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Viewing 1 to 30 of 85
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Raimo Kabral, Lin Du, Mats Åbom, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract Current trends for IC-engines are driving the development of more efficient engines with higher specific power. This is true for both light and heavy duty vehicles and has led to an increased use of super-charging. The super-charging can be both in the form of a single or multi-stage turbo-charger driven by exhaust gases, or via a directly driven compressor. In both cases a possible noise problem can be a strong Blade Passing Frequency (BPF) typically in the kHz range and above the plane wave range. In this paper a novel type of compact dissipative silencer developed especially to handle this type of problem is described and optimized. The silencer is based on a combination of a micro-perforated (MPP) tube backed by a locally reacting cavity. The combined impedance of micro-perforate and cavity is chosen to match the theoretical optimum known as the Cremer impedance at the mid-frequency in the frequency range of interest. Due to the high damping achieved at the Cremer optimum (hundreds of dB/m) it is easy to create a compact silencer with a significant damping (say > 30 dB) in a range larger than an octave.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Lennert Sterken, Simone Sebben, Tim Walker, Lennart Lofdahl
With the increase in fuel prices and the increasingly strict environmental legislations regarding CO₂ emissions, reduction of the total energy consumption of our society becomes more important. Passenger vehicles are partly responsible for this consumption due to their strong presence in the daily life of most people. Therefore reducing the impact of cars on the environment can assist in decreasing the overall energy consumption. Even though several fields have an impact on a passenger car's performance, this paper will focus on the aerodynamic part and more specifically, the wake behind a vehicle. By definition a car is a bluff body on which the air resistance is for the most part driven by pressure drag. This is caused by the wake these bodies create. Therefore analyzing the wake characteristics behind a vehicle is crucial if one would like to reduce drag. With the recent upgrade of wind tunnels with a moving belt system, the opportunity has emerged to investigate the flow field in the wake behind vehicles, matching closer the real on-road driving conditions.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Alexey Vdovin, Sabine Bonitz, Christoffer Landstrom, Lennart Lofdahl
Passenger car fuel consumption is a constant concern for automotive companies and the contribution to fuel consumption from aerodynamics is well known. Several studies have been published on the aerodynamics of wheels. One area of wheel aerodynamics discussed in some of these earlier works is the so-called ventilation resistance. This study investigates ventilation resistance on a number of 17 inch rims, in the Volvo Cars Aerodynamic Wind Tunnel. The ventilation resistance was measured using a custom-built suspension with a tractive force measurement system installed in the Wheel Drive Units (WDUs). The study aims at identifying wheel design factors that have significant effect on the ventilation resistance for the investigated wheel size. The results show that it was possible to measure similar power requirements to rotate the wheels as was found in previous works. The magnitude of the measured ventilation resistance confirms the conclusion that this effect should be taken into account when designing a wheel.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Teddy Hobeika, Simone Sebben, Christoffer Landstrom
It is well known that wheels are responsible for a significant amount of the total aerodynamic drag of passenger vehicles. Tyres, and mostly rims, have been the subject of research in the automotive industry for the past years, but their effect and interaction with each other and with the car exterior is still not completely understood. This paper focuses on the use of CFD to study the effects of tyre geometry (tyre profile and tyre tread) on road vehicle aerodynamics. Whenever possible, results of the numerical computations are compared with experiments. More than sixty configurations were simulated. These simulations combined different tyre profiles, treads, rim designs and spoke orientation on two car types: a sedan and a sports wagon. Two tyre geometries were obtained directly from the tyre manufacturer, while a third geometry was obtained from our database and represents a generic tyre which covers different profiles of a given tyre size. All geometries were deformed based on measured wind tunnel data under a defined load and rotating conditions of 100 kph.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Lotta Jakobsson, Graeme McInally, Anders Axelson, Magdalena Lindman, Anders Kling, Thomas Broberg, Mikael Fermér, Linus Wågström
Frontal Severe Partial Overlap Collisions (SPOC) also called small overlap crashes pose special challenges with respect to structural design as well as occupant protection. In the early 1990s, the SPOC test method was developed addressing 20-40% overlap against a fixed rigid barrier with initial velocities up to 65 km/h. The knowledge gained has been used in the design of Volvo vehicles since then. Important design principles include front side members orientated along the wheel envelopes together with a strong support structure utilizing a space frame principle with beams loaded mainly in tension and compression. This novel setup was first introduced in the 850-model in 1991 and has been refined and patented (2001) in later Volvo front structures. Among the design principles are multiple front side members on each side, helping energy absorption efficiency and robustness. The upper side members absorb energy and also transfer the forces via the A-pillars into the roof and the reinforced body and door structures.
