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Viewing 1 to 30 of 122
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Joshua L. Every, M. Kamel Salaani, Frank S. Barickman, Devin H. Elsasser, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger, Sughosh J. Rao
Dynamic Brake Support (DBS) is a safety system that has been applied to various passenger cars and has been shown to be effective at assisting drivers in avoiding or mitigating rear-end collisions. The objective of a DBS system is to ensure that the brake system is applied quickly and at sufficient pressure when a driver responds to a collision imminent situation. DBS is capable of improving braking response due to a passenger car driver's tendency to utilize multi-stage braking. Interest is developing in using DBS on commercial vehicles. In order to evaluate the possible improvement in safety that could be realized through the use of DBS, driver braking behavior must first be analyzed to confirm that improvement is possible and necessary. To determine if this is the case, a study of the response of truck drivers' braking behavior in collision imminent situations is conducted. This paper presents the method of evaluation and results. Data was drawn from a prior NHTSA simulator study and showed that many drivers exhibited multi-stage braking during four different imminent crash scenarios.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shreesha Y. Rao, JongYun Jeong, Ryan M. Ashby, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther
Abstract A Software-in-the-Loop (SIL) simulation is presented here wherein control algorithms for the Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) and Roll Stability Control (RSC) system were developed in Simulink. Vehicle dynamics models of a 6×4 cab-over tractor and two trailer combinations were developed in TruckSim and were used for control system design. Model validation was performed by doing various dynamic maneuvers like J-Turn, double lane change, decreasing radius curve, high dynamic steer input and constant radius test with increasing speed and comparing the vehicle responses obtained from TruckSim against field test data. A commercial ESC ECU contains two modules: Roll Stability Control (RSC) and Yaw Stability Control (YSC). In this research, only the RSC has been modeled. The ABS system was developed based on the results obtained from a HIL setup that was developed as a part of this research. The RSC system was developed after a careful study of the field test data obtained from the vehicle manufacturer in which the ESC was activated.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Joshua L. Every, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther, Anmol S. Sidhu, Dale A. Andreatta, Ronald A. Bixel
The (Vehicle Inertia Parameter Evaluation Rig) VIPER II is a full vehicle mass and inertia parameter measurement machine. The VIPER II expands upon the capabilities of its predecessor and is capable of measuring vehicles with a mass of up to 45,360 kg (100,000 lb), an increase in capacity of 18,100 kg (40,000 lb). The VIPER II also exceeds its predecessor in both the length and width of vehicles it can measure. The VIPER II's maximum vehicle width is 381 cm (150 in) an increase of 76 cm (30 in) and maximum distance from the vehicle CG to the outer most axle is 648 cm (255 in) an additional 152 cm (60 in) The VIPER II is capable of performing measurements including vehicle CG height, pitch, roll, and yaw moments of inertia and the roll/yaw cross product of inertia. While being able to measure both heavier and larger vehicles, the VIPER II is designed to maintain a maximum error of 3% for all inertia measurements and 1% for CG height. When designing a system with increased capacity there are many different factors and properties that must be considered.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ryan M. Ashby, JongYun Jeong, Shreesha Y. Rao, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther
This research was to model a 6×4 tractor-trailer rig using TruckSim and simulate severe braking maneuvers with hardware in the loop and software in the loop simulations. For the hardware in the loop simulation (HIL), the tractor model was integrated with a 4s4m anti-lock braking system (ABS) and straight line braking tests were conducted. In developing the model, over 100 vehicle parameters were acquired from a real production tractor and entered into TruckSim. For the HIL simulation, the hardware consisted of a 4s4m ABS braking system with six brake chambers, four modulators, a treadle and an electronic control unit (ECU). A dSPACE simulator was used as the “interface” between the TruckSim computer model and the hardware.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Sughosh J. Rao, Mohamed Kamel Salaani, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther, W. Riley Garrott
