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Viewing 1 to 30 of 72
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Matthew P. Reed
Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 213 specifies a bench seat that is used in dynamic testing of child restraint systems. To assess the representativeness of the FMVSS 213 bench, data from 54 passenger cars, minivans, and SUVs were analyzed to quantify the side-view profile of the seat centerlines in second-row, outboard seats. SAE J826 H-point measurements were performed on all seats and on the FMVSS 213 bench. A landmark-based resampling method was used to obtain a meaningful average seat contour after aligning on H-point. Principal component analysis and regression were conducted to quantify the effects of seat cushion angle, cushion length, and back angle on the seat profile. When aligned on H-point, the cushion length and surface angles of the FMVSS 213 bench were similar to the mean contour, except that no seats were as flat as the bench profile. However, the FMVSS 213 bench was softer than 93 percent of the vehicle seats, as measured by the depth of penetration of the H-point machine.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Diana M. Wegner, Matthew P. Reed
Digital human models (DHM) are now widely used to assess worker tasks as part of manufacturing simulation. With current DHM software, the simulation engineer or ergonomist usually makes a manual estimate of the likely worker standing location with respect to the work task. In a small number of cases, the worker standing location is determined through physical testing with one or a few workers. Motion capture technology is sometimes used to aid in quantitative analysis of the resulting posture. Previous research has demonstrated the sensitivity of work task assessment using DHM to the accuracy of the posture prediction. This paper expands on that work by demonstrating the need for a method and model to accurately predict worker standing location. The effect of standing location on work task posture and the resulting assessment is documented through three case studies using the Siemens Jack DHM software. The paper concludes with recommendation for the development of a method and model that considers task biomechanics for accurate prediction of standing location when performing work task assessments during the design phase of a new vehicle program.
Technical Paper
2009-11-02
Chia-Yuan Chang, Jonathan D. Rupp, Matthew P. Reed, Richard E. Hughes, Lawrence W. Schneider
In a previous study, the authors reported on the development of a finite-element model of the midsize male pelvis and lower extremities with lower-extremity musculature that was validated using PMHS knee-impact response data. Knee-impact simulations with this model were performed using forces from four muscles in the lower extremities associated with two-foot bracing reported in the literature to provide preliminary estimates of the effects of lower-extremity muscle activation on knee-thigh-hip injury potential in frontal impacts. The current study addresses a major limitation of these preliminary simulations by using the AnyBody three-dimensional musculoskeletal model to estimate muscle forces produced in 35 muscles in each lower extremity during emergency one-foot braking. To check the predictions of the AnyBody Model, activation levels of twelve major muscles in the hip and lower extremities were measured using surface EMG electrodes on 12 midsize-male subjects performing simulated maximum and 50% of maximum braking in a laboratory seating buck.
Technical Paper
2009-06-09
Matthew P. Reed
The Human Motion Simulation Framework (Framework) is a hierarchical set of algorithms for predicting and analyzing task-oriented human motion. The Framework was developed to improve the performance of commercial human modeling software by increasing the accuracy of predicted motions and the speed of generating simulations. This paper presents the addition of stair ascending and descending to the Transition Stepping and Timing (Transit) model, a component of the Framework that predicts gait and acyclic stepping.
Technical Paper
2009-06-09
Wei Zhou, Matthew P. Reed
The Human Motion Simulation Framework is a hierarchical set of algorithms for physical task simulation and analysis. The Framework is capable of simulating a wide range of tasks, including standing and seated reaches, walking and carrying objects, and vehicle ingress and egress. In this paper, model predictions for the terminal postures of standing object transfer tasks are compared to data from 20 subjects with a wide range of body dimensions. Whole body postures were recorded using optical motion capture for one-handed and two-handed object transfers to target destinations at three angles from straight ahead and three heights. The hand and foot locations from the data were input to the HUMOSIM Framework Reference Implementation (HFRI) in the Jack human modeling software. The whole-body postures predicted by the HFRI were compared to the measured postures using a set of measures selected for their importance to ergonomic analysis. The results demonstrate that the HUMOSIM Framework standing posture predictions agree well with motion capture data, with particularly high correlations observed for the important predictions of torso inclination and hand-to-shoulder distance.