Technical Paper
2012-09-10
Fredrik B. Ekstrom, Joop Somhorst
Passenger cars equipped with diesel engines will meet challenging emission legislation for the coming decade, with introduction of Euro6 and Euro7, which comprises reduced NOX emissions and possibly new driving cycles including off-cycle limits. The technology measures to meet these legislative limits comprise a broad spectrum of engine and aftertreatment, i.e., engine measures such as improved fuel injection with respect to mass and timing, improved exhaust gas recirculation, improved warm-up and reduced friction, as well as aftertreatment measures such as selective catalytic reduction and lean NOX trap in combination with diesel particulate filter, and the thereby associated engine control. The resulting technology matrix is therefore large, and calls for a multidisciplinary simulation approach for appropriate selection and optimization of technology and control with the objectives and constraints of emissions, fuel consumption, performance and cost. The idea behind multidisciplinary simulation is to include all subcomponents of the powertrain into a complete system simulation model, in order to study the influence of and interaction between subsystems on emissions, fuel consumption and cost of the complete powertrain.
Technical Paper
2012-06-13
Sabry Allam, Magnus Knutsson, Hans Boden
Automotive turbo compressors generate high frequency noise in the air intake system. This sound generation is of importance for the perceived sound quality of luxury cars and may need to be controlled by the use of silencers. The silencers usually contain resonators with slits, perforates and cavities. The purpose of the present work is to develop acoustic models for these resonators where relevant effects such as the effect of a realistic mean flow on losses and 3D effects are considered. An experimental campaign has been performed where the two-port matrices and transmission loss of sample resonators have been measured without flow and for two different mean flow speeds. Models for two resonators have been developed using 1D linear acoustic theory and a FEM code (COMSOL Multi-physics). For some resonators a separate linear 1D Matlab code has also been developed. Different models, from the literature, for including the effect of mean flow on the acoustic losses at slits and perforates have been implemented in the codes and compared to the experimental data.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Markus Grahn, Krister Johansson, Christian Vartia, Tomas McKelvey
The development and implementation of a new structure for data-driven models for NOX and soot emissions is described. The model structure is a linear regression model, where physically relevant input signals are used as regressors, and all the regression parameters are defined as grid-maps in the engine speed/injected fuel domain. The method of using grid-maps in the engine speed/injected fuel domain for all the regression parameters enables the models to be valid for changes in physical parameters that affect the emissions, without having to include these parameters as input signals to the models. This is possible for parameters that are dependent only on the engine speed and the amount of injected fuel. This means that models can handle changes for different parameters in the complete working range of the engine, without having to include all signals that actually effect the emissions into the models. The approach possibly also enables for the model to handle the main differences between steady-state engine operation and transient engine operation, thus possibly being able to use steady-state engine measurement data to calibrate the model, but still achieve acceptable performance for transient engine operation.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Antonio Torregrosa, Francisco Arnau, Pedro Piqueras, Miguel Reyes-Belmonte, Magnus Knutsson, Johan Lennblad
An acoustic one-dimensional compressor model has been developed. This model is based on compressor map information and it is able to predict how the pressure waves are transmitted and reflected by the compressor. This is later on necessary to predict radiated noise at the intake orifice. The fluid-dynamic behavior of the compressor has been reproduced by simplifying the real geometry in zero-dimensional and one-dimensional elements with acoustic purposes. These elements are responsible for attenuating or reflecting the pressure pulses generated by the engine. In order to compensate the effect of these elements in the mean flow variables, the model uses a corrected compressor map. Despite of the fact that the compressor model was developed originally as a part of the OpenWAM™ software, it can be exported to other commercial wave action models. An example is provided of exporting the described model to GT-Power™. The model has been validated using experimental results obtained in a turbocharger test bench under pulsating flow conditions.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Christoffer Landstrom, Linda Josefsson, Tim Walker, Lennart Lofdahl
Targets for reducing emissions and improving energy efficiency present the automotive industry with many challenges. Passenger cars are by far the most common means of personal transport in the developed part of the world, and energy consumption related to personal transportation is predicted to increase significantly in the coming decades. Improved aerodynamic performance of passenger cars will be one of many important areas which will occupy engineers and researchers for the foreseeable future. The significance of wheels and wheel housings is well known today, but the relative importance of the different components has still not been fully investigated. A number of investigations highlighting the importance of proper ground simulation have been published, and recently a number of studies on improved aerodynamic design of the wheel have been presented as well. This study is an investigation of aerodynamic influences of different tires. Two different tire models were investigated in combination with three different wheel designs using the Volvo Aerodynamic Wind Tunnel; including moving ground and rotating wheels.
