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2014-02-05
Standard
J2973_201402
This SAE recommended practice specifies a standard geometry leak channel to set the leak threshold and compare results from a variety of leak test technologies and test conditions. This practice applies to fuel system assemblies and components which have a risk of allowing regulated fuel or fuel vapors to continuously escape to atmosphere. A component or assembly tested to this standard has a zero HC leakage threshold because the selected leak channel (Equivalent Channel) will self-plug and will not emit measurable hydrocarbon liquid or vapors. Therefore this standard eliminates leaks as a source of evaporative emission. This practice was primarily developed for pressurized and non-pressurized fuel systems and components containing liquid hydrocarbon based fuels.
2013-05-28
Standard
J2027_201305
This SAE Standard includes performance requirements for protective covers for flexible, non-metallic fuel tubing. Ultimate performance of the protective cover may be dependent on the interaction of the fuel tubing and protective cover. Therefore, it is recommended that tubing and cover combinations be tested as an assembly, where appropriate, to qualify to this document.
2013-05-14
Standard
J1747_201305
This SAE Information Report is intended to convey the test methods developed for use in testing with methanol and gasoline blends. Corrosion testing of metals has a long and varied history. In spite of the problems inherent in extrapolating results of accelerated tests on standard specimens to actual field durability, engineers have been able, to a large extent, to rely on these results in making materials selection decisions. However, these tests have generally employed aqueous media and are not strictly applicable to the use of organic chemical media. With methanol-gasoline fuel blends and their high electrical conductivity relative to gasoline, the relevance of the historical database is lost. Therefore, to allow rapid build-up of a new database, several corrosion test procedures have been reviewed and amended where appropriate.
2013-05-14
Standard
J1737_201305
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for the determination of the losses of hydrocarbon fluids, by permeation through component walls as well as through 'microleaks' at interfaces of assembled components while controlling temperature and pressure independently of each other. This is achieved in a recirculating system in which liquids which are transported through walls and joints are collected by a controlled flow of nitrogen (dry) and adsorbed by activated charcoal.
2012-11-01
Standard
J398_201211
This SAE Recommended Practice defines conditions for evaluating the compatibility of vehicle fuel tanks and filler pipes with fuel dispensing facilities equipped with standard (non-vapor recovery) configuration as well as vapor recovery type nozzles. It applies to passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, and light-duty trucks 4536 kg (10,000 lb) maximum GVW. It includes a technique for filling a tank full that can be used to establish a reference condition for other tests which require starting with a full tank.
2012-11-01
Standard
J2045_201211
This SAE Standard encompasses the recommended minimum requirements for non-metallic tubing and/or combinations of metallic tubing to non-metallic tubing assemblies manufactured as liquid- and/or vapor-carrying systems designed for use in gasoline, alcohol blends with gasoline, or diesel fuel systems. This SAE Standard is intended to cover tubing assemblies for any portion of a fuel system which operates above –40 °C (–40 °F) and below 115 °C (239 °F), and up to a maximum working gage pressure of 690 kPa (100 psig). The peak intermittent temperature is 115 °C (239 °F). For long-term continuous usage, the temperature shall not exceed 90 °C (194 °F). It should be noted that temperature extremes can affect assemblies in various manners and every effort must be made to determine the operating temperature to which a specific fuel line assembly will be exposed, and design accordingly. The applicable SAE standards should be referenced when designing liquid-carrying and/or vapor-carrying systems which are described in this document.
2012-08-14
Standard
J2599_201208
This SAE Recommended Practice covers design and evaluation of the entire gasoline filler pipe assembly used on cars and light trucks with respect to compliance with CARB (California Air Resources Board) LEV II (meeting or exceeding EPA Tier 2 and EU Stage-5 evaporative emissions requirements). It is limited to an assembly which is joined to the fuel tank using either a hose, Quick Connect Coupling, or a grommet type sealing device. The Design Practice covers the filler cap, filler pipe, filler pipe assembly to tank hose, and filler pipe assembly to tank grommet or spud. It includes recommendations for design of components and assemblies intended to perform successfully in evaporative emission SHED (Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination) tests, based on best practices known at the time of release.