Technical Paper
2009-06-09
Wei Zhou, Thomas J. Armstrong, Matthew P. Reed, Suzanne G. Hoffman, Diana M. Wegner
Efficient methods for simulating operators performing part handling tasks in manufacturing plants are needed. The simulation of part handling motions is an important step towards the implementation of virtual manufacturing for the purpose of improving worker productivity and reducing injuries in the workplace. However, industrial assembly tasks are often complex and involve multiple interactions between workers and their environment. The purpose of this paper is to present a series of industrial simulations using the Human Motion Simulation Framework developed at the University of Michigan. Three automotive assembly operations spanning scenarios, such as small and large parts, tool use, walking, re-grasping, reaching inside a vehicle, etc. were selected. A conceptual model for describing relationships among task objectives, the environment, parts and tools, as well as worker variability, work methods, motion patterns, and musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) risks is proposed as a structure for conducting the case studies.
Technical Paper
2009-04-20
Patrick Atkinson, Matthew McCann, Matthew P. Reed, Ajay Srivastava, Norman Walter
Contact between the knees and knee bolster commonly occurs in frontal collisions. The contact region on the bolster and the knee anatomy involved are related to the pre-crash positioning of the knees. The location of the distal (or infra-) patella was recorded on volunteers of widely varying stature after they had selected a comfortable driving position in mockups of three vehicles representing a large variation in size and shape: sedan, crossover SUV, and full-size pickup. On average, the right knees were grouped more tightly and were located more forward and lower than the left knees. On average, the knees were positioned 200 mm from the knee bolster for all subjects. The range of distance separating the distal patellae (within subject knee-to-knee distance) varied from 184–559 mm for all subjects for the three vehicles. Three adult Hybrid-III ATDs (small female, midsize male, large male) positioned in the test vehicles using the positioning protocol for crash testing (FMVSS 208) yielded positions that were reflective of the volunteers in two vehicles (sedan, pickup) in the fore-aft direction.
Technical Paper
2008-11-03
Jonathan D. Rupp, Carl S. Miller, Matthew P. Reed, Nathaniel H. Madura, Kathleen D. Klinich, Lawrence W. Schneider
Development and validation of crash test dummies and computational models that are capable of predicting the risk of injury to all parts of the knee-thigh-hip (KTH) complex in frontal impact requires knowledge of the force transmitted from the knee to the hip under knee impact loading. To provide this information, the knee impact responses of whole and segmented cadavers were measured over a wide range of knee loading conditions. These data were used to develop and help validate a computational model, which was used to estimate force transmitted to the cadaver hip. Approximately 250 tests were conducted using five unembalmed midsize male cadavers. In these tests, the knees were symmetrically impacted with a 255-kg padded impactor using three combinations of knee-impactor padding and velocity that spanned the range of knee loading conditions produced in FMVSS 208 and NCAP tests. Each subject was tested in four conditions. Following test of whole seated cadavers, the subjects were impacted after the connection between the thigh flesh and pelvis was cut, after the thigh flesh was removed, and after the torso was removed.
Technical Paper
2008-06-17
Matthew P. Reed, Stephanie Huang
The ease of getting into and out of passenger cars and light trucks is a critical component of customer acceptance and product differentiation. In commercial vehicles, the health and safety of drivers is affected by the design of the steps and handholds they use to get into and out of the cab. Ingress/egress assessment appears to represent a substantial application opportunity for digital human models. The complexity of the design space and the range of possible biomechanical and subjective measures of interest mean that developing useful empirical models is difficult, requiring large-scale subject testing with physical mockups. Yet, ingress and egress motions are complex and strongly affected by the geometric constraints and driver attributes, posing substantial challenges in creating meaningful simulations using figure models. Previous approaches to simulating ingress and egress have focused on the modification of stored motions from laboratory studies to achieve complex motion simulations.
Technical Paper
2008-06-17
Suzanne G. Hoffman, Matthew P. Reed, Don B. Chaffin
Posture and external loads such as hand forces have a dominant effect on ergonomic analysis outcomes. Yet, current digital human modeling tools used for proactive ergonomics analysis lack validated models for predicting postures for standing hand-force exertions. To address this need, the effects of hand magnitude and direction on whole-body posture for standing static hand-force exertion tasks were quantified in a motion-capture study of 19 men and women with widely varying body size. The objective of this work was to identify postural behaviors that might be incorporated into a posture-prediction algorithm for standing hand-force tasks. Analysis of one-handed exertions indicates that, when possible, people tend to align their bodies with the direction of force application, converting potential cross-body exertions into sagittal plane exertions. With respect to the hand-force plane, pelvis position is consistent with a postural objective of reducing rotational trunk torques. One-handed task postures are characterized by axial rotation of the torso towards or away from the point of force application.