Technical Paper
2011-09-11
Andreas W. Berntsson, Göran Josefsson, Roy Ekdahl, Roy Ogink, Börje Grandin
Direct gasoline injection combined with turbo charging and down sizing is a cost effective concept to meet future requirements for emission reduction as well as increased efficiency for passenger cars. It is well known that turbulence induced by in-cylinder air motion can influence efficiency. In this study, the intake-generated flow field was varied for a direct injected turbo charged concept, with the intent to evaluate if further increase in tumble potentially could lead to higher efficiency compared to the baseline. A single cylinder head with flow separating walls in the intake ports and different restriction plates was used to allow different levels of tumble to be experimentally evaluated in a single cylinder engine. The different levels of tumble were quantified by flow rig experiments. Two series of experiments were performed, one aiming to evaluate tumble in the region of low to medium load and engine speed, mainly focusing on efficiency, and one for the high load region to evaluate any negative consequences of increased tumble.
Technical Paper
2011-06-09
Klaas Burgdorf
Maintaining the current ratio between certified and the customer-observed fuel consumption even with future required levels poses a considerable challenge. Increasing the efficiency of the driveline enables certified fuel consumption down to a feasible level in the order of 80 g CO₂/km using fossil fuels. Mainly affecting off-cycle fuel consumption, energy amounts used to create good interior climate as well as energy-consuming options and features threaten to further increase. Progressing urbanization will lead to decreasing average vehicle speeds and driving distances. Highly efficient powertrains come with decreased amounts of waste energy traditionally used for interior climate conditioning, thus making necessary a change of auxiliary systems. The recent rapid success in lowering the certified fuel consumption following the announcement of coming regulations is according to introduction of readily available technology and re-balancing of attributes using existing industrialized concepts.
Technical Paper
2011-05-17
Magnus Knutsson, Johan Lennblad, Hans Bodén, Mats Abom
Analysis of pressure pulsations in ducts is an active research field within the automotive industry. The fluid dynamics and the wave transmission properties of internal combustion (IC) engine intake and exhaust systems contribute to the energy efficiency of the engines and are hence important for the final amount of CO₂ that is emitted from the vehicles. Sound waves, originating from the pressure pulses caused by the in- and outflow at the engine valves, are transmitted through the intake and exhaust system and are an important cause of noise pollution from road traffic at low speeds. Reliable prediction methods are of major importance to enable effective optimization of gas exchange systems. The use of nonlinear one-dimensional (1D) gas dynamics simulation software packages is widespread within the automotive industry. These time-domain codes are mainly used to predict engine performance parameters such as output torque and power but can also give estimates of radiated orifice noise.
Technical Paper
2011-05-17
Andrzej Pietrzyk
A broad measurement campaign was run at Volvo aiming at the evaluation of dispersion in test-based NVH characteristics of a car body and at the derivation of reference data for judging the accuracy of CAE predictions. Within this work 6, nominally identical, vehicles were tested. Tests included operational noise on Complete Vehicle (CV) level (road noise, engine noise and idling noise), NTF, VTF & Acoustic FRF measurements in CV, Trimmed Body (TB) & TB-Stripped (TBS) configurations. Additionally, modal analysis and NTF, VTF, AFRF tests were carried out on 4 BIPs of the same vehicle type. Further, limited tests were carried out on 28 vehicles of the same type. The aim of the work was to study the development of dispersion with increasing complexity of the test object, from the BIP to TB and CV. In this respect this study is unique - there has been several studies regarding the dispersion in test results but the studies that trace the dispersion between different levels of complexity of the test object are scarce if not non-existent.