2012-08-06
Standard
J1140_201208
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
2012-07-30
Standard
J2659_201207
This test method described in this document covers a procedure to speciate that is, to determine the amounts of each different fuel constituent that permeates across sheets, films or slabs of plastic materials. One side of the sheet is meant to be in contact with either a liquid test fuel or a saturated test fuel vapor, the other side is meant to be exposed to an environment free of fuel. The test fuel can either be a mixture of a small (usually smaller than ten) number of hydrocarbon, alcohol and ether constituents or it can be a sample of a real automotive fuel, e.g., one that may contain hundreds of different constituents. Furthermore, Appendix A contains guidelines to speciate evaporative emissions from finished fuel system components such as fuel lines, fuel filler pipes, fuel sender units, connectors and valves.
2012-06-29
Standard
J829_201206
This SAE Standard was developed primarily for passenger car and truck applications for the sizes indicated, but it may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications.
2012-05-31
Standard
J2785_201205
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed to standardize fuel inlet closure colors and verbiage by fuel type primarily for passenger car and truck applications, but it can be applied to marine, industrial, lawn and garden, and other similar applications. See Section 4, Table 1 for a list of specified colors, and text by fuel type.
2012-05-31
Standard
J285_201205
This SAE recommended practice provided standard dimensions for liquid fuel dispenser nozzle spouts and a system for differentiating between nozzels that dispense liquid fuel into vehicles with Spark Ignition (SI) Engines and compression Ignition (CI) Engines for land vehicles. Current legal definitions only distinguish between "UNLEADED Fuel" and "All Other Types of Fuel." These definitions are no longer valid. This document establishes a new set of definitions that have practical application to current automobile liquid fuel inlets and liquid fuel dispenser nozzle spouts.
2012-04-30
Standard
J1114_201204
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for passenger car and truck applications but it may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications.
2011-10-25
Standard
J1645_201110
This SAE Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice deals with electrostatic charge phenomena that may occur in automotive fuel systems and applies to the following: • Fuels that are in a liquid state at ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressures and are contained in vehicle fuel tanks that operate at or near atmospheric pressure. This includes gasoline and diesel fuels as well as their blends with additives such as alcohols, esters and ethers whether the additives are petroleum based or bio-fuel based. • The group of components that comprise the fuel system (in contact and not in contact with fuels). • Other components in proximity to the fuel system that may be affected by electrostatic fields caused by the fuel system. • Electrostatic phenomena that arise from or are affected by the following aspects of vehicle or fuel system operation: o Flowing fuel in the fuel delivery system o Flowing fuel being dispensed to the vehicle while it is being fueled
2011-03-31
WIP Standard
J2665
This test standard covers the procedure for measuring the permeation of fuel or fuel surrogates through test samples of elastomeric, plastic or composite materials, up to about 3 mm thick. The method involves filling a test cup with the test fluid (fuel or fuel surrogate), sealing test sample over the open end of the cup, and then placing the sealed container into an oven at the desired test temperature and measuring the weight loss over time. Permeation rates are calculated from the rate of weight loss and the exposed area of the test sample. Standard permeation test temperatures are 40 °C and 60 °C. Standard test fluids are Fuel C, Fuel CE10 and Fuel CM15. Other fluids, such as Fuel CMTBE15, and other volatile liquids may be tested according to this procedure as desired (SAE J1681). The method is not applicable for measuring permeation of higher boiling materials that will not completely evaporate from the exterior surface of the sample at the test temperature.
2011-01-25
WIP Standard
J2044
This SAE Recommended Practice defines the minimum functional requirements for quick connect couplings used for supply, return, and vapor/emission fuel system connections. This document also defines standard male tube end form dimensions, so as to guarantee interchangeability between all connector designs of the same male tube end form size. This document applies to automotive and light truck applications under the following conditions: a. Gasoline and diesel fuel delivery systems or their vapor venting or evaporative emission control systems; b. Operating pressure up to 500 kPa, 5 bar, (72 psig); c. Operating vacuum down to -50 kPa, -0.5 bar (-7.2 psi); d. Operating temperatures from -40 °C (-40 °F) to 115 °C (239 °F). Quick connect couplings function by joining the connector to a mating tube end form, then pulling back to assure a complete connection. The requirements stated in this document apply to new connectors in assembly operations unless otherwise indicated. For service operations, the mating tube should be lubricated with SAE 30-weight oil before re-connecting.