Technical Paper
2007-06-12
David W. Wagner, Matthew P. Reed, John Rasmussen
Most current applications of digital human figure models for ergonomic assessments of manual tasks focus on the analysis of a static posture. Tools available for static analysis include joint-specific strength, calculation of joint moments, balance maintenance capability, and low-back compression or shear force estimates. Yet, for many tasks, the inertial loads due to acceleration of body segments or external objects may contribute significantly to internal body forces and tissue stresses. Due to the complexity of incorporating the dynamics of motion into analysis, most commercial software packages used for ergonomic assessment do not have the capacity to include dynamic effects. Thus, commercial human modeling packages rarely provide an opportunity for the user to determine if a static analysis is sufficient. The goal of this paper is to quantify the differences between a static and dynamic analysis of a materials handling task using the AnyBody modeling system to include the effects of motion.
Technical Paper
2007-06-12
Matthew P. Reed, David W. Wagner
Industrial tasks performed by standing workers are among those most commonly simulated using digital human models. Workers often walk, turn, and take acyclic steps as they perform these tasks. Current h uman modeling tools lack the capability to simulate these whole body motions accurately. Most models simulate walking by replaying joint angle trajectories corresponding to a general gait pattern. Turning is simulated poorly if at all, and violations of kinematic constraints between the feet and ground are common. Moreover, current models do not accurately predict foot placement with respect to loads and other hand targets, diminishing the utility of the associated ergonomic analyses. A new approach to simulating stepping and walking in task-oriented activities is proposed. Foot placements and motions are predicted from operator and task characteristics using empirical models derived from laboratory data and validated using field data from an auto assembly plant. The motions of the pelvis and torso are predicted from the foot placements, operator characteristics, and task requirements.
Technical Paper
2007-06-12
Matthew B. Parkinson, Matthew P. Reed
Standing reach envelopes are important tools for the design of industrial and vehicle environments. Previous work in this area has focussed on manikin-based (where a few manikins are used to simulate individuals reaching within the region of interest) and population-based (where data are gathered on many individuals reaching in a constrained environment) approaches. Each of these methods has merits and shortfalls. The current work bridges the manikin- and population-based approaches to assessing reach by creating population models using kinematic simulation techniques driven by anthropometric data. The approach takes into account body dimensions, balance, and postural cost to create continuous models that can be used to assess designs with respect to both maximal and submaximal reaches. Cost is quantified as the degree to which the torso is involved in the reach, since the inclination of the torso is a good measure of lower-back load and may be related to subjective reach difficulty. A simplified planar analysis is presented to illustrate the modeling approach.
Technical Paper
2007-06-12
Suzanne G. Hoffman, Matthew P. Reed, Don B. Chaffin
Accurate representation of working postures is critical for ergonomic assessments with digital human models because posture has a dominant effect on analysis outcomes. Most current digital human modeling tools require manual manipulation of the digital human to simulate force-exertion postures or rely on optimization procedures that have not been validated. Automated posture prediction based on human data would improve the accuracy and repeatability of analyses. The effects of hand force location, magnitude, and direction on whole-body posture for standing tasks were quantified in a motion-capture study of 20 men and women with widely varying body size. A statistical analysis demonstrated that postural variables critical for the assessment of body loads can be predicted from the characteristics of the worker and task.
Technical Paper
2007-04-16
Omer Tsimhoni, Matthew P. Reed
Digital human modeling has traditionally focused on the physical aspects of humans and the environments in which they operate. As the field moves towards modeling dynamic and more complex tasks, cognitive and perceptual aspects of the human's performance need to be considered. Cognitive modeling of complex tasks such as driving has commonly avoided the complexity of physical simulation of the human, distilling motor performance to motion execution times. To create a more powerful and flexible approach to the modeling of human/machine interaction, we have integrated a physical architecture of human motion (the Human Motion Simulation Ergonomics Framework—HUMOSIM) with a computational cognitive architecture (the Queueing network model human processor—QN–MHP). The new system combines the features of the two separate architectures and provides new capabilities that emerge from their integration.
Technical Paper
2006-11-06
Matthew P. Reed, Sheila M. Ebert-Hamilton, Miriam A. Manary, Kathleen D. Klinich, Lawrence W. Schneider
The outcomes of crash tests can be influenced by the initial posture and position of the anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) used to represent human occupants. In previous work, positioning procedures for ATDs representing adult drivers and rear-seat passengers have been developed through analysis of posture data from human volunteers. The present study applied the same methodology to the development of positioning procedures for ATDs representing six-year-old and ten-year-old children sitting on vehicle seats and belt-positioning boosters. Data from a recent study of 62 children with body mass from 18 to 45 kg were analyzed to quantify hip and head locations and pelvis and head angles for both sitter-selected and standardized postures. In the present study, the 6YO and 10YO Hybrid-III ATDs were installed using FMVSS 213 procedures in six test conditions used previously with children. Data were gathered on a vehicle seat with and without a backless belt-positioning booster at 19-, 23-, and 27-degree seat back angles.