Technical Paper
2011-05-17
Magnus Olsson, Mikael Törmänen, Sylvain Sauvage, Catharina Hansen
In modern vehicles, each system must meet tough demands to fulfill the many different attribute requirements, design constraints and manufacturing limitations. It becomes difficult and time-consuming to find an optimal and robust design using a traditional engineering process. Volvo Cars has for several years been using Multi-Disciplinary Optimization, MDO, that basically shows the customer attributes levels, such as NVH, ride comfort, and driveability as a function of different parameter configurations. This greatly facilitates project team understanding of the limitations and possibilities of the different systems, and has become a key enabler to achieving a good balance between different attributes. Traditionally, this type of comprehensive Design of Experiments (DOE) optimization demands huge time and computer resources. Frequently, experimental designs will not fulfill manufacturing limitations or attribute targets, making this decision process slow, tedious, and fruitless. In this paper, a systematic Multi-Disciplinary Optimization process is presented that considerably reduces the required resources and time.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Christoffer Landström, Tim Walker, Lasse Christoffersen, Lennart Löfdahl
Efforts towards ever more energy efficient passenger cars have become one of the largest challenges of the automotive industry. This involves numerous different fields of engineering, and every finished model is always a compromise between different requirements. Passenger car aerodynamics is no exception; the shape of the exterior is often dictated by styling, engine bay region by packaging issues etcetera. Wheel design is also a compromise between different requirements such as aerodynamic drag and brake cooling, but as the wheels and wheel housings are responsible for up to a quarter of the overall aerodynamic drag on a modern passenger car, it is not surprising that efforts are put towards improving the wheel aerodynamics. The actual force on the wheels is typically not a full quarter of the overall drag, but as the wheels strongly interact with several other key flow features such as cooling air flow, underbody flow and the base wake, the wheels have a large influence on the overall aerodynamic performance of the vehicle.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Anders Wirje, Kristian Carlsson
The durability peak load events Driving over a curb and Skid against a curb have been simulated in Adams for a Volvo S80. Simulated responses in the front wheel suspension have been validated by comparison with measurements. Due to the extreme nature of the peak load events, the component modeling is absolutely critical for the accuracy of the simulations. All components have to be described within their full range of excitation. Key components and behaviors to model have been identified as tire with wheel strike-through, contacts between curb and tire and between curb and rim, flexibility of structural components, bump stops, bushings, shock absorbers, and camber stiffness of the suspension. Highly non-linear component responses are captured in Adams. However, since Adams only allows linear material response for flexible bodies, the proposed methods to simulate impact loads are only valid up to small, plastic strains. This paper discusses both the simulations as well as the modeling techniques adopted.
Technical Paper
2009-06-15
Daniel Dahl, Mats Andersson, Andreas Berntsson, Ingemar Denbratt, Lucien Koopmans
Future demands for improvements in the fuel economy of gasoline passenger car engines will require the development and implementation of advanced combustion strategies, to replace, or combine with the conventional spark ignition strategy. One possible strategy is homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) achieved using negative valve overlap (NVO). However, several issues need to be addressed before this combustion strategy can be fully implemented in a production vehicle, one being to increase the upper load limit. One constraint at high loads is the combustion becoming too rapid, leading to excessive pressure-rise rates and large pressure fluctuations (ringing), causing noise. In this work, efforts were made to reduce these pressure fluctuations by using a late injection during the later part of the compression. A more appropriate acronym than HCCI for such combustion is SCCI (Stratified Charge Compression Ignition). The approach was evaluated in tests with a single-cylinder metal research engine and a single-cylinder optical engine.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Öivind Andersson, Joop Somhorst, Ronny Lindgren, Roger Blom, Mattias Ljungqvist
The development of a new combustion system for a light-duty diesel engine is presented. The soot-NOx trade-off is significantly improved with maintained or improved efficiency. This is accomplished only by altering the combustion chamber geometry, and thereby the in-cylinder flow. The bowl geometry is developed in CFD and validated in single cylinder tests. Tests and simulations align remarkably well. Under identical conditions in the engine the new combustion chamber decreases smoke by 11-27%, NOx by 2-11%, and maintains efficiency as compared to the baseline geometry. The injector nozzle is matched to the new bowl using design of experiments (DoE). By this method transfer functions are obtained that can be used to optimize the system using analytical tools. The emissions show a complex dependence on the nozzle geometry. The emission dependence on nozzle geometry varies greatly over the engine operating range. Finally, the system's robustness is optimized using a Monte Carlo simulation approach, to maximize the distance from the failure mode.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Per Olsson
