reduce injuries to rear seat occupants in frontal collisions by incorporating shoulder-belt force-limiting and pretensioning (FL+PT) technologies into rear seat 3-point belt restraints. This study seeks to further investigate the feasibility and potential kinematic benefits of a FL+PT rear seat, 3-point belt restraint system in a series of 48 kmh frontal impact sled tests (20 g, 80 ms sled acceleration pulse) performed with post mortem human surrogates (PMHS). Three PMHS were tested with a 3-point belt restraint with a progressive (two-stage) force limiting and pretensioning retractor in a sled buck representing the rear seat occupant environment of a 2004 mid-sized sedan.
2009-04-20
Journal Article
2009-01-0760
Michael A. Reynolds, Carl R. Elks, Nishant George, Meenakshi Sekhar, Todd DeLong, Barry W. Johnson
Given the increased use of programmable embedded electronic systems (PEES) in automotive applications and their vital importance, it is not only important for engineers to design PEES in such a way to meet or exceed safety requirements but also quantify how “safe” these systems are. At the University of Virginia's Center for Safety-Critical Systems, we have developed a safety quantification methodology for embedded real time safety-related systems. The goal of the safety quantification methodology is to provide a generic but rigorous and systematic way of characterizing the dependability behavior of embedded systems that is applicable to a broad range of applications from automotive to nuclear. This paper presents a quantitative safety assessment methodology for safety-critical embedded systems using fault injection (FI). This methodology has been developed, refined and applied to a number of commercial safety-grade systems in the railway, nuclear and avionics industries.
2008-12-02
Journal Article
2008-01-2978
Robert S. Salzar, Cameron R. ‘Dale’ Bass, Joseph A. Pellettiere
As accurate measuring of head accelerations is an important aspect in predicting head injury, it is important that the measuring sensor be well-coupled to the head. Various sensors and sensor mounting schemes have been attempted in the past with varying results. This study uses a small, implantable acceleration sensor pack in the ear to study impact coupling with the human skull. The output from these ear-mounted accelerometers is compared to laboratory reference accelerometers rigidly attached to the skull of two cadaveric head specimens for both low-amplitude oscillatory tests and high-amplitude impact drop tests. The combination of sensor type and mounting scheme demonstrates the feasibility of using ear mounted sensors to predict head acceleration response. Previously reported progressive phase lag was not seen in this study, with the comparison between ear mounted accelerometers and rigidly mounted head accelerometers ranging from very good to excellent.
2008-11-03
Technical Paper
2008-22-0012
Jarett Michaelson, Jason Forman, Richard Kent, Shashi Kuppa
Very little experimental research has focused on the kinematics, dynamics, and injuries of rear-seated occupants. This study seeks to develop a baseline response for rear-seated post mortem human surrogates (PMHS) in frontal crashes. Three PMHS sled tests were performed in a sled buck designed to represent the interior rear-seat compartment of a contemporary midsized sedan. All occupants were positioned in the right-rear passenger seat and subjected to simulated frontal crashes with an impact speed of 48 km/h. The subjects were restrained by a standard, rear seat, 3-point seat belt. The response of each subject was evaluated in terms of whole-body kinematics, dynamics, and injury. All the PMHS experienced excessive forward translation of the pelvis resulting in a backward rotation of the torso at the time of maximum forward excursion.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1432
Timothy C. Scott, Jason Uphold
Power steering systems provide significant design challenges. They are detrimental to fuel economy since most require the continuous operation of a hydraulic pump. This generates heat that must be dissipated by fluid lines and heat exchangers. This paper presents a simple one-dimensional transient model for power steering components. The model accounts for the pump power, heat dissipation from fluid lines, the power steering cooler, and the influence of radiation heat from exhaust system components. The paper also shows how to use a transient thermal model of the entire system to simulate the temperatures during cyclic operation of the system. The implications to design, drive cycle simulation, and selection of components are highlighted.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1233
Robert G. Kendall, Christopher P. Sherwood, Jeff R. Crandall
A recent study of U.S. crash data has shown that children 0-23 months of age in forward-facing child restraint systems (FFCRS) are 76% more likely to be seriously injured in comparison to children in rear-facing child restraint systems (RFCRS). Motivated by the epidemiological data, seven sled tests of dummies in child seats were performed at the University of Virginia using a crash pulse similar to FMVSS 213 test conditions. The tests showed an advantage for RFCRS; however, real-world crashes include a great deal of variability among factors that may affect the relative performance of FFCRS and RFCRS. Therefore, this research developed MADYMO computational models of these tests and varied several real-world parameters. These models used ellipsoid models of Q-series child dummies and facet surface models of American- and Swedish- style convertible child restraints (CRS).
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1433
Timothy C. Scott, Dhananjay S. Joshi, Frank Chianese
In 1972, the first SAE paper describing the use of computer simulation as a design tool for automotive air conditioning was written by these authors. Since then, many such simulations have been used and new tools such as CFD have been applied to this problem. This paper reviews the work over that past 35 years and presents several of the improvements in the basic component and system models that have occurred. The areas where “empirical” information is required for model support and the value of CFD cabin and external air flow modeling are also discussed.