2010-06-16
Standard
J2663_201006
This test method is intended for measuring fuel permeation at elevated temperature through low permeating hose or tubing samples of elastomeric or composit construction. The expected accuracy of the method is about +/- 10% of the sample permeation rate.
2010-04-19
WIP Standard
J2587
This practice describes recommended performance requirements of fuel tank closures used in conjunction with fuel level senders and fuel delivery systems. It provides guidelines that assure interchangeability and compatibility between fuel tanks and fuel pump/sender closure systems without specifying a specific closure system design. These systems may be used in rigid fuel tank systems made of plastic or metal. Complete details of specific designs shall be established by mutual agreement between customer and supplier. The dimensions and performance requirements are selected to optimize a. The closure system, durability and reliability with respect to - Vehicle SHED measurements - Fuel system / crash integrity - LEV - II useful life b. Assembly and service ease and reliability c. Packaging of fuel tanks and their sending units d. Interchangeability of sender closures between various fuel tank designs
2009-08-13
Standard
J2044_200908
This SAE Recommended Practice defines standard tube end form dimensions so as to guarantee interchangeability between all connector designs of the same size and the standard end form. This document also defines the minimum functional requirements for quick connect couplings between flexible tubing or hose and rigid tubing or tubular fittings used in supply, return, and vapor/emissions in fuel systems. This document applies to automotive and light truck applications under the following conditions: a. Gasoline and diesel fuel delivery systems or their vapor venting or evaporative emission control systems. b. Operating pressure up to 500 kPa, 5 bar, (72 psig). c. Operating vacuum down to -50 kPa, -0.5 bar (-7.2 psi). d. Operating temperatures from -40 °C (Ð40 °F) to 115 °C (239 °F). Quick connect couplings function by joining the connector to a mating tube end form then pulling back to assure a complete connection. The requirements stated in this document apply to new connectors in assembly operations unless otherwise indicated.
2009-06-03
WIP Standard
J2903
The standard will cover several design characteristics and testing procedures that are important in establishing base architectural designs that can be applied across the industry. The testing procedures will address tests that are time consuming and/or expensive. It will not cover aspects of design or testing that are customized for individual applications.
2008-08-11
Standard
J2744_200808
This document presents the requirements for a build-in service port to be used in vehicles intended to comply with Enhanced Evaporative Emission Requirements. The primary function of the Service Port (Valve Assembly-Evaporative Emission Canister Purge Harness Service) is to provide non-destructive access to the evaporative emissions system to enable testing of the integrity of the system. The Service Port is used to introduce air pressure or fuel vapors into, or evacuate them out of, the system. This access may be used for the following evaluations: Evaporative System Certifications Canister Loading and Pumping End-of-line Testing System Integrity Service (e.g. OBD MIL on) Leak Location and Repair Verification In-Use Compliance Testing Canister Loading and Purging Inspection/Maintenance Testing System Integrity and Purge Check
2008-06-26
WIP Standard
J2852
Drop testing and "sled" testing are used regularly to demonstrate integrity of plastic fuel systems. This document defines test method, application and rationale for fuel tank impact testing.
2008-05-07
WIP Standard
J1681
This SAE Recommended Practice presents recommendations for test fluids that can be used to simulate real world fuels. The use of standardized test fluids is required in order to limit the variability found in commercial fuels and fluids. Commercial fuels can vary substantially between manufacturers, batches, seasons, and geographic location. Further, standardized test fluids are universally available and will promote consistent test results for materials testing. Therefore, this document: a. Explains commercial automotive fuel components b. Defines standardized components of materials test fluids c. Defines a nomenclature for test fluids d. Describes preparations for test fluids and e. Recommends fluids for testing fuel system materials The test fluid compositions specified in Section 7 of this document are recommended solely for evaluating materials. They are not intended for other activities, such as engine development, design verification, or process validation unless agreed upon by the contracting parties.