This paper presents how hardware in the loop (HIL) simulations have been used for testing during the development of the adaptive cruise control (ACC) and collision warning with brake support (CWBS) functions implemented in the Volvo S80. Both the brake system controller and the controller where the ACC and CWBS functions were implemented were tested. The HIL simulator was used for automated batch simulations in which different controller software releases were analyzed from both system, fail-safe and functional performance perspectives. This paper presents the challenges and the benefits of using HIL simulations when developing distributed active safety functions. Some specific simulation results are analyzed and discussed. The conclusion shows that although it is difficult and time-consuming to develop a complete HIL simulation environment for active safety functions such as ACC and CWBS, the benefits justify the investment. For the development of distributed active safety functions, HIL simulations are invaluable, when considering the short development times required in the automotive industry.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Jakob Axelsson
Six Sigma is a development methodology which emphasizes objective evaluations based on facts and measurements. However, for some problems the information is inherently subjective, with large individual variations. Also, in the early development phases, it may be difficult to define measurable metrics that correctly capture the important qualities. The vehicle HMI is a good example of such an application. In this paper, we present experiences of applying Design for Six Sigma methods to the early development phases of an automotive HMI. The focus of the paper is on how to handle uncertainties and vague subjective information.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Fredrik Törner, D. J. Chen, Rolf Johansson, Henrik Lönn, Martin Törngren
Automotive electronic systems are becoming safety related causing a need for more systematic and stringent approaches for demonstrating the functional safety. The safety case consists of an argumentation, supported by evidence, of why the system is safe to operate in a given context. It is dependent on referencing and aggregating information which is part of the EAST-ADL2, an architecture description language for automotive embedded systems. This paper explores the possibilities of integrating the safety case metamodel with the EAST-ADL2, enabling safety case development in close connection to the system model. This is done by including a safety case object in EAST-ADL2, and defining the external and internal relations. Combined with the support for structured information management and systematic safety/reliability analysis, the EAST-ADL2's ability to support a safety case is shown and further benefits, as high level of traceability between the safety case and the design information, are identified.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Lasse Christoffersen, David Söderblom, Lennart Löfdahl, Anders Jönson
During the development of the aerodynamic properties of fore coming road vehicles down scaled models are often used in the initial phase. However, if scale models are to be utilised even further in the aerodynamic development they have to include geometrical representatives of most of the components found in the real vehicle. As the cooling package is one of the biggest single generators of aerodynamic drag the heat exchangers are essential to include in a wind tunnel model. However, due mainly to limitations in manufacturing techniques it is complicated to make a down scaled heat exchanger and instead functional dummy heat exchangers have to be developed for scaled wind tunnel models. In this work a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code has been used to show that it is important that the simplified heat exchanger model has to be of comparable size to that of the full scale unit. Based on the findings of the CFD simulations a physical model of a heat exchanger was developed and presented in this article.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Daniel Dahl, Ingemar Denbratt, Lucien Koopmans
Future pressures to reduce the fuel consumption of passenger cars may require the exploitation of alternative combustion strategies for gasoline engines to replace, or use in combination with the conventional stoichiometric spark ignition (SSI) strategy. Possible options include homogeneous lean charge spark ignition (HLCSI), stratified charge spark ignition (SCSI) and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), all of which are intended to reduce pumping and thermal losses. In the work presented here four different combustion strategies were evaluated using the same engine: SSI, HLCSI, SCSI and HCCI. HLCSI was achieved by early injection and operating the engine lean, close to its stability limits. SCSI was achieved using the spray-guided technique with a centrally placed multi-hole injector and spark-plug. HCCI was achieved using a negative valve overlap to trap hot residuals and thus generate auto-ignition temperatures at the end of the compression stroke. The experiments were performed using a 6 cylinder, 3.2 liter Volvo engine equipped with cam profile switching (CPS), variable cam timing (VCT) for both intake and exhaust valves, and a spray guided direct injection (SGDI) system.
Technical Paper
2007-05-15
Andrzej Pietrzyk, Tage Bengtsson
The low frequency acoustic response of the passenger compartment (cavity) in sedans is considered with respect to the coupling between the cavity and the trunk. Both acoustic (via holes in the parcel shelf or behind the backrest of the rear seat), and structural (via the parcel shelf itself, or the panel of the backrest) mechanisms are investigated by both test and CAE. It is found that the peaks in acoustic response of the cavity at low frequencies are due to both acoustic and structural phenomena. However, the acoustic ones can be effectively blocked by proper design of the trim. Recommendations concerning modeling of acoustic effects in sedans are formulated.