2007-10-29
Technical Paper
2007-22-0018
Costin Untaroiu, Jason Kerrigan, Check Kam, Jeff Crandall, Kunio Yamazaki, Keisuke Fukuyama, Koichi Kamiji, Tsuyoshi Yasuki, James Funk
The purpose of this study is to determine the loads in the long bones of the lower extremities during vehicle pedestrian impact tests, and to correlate load data with observed kinematics in an effort to understand how stature and vehicle shape influence pedestrian response. In tests with a large sedan and a small multi-purpose vehicle (MPV), four postmortem human surrogates (PMHS) in mid-stance gait were struck laterally at 40 km/h. Prior to the tests, each PMHS was instrumented with four uniaxial strain gages around the mid-shaft cross section of the struck-side (right) tibia and the femora bilaterally. After the tests, the non-fractured bones were harvested and subjected to three-point bending experiments. The effective elastic moduli were determined by relating the applied bending loads with the measured strains using strain gage locations, detailed bone geometry, and elastic beam theory.
2007-10-29
Technical Paper
2007-22-0010
Sang-Hyun Lee, Richard Kent
Traumatic aortic rupture (TAR) accounts for a significant mortality in automobile crashes. A numerical method by means of a mesh-based code coupling is employed to elucidate the injury mechanism of TAR. The aorta is modeled as a single-layered thick wall composed of two families of collagen fibers using an anisotropic strain energy function with consideration of viscoelasticity. A set of constitutive parameters is identified from experimental data of the human aorta, providing strict local convexity. An in vitro aorta model reconstructed from the Visible Human dataset is applied to the pulsatile blood flow to establish the references of mechanical quantities for physiological conditions. A series of simulations is performed using the parameterized impact pulses obtained from frontal sled tests.
2007-10-29
Technical Paper
2007-01-4078
Jeffrey M. Guevremont, Greg Guinther, Tze-Chi Jao, Tim Herlihy, Richard White, Jim Howe
The poisoning of three way catalysts (TWC) by the phosphorus contained in oil formulations containing zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) is examined. Catalysts were exposed to various types of ZDDP and detergents under conditions that were known to reduce performance through phosphorus poisoning without the blocking of sites by formation of glazing. The presence of phosphorus was detected with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). In addition to analyzing the surface concentration of the phosphorus on the washcoat, the catalyst was cross cut so phosphorus that diffused into the washcoat could be mapped. The total phosphorus in the catalyst could then be calculated. The amount of total phosphorus detected correlated well with the reduced activity of the catalyst as measured by the temperature of 50% conversion.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0595
Timothy C. Scott, Zhe Xie
One Dimensional models for front end air flows through the cooling system package are very useful for evaluating the effects of component and front end geometry changes. To solve such models for the air flow requires a robust iterative process that involves a number of non-linear sub-models. The cooling fan (s) constitute a major part of the difficulty, especially when they employ a viscous or “thermal” fan drive. This drive varies the torque coupling between the input and output shafts based on the radiator outlet air temperature. The coupling is achieved by viscous shear between two grooved disks and is regulated by a bimetal strip valve that varies the amount of fluid between the disks. This paper presents a mathematical model by which the input/output speed ratio may be determined as a function of the air temperature and input speed. Coefficients in the model are estimated from standard supplier performance information.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0596
Timothy C. Scott, Shan Sundaram
Simple component models are advantageous when simulating vehicle AC systems so that overall model complexity and computation time can be minimized. These models must be robust enough to avoid instability in the iteration method used for determining the AC system operating or “balance” point. Simplicity and stability are especially important when the AC system model is coupled with a vehicle interior model for studies of transient performance because these are more computationally intensive. This paper presents a semi-empirical modeling method for compressors based on dimensionless parameters. Application to some sample compressor data is illustrated. The model equations are simple to employ and will not introduce significant stability problems when used as part of a system simulation.
2006-11-06
Technical Paper
2006-22-0008
Daisuke Murakami, Seiichi Kobayashi, Toshikazu Torigaki, Richard Kent
Thoracic trauma is the principle causative factor in 30% of road traffic deaths. Researchers have developed force-deflection corridors of the thorax for various loading conditions in order to elucidate injury mechanisms and to validate the mechanical response of ATDs and numerical human models. A corridor, rather than a single response characteristic, results from the variability inherent in biological experimentation. This response variability is caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The intrinsic factors are associated with individual differences among human subjects, e.g., the differences in material properties and in body geometry. The extrinsic sources of variability include fluctuations in the loading and supporting conditions in experimental tests.
2006-11-06
Technical Paper
2006-22-0009
Jason Forman, David Lessley, C. Greg Shaw, Jay Evans, Richard Kent, Stephen W. Rouhana, Priya Prasad
Injury to the thorax is the predominant cause of fatalities in crash-involved automobile occupants over the age of 65, and many elderly-occupant automobile fatalities occur in crashes below compliance or consumer information test speeds. As the average age of the automotive population increases, thoracic injury prevention in lower severity crashes will play an increasingly important role in automobile safety. This study presents the results of a series of sled tests to investigate the thoracic deformation, kinematic, and injury responses of belted post-mortem human surrogates (PMHS, average age 44 years) and frontal anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) in low-speed frontal crashes. Nine 29 km/h (three PMHS, three Hybrid III 50th% male ATD, three THOR-NT ATD) and three 38 km/h (one PMHS, two Hybrid III) frontal sled tests were performed to simulate an occupant seated in the right front passenger seat of a mid-sized sedan restrained with a standard (not force-limited) 3-point seatbelt.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1567
Tariq Assaf, Joanne Bechta Dugan
We propose to enhance reliability based diagnosis by enhancing the fault tree model with a sensor layer for capturing evidence. We recognized the need for an automated diagnostic process that can predict and report component failure in vehicles prior to total failure of any system in the vehicle. We also want to take advantage of evidence that can be derived from sensors to reduce the amount of tests required to identify failed components.
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