According to NHTSA's 2011 Traffic Safety Facts [1], passenger vehicle occupant fatalities continued the strong decline that has been occurring recently. In 2011, there were 21,253 passenger vehicles fatalities compared to 22,273 in 2010, and that was a 4.6% decrease. However; large-truck occupant fatalities increased from 530 in 2010 to 635 in 2011, which is a 20% increase. This was a second consecutive year in which large truck fatalities have increased (9% increase from 2009 to 2010). There was also a 15% increase in large truck occupant injuries from 2010. Moreover, the fatal crashes involving large trucks increased by 1.9%, in contrast to other-vehicle-occupant fatalities that declined by 3.6% from 2010. The 2010 accident statistics NHTSA's report reveals that large trucks have a fatal accident involvement rate of 1.22 vehicles per 100 million vehicle miles traveled compared to 1.53 for light trucks and 1.18 for passenger cars. This translates to a fatal accident involvement rate of 32.35 vehicles per 100,000 registered large trucks compared to 17.02 for light trucks and 13.09 for passenger cars.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Sughosh J. Rao, Mohamed Kamel Salaani, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther, Frank Barickman
The tractor trailer models discussed in this paper were for a real-time hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation to test heavy truck electronic stability control (ESC) systems [1]. The accuracy of the simulation results relies on the fidelity and accuracy of the vehicle parameters used. However in this case where hardware components are part of the simulation, their accuracy also affects the proper working of the simulation and ESC unit. Hence both the software and hardware components have to be validated. The validation process discussed in this paper is divided into two sections. The first section deals with the validation of the TruckSim vehicle model, where experimental data is compared with simulation results from TruckSim. Once the vehicle models are validated, they are incorporated in the HIL simulation and the second section discusses the validation of the whole HIL system with ESC. It is shown that the HIL simulation is able to predict the vehicle responses with a high degree of correlation even for limit dynamic maneuvers.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Scott Zagorski, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger
This paper presents a feedback linearization control technique as applied to a Roll Simulator. The purpose of the Roll Simulator is to reproduce in-field rollovers of ROVs and study occupant kinematics in a laboratory setting. For a system with known parameters, non-linear dynamics and trajectories, the feedback linearization algorithm cancels out the non-linearities such that the closed-loop dynamics behave in a linear fashion. The control inputs are computed values that are needed to attain certain desired motions. The computed values are a form of inverse dynamics or feed-forward calculation. With increasing system eigenvalue, the controller exhibits greater response time. This, however, puts a greater demand on the translational actuator. The controller also demonstrates that it is able to compensate for and reject a disturbance in force level. The feedback linearization controller demonstrates that with the limitation of the current actuators and track length removed, the simulator could reproduce the motions for an entire rollover maneuver.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Steven J. Yoder, Douglas R. Morr, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther
This paper presents the results of an in-depth study of the measurement of occupant kinematic response on the S-E-A Roll Simulator. This roll simulator was built to provide an accurate and repeatable test procedure for the evaluation of occupant protection and restraint systems during roll events within a variety of occupant compartments. In the present work this roll simulator was utilized for minimum-energy, or threshold type, rollover events of recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs). Input profiles for these tests were obtained through a separate study involving autonomous full vehicle tests [1]. During simulated roll events anthropomorphic test device (ATD) responses were measured using on-board high speed video, an optical three-dimensional motion capture system (OCMS) and an array of string potentiometers. Comparisons among the indirect measurement systems were performed to allow for characterization of each measurement system's utility and accuracy when used in this specific application.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Kyle A. Ott, John F. Wiechel, Dennis A. Guenther, Jason Stammen, Ann E. Mallory
Objectives. Examination of head injuries in the Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS) indicates that many pedestrian head injuries are induced by a combination of head translation and rotation. The Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon) is a computer algorithm that calculates both translational and rotational motion parameters relatable head injury. The objective of this study is to examine how effectively HIC and three SIMon correlates predict the presence of either their associated head injury or any serious head injury in pedestrian collisions. Methods. Ten reconstructions of actual pedestrian crashes documented by the PCDS were conducted using a combination of MADYMO simulations and experimental headform impacts. Linear accelerations of the head corresponding to a nine-accelerometer array were calculated within the MADYMO model's head simulation. Injury risk calculated by SIMon (relative motion damage measure RMDM, cumulative strain damage measure CSDM, dilatation damage measure DDM) and HIC were compared to the presence or absence of either their associated injury or any serious head injury in each case using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.