2008-04-22
WIP Standard
J2260
This SAE Standard presents the minimum requirements for nonmetallic tubing with one or more layers manufactured for use as liquid-carrying or vapor-carrying component in fuel systems for gasoline, or alcohol blends with gasoline. Requirements in this document also apply to monowall tubing (one layer construction). When the construction has one or more layers of polymer-based compounds in the wall, the multilayer constructions are primarily for the purpose of improvement in permeation resistance to hydrocarbons found in various fuels. The tube construction can have a straight-wall configuration, a wall that is convoluted or corrugated, or a combination of each. It may have an innermost layer with improved electrical conductivity for use where such a characteristic is desired. The improved electrical conductivity can apply to the entire wall construction, if the tubing is a monowall. (For elastomeric based MLT constructions, refer to SAE J30 and SAE J2405). Unless otherwise agreed to by suppliers and users this document applies to tubing for any portion of the fuel system that might operate continuously at temperatures above -40 °C and below 90 °C and up to a maximum working gage pressure of 450kPa.
2007-09-27
Standard
J1748_200709
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to determining worst-case fuel, conditioning test specimens in worst-case fuel(s) prior to testing, individual tests for properties of polymers exposed to methanol-gasoline fuel mixtures. The determination of equilibrium, as well as typical calculations are also covered. Polymers are used in applications which require exposure to a variety of fluid environments. Tests to determine the effects of such exposure on material properties are well established. However, the determination of the effects on polymers exposed to fuels of variable alcohol and ether content poses new problems. This document seeks to address those concerns by detailing changes to standard tests that make them suitable for that purpose.
2007-07-20
Standard
J1747_200707
This SAE Information Report is intended to convey the test methods developed for use in testing with methanol and gasoline blends. Corrosion testing of metals has a long and varied history. In spite of the problems inherent in extrapolating results of accelerated tests on standard specimens to actual field durability, engineers have been able, to a large extent, to rely on these results in making materials selection decisions. However, these tests have generally employed aqueous media and are not strictly applicable to the use of organic chemical media. With methanol-gasoline fuel blends and their high electrical conductivity relative to gasoline, the relevance of the historical database is lost. Therefore, to allow rapid build-up of a new database, several corrosion test procedures have been reviewed and amended where appropriate.
2007-04-23
Standard
J285_200704
This SAE recommended practice provided standard dimensions for liquid fuel dispenser nozzle spouts and a system for differentiating between nozzels that dispense liquid fuel into vehicles with Spark Ignition (SI) Engines and compression Ignition (CI) Engines for land vehicles. Current legal definitions only distinguish between "UNLEADED Fuel" and "All Other Types of Fuel." These definitions are no longer valid. This document establishes a new set of definitions that have practical application to current automobile liquid fuel inlets and liquid fuel dispenser nozzle spouts.
2006-11-06
Standard
J2785_200611
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed to standardize fuel inlet closure colors and verbiage by fuel type primarily for passenger car and truck applications, but it can be applied to marine, industrial, lawn and garden, and other similar applications. See Section 4, Table 1 for a list of specified colors, and text by fuel type.
2006-10-13
Standard
J2665_200610
This test standard covers the procedure for measuring the permeation of fuel or fuel surrogates through test samples of elastomeric, plastic or composite materials, up to about 3 mm thick. The method involves filing a test cup with the test fluid (fuel or fuel surrogate), sealing test sample over the open end of the cup, and then placing the sealed container into an oven at the desired test temperature and measuring the weight loss over time. Permeation rates are calculated from the rate of weight loss and the exposed area of the test sample. Standard permeation test temperatures are 40 C and 60C. Standard test fluids are Fuel C, Fuel CE10 and Fuel CM15. Other fluids, such as Fuel CMTBE15, and other volatile liquids may be tested accordingly to this procedure as desired (SAE J1681). The method is not applicable for measuring permeation of higher boiling materials that will not completely evaporate from the exterior surface of the sample at the test temperature.
2006-08-16
Standard
J1645_200608
This SAE Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice deals with electrostatic charge phenomena that may occur in automotive fuel systems. This document applies to the following: - Fuels that are liquid at global ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressures and are handled by vehicle fuel tanks that operate at pressures near atmospheric pressure. - The group of components that comprise the fuel system and those portions of the vehicle adjacent to the fuel system. - Electrostatic phenomena that arise from the following circumstances of vehicle or fuel system operation: a. Flowing fuel in the fuel delivery system b. Flowing fuel being dispensed to the vehicle while it it being fueled This recommended practice provides for materials, components and subsystems that can be robust to electrostatic charge pheonomena within the fuel system. The individual vehicle OEM should have responsibility for design requirements that apply to the entire fuel system and at the vehicle level. This document can provide guideance for how the OEM's might proceed.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 73