Technical Paper
2007-04-16
M. Laurell, J. Dahlgren, J. Väisänen
The S40/V50 PZEV (partial zero emission vehicle) model year (MY) 2007 has an upgraded hardware configuration for improved PZEV capability balanced with the best possible customer attributes. The base engine is the Volvo naturally aspirated inline 5-cylinder that, together with new technology, achieves PZEV emission performance with maximum cost efficiency. The engine out emissions were reduced by a newly-developed injection synchronization strategy during engine crank. The reduced number of engine revolutions during crank result in less hydrocarbon (HC) emissions from the cylinder pumping effect prior to the first cylinder combustion. Thanks to the Volvo developed start strategy that during lean lambda operation generates an extreme temperature ramp in the front part of the catalyst in a very early phase after cold start, in combination with a new unique oxygen-sensor installation, catalyst control is started extremely early. Furthermore, with a new catalyst installation gas mixing has been enhanced.
Technical Paper
2007-04-16
Uwe Horn, Rolf Egnell, Bengt Johansson, Öivind Andersson
Experiments on a modern DI Diesel engine were carried out: The engine was fuelled with standard Diesel fuel, RME and a mixture of 85% standard Diesel fuel, 5% RME and 10% higher alcohols under low load conditions (4 bar IMEP). During these experiments, different external EGR levels were applied while the injection timing was chosen in a way to keep the location of 50% heat release constant. Emission analysis results were in accordance with widely known correlations: Increasing EGR rates lowered NOx emissions. This is explained by a decrease of global air-fuel ratio entailing longer ignition delay. Local gas-fuel ratio increases during ignition delay and local combustion temperature is lowered. Exhaust gas analysis indicated further a strong increase of CO, PM and unburned HC emissions at high EGR levels. This resulted in lower combustion efficiency. PM emissions however, decreased above 50% EGR which was also in accordance with previously reported results. Besides those similar trends, fuel dependent differences in indicated thermal efficiency as well as CO, HC, NOx and especially PM emissions were observed.
Technical Paper
2007-01-23
Martin Larsson, Ingemar Denbratt, Lucien Koopmans
Ion current sensors have high potential utility for obtaining feedback signals directly from the combustion chamber in internal combustion engines. This paper describes experiments performed in a single-cylinder optical engine operated in HCCI mode with negative valve overlap to explore this potential. A high-speed CCD camera was used to visualize the combustion progress in the cylinder, and the photographs obtained were compared with the ion current signals. The optical data indicate that the ions responsible for the chemiluminescence from the HCCI combustion have to be in contact with the sensing electrode for an ion current to start flowing through the measurement circuit. This also means that there will be an offset between the time at which 50% of the fuel mass has burned and 50% of the ion current peak value is reached, which is readily explained by the results presented in the paper. In addition the results show that the ion current sensor generates good combustion phasing signals for HCCI combustion with negative valve overlap at low engine speeds and low engine loads, provided that the electrode area and bias voltage are both sufficiently large.
Technical Paper
2006-10-16
Fredrik Törner, Per Johannessen, Peter Öhman
Many automotive electronic systems must be developed using a safety process. A preliminary hazard analysis is a first and an important step in such a process. This experimental study evaluates two methods for hazard identification using an electrical steering column lock system. Both methods are found to be applicable for hazard identification in an automotive context. It is also concluded that the induction with the failure modes method is less time consuming and easier to use than the method based on induction with generic low level hazards. Further, two proposals are presented to improve efficiency and consistency, reuse of generic hazards by component profiles and a domain specific catalogue of vehicle phases.
Technical Paper
2006-10-16
Dennis Selin, Helen Svensson, Petter Sundsten, Allan Wikström, Ulrik Eklund
Volvo Car Corporation has developed a Reference Architecture for PAG1 Infotainment Systems. A Reference Architecture is an architecture scoping over more than a single system, i.e. an architecture aimed for a family of systems. The Infotainment Reference Architecture has since 2001 been successfully applied for the PAG family which so far covers the infotainment systems of Volvo XC90, Volvo S40/V50, Jaguar XK, Aston Martin DB9 and the brand new Volvo S80. In 1999, the system design departments started up with the clear objective to develop a system solution aiming for the PAG infotainment system family. The work was carried out according to the established development process at Volvo Cars. A year later a discouraging design review was performed. The number of involved functions, the level of function interaction and the distribution of functionalities between ECUs resulted in a non-manageable system solution. These findings implied that large efforts late in integration phases would be needed and the problem was decided to be tackled upfront.
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