Technical Paper
2010-10-05
Jiantao Deng, Ashley L. Dunn, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger
This research focuses on the development and performance of analytical models to simulate a tractor-semitrailer in straight-ahead braking. The simulations were modified and tuned to simulate full-treadle braking with all brakes functioning correctly, as well as the behavior of the tractor-semitrailer rig under full braking with selected brakes disabled. The models were constructed in TruckSim and based on a tractor-semitrailer used in dry braking performance testing. The full-scale vehicle braking research was designed to define limits for engineering estimates on stopping distance when Class 8 air-braked vehicles experience partial degradation of the foundation brake system. In the full scale testing, stops were conducted from 30 mph and 60 mph, with the combination loaded to 80,000 lbs (gross combined weight or GCW), half payload, and with the tractor-semitrailer unladen (lightly loaded vehicle weight, or LLVW). Simulation outputs, including stopping distances, longitudinal acceleration, brake pressures, vehicle speeds, and longitudinal wheel slips are compared with the experimental tractor-semitrailer test data.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Santhosh Chandrasekharan, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger, Mohamed Kamel Salaani, Scott Bradley Zagorski, Paul A. Grygier
In 2007, a software model of a Roll Stability Control (RSC) system was developed based on test data for a Volvo tractor at NHTSA's Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC). This model was designed to simulate the RSC performance of a commercially available Electronic Stability Control (ESC) system. The RSC model was developed in Simulink and integrated with the available braking model (TruckSim) for the truck. The Simulink models were run in parallel with the vehicle dynamics model of a truck in TruckSim. The complete vehicle model including the RSC system model is used to simulate the behavior of the actual truck and determine the capability of the RSC system in preventing rollovers under different conditions. Several simulations were performed to study the behavior of the model developed and to compare its performance with that of an actual test vehicle equipped with RSC. Maneuvers that are highly difficult to execute on test tracks due to safety concerns and space limitations were simulated using the vehicle model.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Patrick J. Mcnaull, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger, Paul A. Grygier, Mohamed Kamel Salaani
Validation was performed on an existing heavy truck vehicle dynamics computer model with roll stability control (RSC). The first stage in this validation was to compare the response of the simulated tractor to that of the experimental tractor. By looking at the steady-state gains of the tractor, adjustments were made to the model to more closely match the experimental results. These adjustments included suspension and steering compliances, as well as auxiliary roll moment modifications. Once the validation of the truck tractor was completed for the current configuration, the existing 53-foot box trailer model was added to the vehicle model. The next stage in experimental validation for the current tractor-trailer model was to incorporate suspension compliances and modify the auxiliary roll stiffness to more closely model the experimental response of the vehicle. The final validation stage was to implement some minor modifications to the existing RSC model. Following the steady-state validation of the current model, the dynamic response of the vehicle was tested using a ramp steer maneuver.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Ronald A. Bixel, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther
This paper is a printed listing of public domain vehicle center-of-gravity (CG) location measurements conducted on behalf of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). This paper is an extension of the 1999 SAE paper titled “Measured Vehicle Inertia Parameters - NHTSA's Data Through November 1998” ( 1 ). The previous paper contained data for 496 vehicles. This paper includes data for 528 additional vehicles tested as part of NHTSA's New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) for year 2001 through year 2008 ( 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 ). The previous data included center-of-gravity location and mass moments-of-inertia for nearly all of the entries. The NCAP involves only the CG location measurements; so the vehicles listed in this paper do not have inertia data. This paper provides a brief discussion of the entries provided in the tabular listings as well as the accuracy of CG height measurements.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Patrick J. Mcnaull, Mohamed Kamel Salaani, Dennis A. Guenther, Paul A. Grygier, Gary J. Heydinger
Torsional stiffness properties were developed for both a 53-foot box trailer and a 28-foot flatbed control trailer based on experimental measurements. In order to study the effect of torsional stiffness on the dynamics of a heavy truck vehicle dynamics computer model, static maneuvers were conducted comparing different torsional stiffness values to the original rigid vehicle model. Stiffness properties were first developed for a truck tractor model. It was found that the incorporation of a torsional stiffness model had only a minor effect on the overall tractor response for steady-state maneuvers up to 0.4 g lateral acceleration. The effect of torsional stiffness was also studied for the trailer portion of the existing model. By again simulating the vehicle response using varying values of torsional stiffness and comparing these responses with the original rigid model, it was found that the overall effect on vehicle response was minimal for both static and dynamic maneuvers up to 0.5 g lateral acceleration.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Fawzi P. Bayan, Anthony D. Cornetto, Ashley (Al) Dunn, C. Brian Tanner, Eric S. Sauer, Brian Boggess, Douglas R. Morr, Rickey L. Stansifer, Scott A. Noll, Grant J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther
Engine control units (ECUs) on heavy trucks have been capable of storing “last stop” or “hard stop” data for some years. These data provide useful information to accident reconstruction personnel. In past studies, these data have been analyzed and compared to higher-resolution on-vehicle data for several heavy trucks and several makes of passenger cars. Previous published studies have been quite helpful in understanding the limitations and/or anomalies associated with these data. This study was designed and executed to add to the technical understanding of heavy truck event data recorders (EDR), specifically data associated with a modern Cummins power plant ECU. Emergency “full-treadle” stops were performed at many combinations of load-speed-surface coefficient conditions. In addition, brake-in-curve tests were performed on wet Jennite for various conditions of disablement of the braking system. This study shows how the ECU data compares to higher-resolution data acquired by independent data acquisition computers and transducers.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
David A. Coovert, Gary J. Heydinger, Ronald A. Bixel, Dale Andreatta, Dennis A. Guenther, Anmol S. Sidhu, David R. Mikesell
This paper describes the design and implementation of the SEA, Ltd. Brake and Throttle Robot (BTR). Presented are the criteria used in the initial design and the development and testing of the BTR, as well as some test results achieved with the device. The BTR is designed for use in automobiles and light trucks. It is based on a servomotor driven ballscrew, which in turn operates either the brake or accelerator. It is easily portable from one vehicle to another and compact enough to fit even smaller vehicles. The BTR is light enough so as to have minimal effect on the measurement of vehicle parameters. The BTR is designed for use as a stand-alone unit or as part of a larger control system such as the Automated Test Driver (ATD) yet allows for the use of a test driver for safety, as well as test selection, initiation, and monitoring. Installation in a vehicle will be described, as well as electronic components that support the BTR. Operational modes and controls will be examined, followed by testing and results.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Nicholas J. Durisek, Kevan J. Granat, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther
Representative vehicle inertial characteristics are important parameters for the development of motor vehicles and the proper operation of on-board systems. The Vehicle Inertia Measurement Facility (VIMF) measures vehicle center of gravity location, principal moments of inertia, and the roll/yaw product of inertia. It is important to understand the VIMF’s accuracy and repeatability, as well as the underlying methodology and assumptions, when performing tests or using the results of the test. This study reports on a repeatability analysis performed at the lower and upper limits of the VIMF. Each test performed is a complete drive-on/drive-off test. The test sequence involves the repeatability evaluation of several different machine configurations. Ten complete tests are performed for each vehicle. To better address the possibility of measurement bias, the design and verification of a calibration fixture for inertial characteristics is presented.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Santhosh Chandrasekharan, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger, M. Kamel Salaani, Scott B. Zagorski
Heavy trucks are involved in many accidents every year and Electronic Stability Control (ESC) is viewed as a means to help mitigate this problem. ESC systems are designed to reduce the incidence of single vehicle loss of control, which might lead to rollover or jackknife. As the working details and control strategies of commercially available ESC systems are proprietary, a generic model of an ESC system that mimics the basic logical functionality of commercial systems was developed. This paper deals with the study of the working of a commercial ESC system equipped on an actual tractor trailer vehicle. The particular ESC system found on the test vehicle contained both roll stability control (RSC) and yaw stability control (YSC) features. This work focused on the development of a reliable RSC software model, and the integration of it into a full vehicle simulation (TruckSim) of a heavy truck.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Ashley (Al) Dunn, C. Brian Tanner, Douglas R. Morr, Fawzi Bayan, Scott Noll, Eric Sauer, Anthony Cornetto, Alan Pearlman, Brian Boggess, John F. Wiechel, Dennis A. Guenther
This research was performed using a designed experiment to evaluate the loss of dry surface braking performance and stability that could be associated with the disablement of specific brake positions on a tractor-semitrailer. The experiment was intended to supplement and update previous research by Heusser, Radlinski, Flick, and others. It also sought to establish reasonable limits for engineering estimates on stopping performance degradation attributable to partial or complete brake failure of individual S-cam air brakes on a class 8 truck. Stopping tests were conducted from 30 mph and 60 mph, with the combination loaded to GCW (80,000 lb.), half-payload, and with the flatbed semitrailer unladen. Both tractor and semitrailer were equipped with antilock brakes. Along with stopping distance, brake pressures, longitudinal acceleration, road wheel speed, and steering wheel position and effort were also recorded. Relative stopping performance levels were comparatively analyzed for the three load conditions and effective deceleration degradation was analyzed for the various combinations of active brakes.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Anmol Sidhu, Dennis A. Guenther, Ron A. Bixel, Gary J. Heydinger
Modern passenger cars are being equipped with advanced driver assistance systems such as lane departure warning, collision avoidance systems, adaptive cruise control, etc. Testing for operation and effectiveness of these warning systems involves interaction between vehicles. While dealing with multiple moving vehicles, obtaining discriminatory results is difficult due to the difficulty in minimizing variations in vehicle separation and other parameters. This paper describes test strategies involving an automated test driver interacting with another moving vehicle. The autonomous vehicle controls its state (including position and speed) with respect to the target vehicle. Choreographed maneuvers such as chasing and overtaking can be performed with high accuracy and repeatability that even professional drivers have difficulty achieving. The system is also demonstrated to be usable in crash testing.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Tejas Kinjawadekar, Neha Dixit, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther, Mohamed Kamel Salaani
The paper discusses the development of a vehicle dynamics model and model validation of the 2003 Ford Expedition in CarSim. The accuracy of results obtained from simulations depends on the realism of the model which in turn depends on the measured data used to define the model parameters. The paper describes the tests used to measure the vehicle data and also gives a detailed account of the methodology used to determine parameters for the CarSim Ford Expedition model. The vehicle model was validated by comparing simulation results with experimental testing. Bounce and Roll tests in CarSim were used to validate the suspension and steering kinematics and compliances. Field test data of the Sine with Dwell maneuver was used for the vehicle model validation. The paper also discusses the development of a functional electronic stability control system and its effect on vehicle handling response in the Sine with Dwell maneuver.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Sughosh J. Rao, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther, Mohamed Kamel Salaani
The paper discusses the development of a model of the 2003 Ford Expedition using ADAMS View and its validation with experimental data. The front and rear suspensions are independent double A-arm type suspensions modeled using rigid links and ideal joints. The suspension springs and shock absorbers are modeled as force elements. The plots comparing the experimental tests and the simulation results are shown in this paper. Quasi-static roll and bounce tests are used to validate the suspension characteristics of the model while the Sine with Dwell and Slowly Increasing Steer maneuvers are used to validate the vehicle handling and tire-road interaction characteristics of the model. This paper also details the incorporation of an ESC model, originally developed by Kinjawadekar et al. [2] for CarSim, with the ADAMS model. The ESC is modeled in Simulink and co-simulated with the ADAMS vehicle model. Plots validating the ESC model with experimental data are also included. Plots detailing the improvement in performance with the ESC are shown using the Sine with Dwell maneuver.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Grant J. Heydinger, Gregory D. Uhlenhake, Dennis A. Guenther, Ashley L. Dunn
Markings or observable anomalies on vehicle seat belt restraint systems can be classified into two categories: (1) Those caused by collision forces, or “loading marks” and (2) those created by noncollision situations, or “normal usage marks” [1]. A survey was conducted of both crash tested and non-crash tested vehicles in order to collect data on both categories of markings. This paper examines and analyzes the markings caused by both collision and noncollision load scenarios in order to illustrate and evaluate their unique differences as well as provide a general pattern of severity relative to different loading conditions.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Michael Arnett, Giorgio Rizzoni, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther, M. Kamel Salaani
This paper presents the implementation and performance of an electric all-wheel drive system on a series-parallel, through-the-road hybrid electric vehicle. Conventional methods of all-wheel drive do not provide a suitable solution for this type of vehicle as the powertrain lacks a mechanical link between the front and rear axles. Moreover, this unique architecture allows the vehicle to be propelled solely by the front, or the rear, wheels during typical operation. Thus, the algorithm presented here manages wheel slip by either the front, or rear wheels when engaging to provide all-wheel drive capability. necessary testing validates the robustness of this Extensive system.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
C. Brian Tanner, H. Fred Chen, Philip Cheng, Dennis A. Guenther
Many vehicle-to-pole impacts occur when a vehicle leaves the roadway due to oversteer and loss of control in a lateral steering maneuver. Such a loss of control typically results in the vehicle having a significant component of lateral sliding motion as it crosses the road edge, so that impacts with objects off of the roadway often occur to the side of the vehicle. The response of the vehicle to this impact depends on the characteristics of the impacted object, the characteristics of the vehicle in the impacted zone, and the speed and orientation of the vehicle. In situations where the suspension or other stiff portions of a vehicle contacts a wooden pole, it is not uncommon for the pole to fracture. When this occurs, reconstruction of the accident is complicated by the need to evaluate both the energy absorbed by the vehicle as well as the energy absorbed by the pole. In addition, stiffness characteristics for the vehicle suspension and its mounts are not typically available since most side impact testing involves staged impacts between the vehicle wheels.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Ashley L. Dunn, C. Brian Tanner, Rickey L. Stansifer, Sean A. Doyle, Dennis A. Guenther
Following many accidents, one of the involved vehicles is found with partial or total separation of one of its wheels. In many such cases, forensic evidence on the wheel, and/or on some surface struck by the wheel, provide direct evidence that the wheel separation resulted from the impact. However, in some cases such direct evidence is not as obvious or cannot be identified. In those cases, it is often asserted that before the accident occurred one of the involved vehicles might have undergone a sudden loss of control as a result of a spontaneous partial or total wheel separation. This paper examines the response of rear wheel drive vehicles when there is a failure involving a ball joint on the front suspension as the vehicle is traveling along a roadway. The design of the front suspension is analyzed to determine the expected effects of such failure on the wheel geometry and on the interaction between the tires and the pavement. Next some case studies of accidents involving wheel loss are examined.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Ashley L. (Al) Dunn, Gregory D. Uhlenhake, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger, Grant J. Heydinger
Typical factors that contribute to the coast down characteristics of a vehicle include aerodynamic drag, gravitational forces due to slope, pumping losses within the engine, frictional losses throughout the powertrain, and tire rolling resistance. When summed together, these reactions yield predictable deceleration values that can be related to vehicle speeds. This paper focuses on vehicle decelerations while coasting with a typical medium-sized SUV. Drag factors can be classified into two categories: (1) those that are caused by environmental factors (wind and slope) and (2) those that are caused by the vehicle (powertrain losses, rolling resistance, and drag into stationary air). The purpose of this paper is to provide data that will help engineers understand and model vehicle response after loss of engine power.
Technical Paper
2007-08-05
David R. Mikesell, Anmol S. Sidhu, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger, Ronald A. Bixel
Automating road vehicle control can increase the range and reliability of dynamic testing. Some tests, for instance, specify precise steering inputs which human test drivers are only able to approximate, adding uncertainty to the test results. An automated steering system has been developed which is capable of removing these limitations. This system enables any production car or light truck to follow a user-defined path, using global position feedback, or to perform specific steering sequences with excellent repeatability. The system adapts itself to a given vehicle s handling characteristics, and it can be installed and uninstalled quickly without damage or permanent modification to the vehicle.
Technical Paper
2007-04-16
Benjamin J. Wright, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther
The Buckeye Bullet set domestic as well as international speed records for electric vehicles in 2004. The next generation of land speed vehicle from Ohio State called the Buckeye Bullet 2 (henceforth the BB2) will again challenge and hopefully achieve several new speed records. The Buckeye Bullet suspension worked relatively well but was found to not be quite optimal for the vehicle. The purpose of the work outlined here was to develop a new front and rear suspension for the BB2 that would be an improvement over the suspension of the original Bullet. Previous to the start of this work part of the suspension had already been designed in the form of an upright/control arm setup. This paper works on taking the suspension to completion from this point of design. Work done includes developing the final design, determining suspension parameters, building an ADAMS model, and testing the ADAMS model. The end result of this work will be a fully developed and computer tested front and rear suspension that the BB2 team can fabricate and install on the car.
Technical Paper
2007-04-16
Matthew L. Shurtz, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger, Scott B. Zagorski
In 2004, a model of a 6s6m ABS controller was developed in order to support NHTSA's efforts in the study of heavy truck braking performance. This model was developed using Simulink and interfaced with TruckSim, a vehicle dynamics software package, in order to create an accurate braking simulation of a 6×4 Peterbilt straight truck. For this study, the vehicle model braking dynamics were improved and the ABS controller model was refined. Also, the controller was made adaptable to ABS configurations other than 6s6m, such as 4s4m and 4s3m. Controller models were finally validated to experimental data from the Peterbilt truck, gathered at NHTSA's Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC).
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