Technical Paper
2006-07-04
Matthew B. Parkinson, Matthew P. Reed
A person's ability to perform a task is often limited by their ability to maintain balance. This is particularly true in lateral work performed in seated environments. For a truck driver operating the shift lever of a manual transmission, excessive shift forces can necessitate pulling on the steering wheel with the other hand to maintain balance, creating a potentially unsafe condition. An analysis of posture and balance in truck shifter operation was conducted using balance limits to define the acceptable range of shifter locations. The results are dependent on initial driver position, reach postures, and shoulder strength. The effects of shifter force direction and magnitude were explored to demonstrate the application of the analysis method. This methodology can readily be applied to other problems involving hand-force exertions in seated environments.
Technical Paper
2006-07-04
Matthew P. Reed, Julian Faraway, Don B. Chaffin, Bernard J. Martin
The potential of digital human modeling to improve the design of products and workspaces has been limited by the time-consuming manual manipulation of figures that is required to perform simulations. Moreover, the inaccuracies in posture and motion that result from manual procedures compromise the fidelity of the resulting analyses. This paper presents a new approach to the control of human figure models and the analysis of simulated tasks. The new methods are embodied in an algorithmic framework developed in the Human Motion Simulation (HUMOSIM) laboratory at the University of Michigan. The framework consists of an interconnected, hierarchical set of posture and motion modules that control aspects of human behavior, such as gaze or upper-extremity motion. Analysis modules, addressing issues such as shoulder stress and balance, are integrated into the framework. The framework encompasses many individual innovations in motion simulation algorithms, but the primary innovation is in the development of a comprehensive system for motion simulation and ergonomic analysis that is specifically designed to be independent of any particular human modeling system.
Technical Paper
2006-07-04
David W. Wagner, Matthew P. Reed, Don B. Chaffin
Cyclical stepping (gait) has been studied extensively. Some of these results are reflected in the straight and curved path step-following algorithms in commercial digital human modeling (DHM) implementations. With the aid of these algorithms, DHM users define start, intermediate, and end path points and the software generates a walking-like motion along the path. Most of these algorithms have substantial limitations, among them that the figures exhibit “foot skate,” meaning that the kinematic constraint of foot contact with the ground is not respected. Turning is accomplished by pivoting the entire figure, rather than through realistic lower-extremity motions. The simulation of the non-cyclical stepping motions accompanying manual material handling pickup and delivery tasks requires manual manikin manipulation. This paper proposes a paradigm for the simulation of stepping behavior in digital human models based on a model of foot placements and motions. Cyclical and non-cyclical transition stepping behaviors are handled with the same structure, allowing for smooth transitions between gait and non-cyclical behaviors.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
Stephanie Huang, Matthew P. Reed
Children who are too large for harness restraints but too small to obtain good restraint from a vehicle seatbelt alone should be seated in a belt-positioning booster. Boosters have been shown to significantly reduce abdominal injuries caused by seatbelts. This effectiveness may be due in part to the fact that boosters reduce the effective seat cushion length, allowing children to sit more comfortably without slouching. NHTSA recommends that children who do not use harness restraints use boosters until they are at least 145 cm tall. In this paper, data from several sources were combined to assess how well children fit on rear seat cushions. Data from NASS-GES were analyzed to determine the age distribution of rear-seat occupants. Anthropometric data from several sources were analyzed to determine the distribution of buttock-popliteal length, a measure of thigh length that is a key determinant of seat fit, as a function of age and gender. Second- and third-row cushion lengths were measured on a convenience sample of 56 late-model vehicles.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
Joshua S. Danker, Matthew P. Reed
A major limitation of ergonomic analyses with current digital human models (DHM) is the speed and accuracy with which they can simulate worker postures and motions. Ergonomic analysis capabilities of DHM would be significantly improved with the addition of a fast, deterministic, accurate movement simulation model for the upper extremities. This paper describes the development of an important component of such a model. Motion data from twelve men and women performing one-handed, push-button reaches in a heavy truck seat were analyzed to determine patterns of motion of the clavicle relative to the thorax. Target direction and reach distance were good predictors clavicle segment motion, particularly for fore-aft clavlcle motion.
Technical Paper
2006-04-03
Matthew B. Parkinson, Matthew P. Reed
Occupant packaging practice relies on statistical models codified in SAE practices, such as the SAE J941 eyellipse, and virtual human figure models representing individual occupants. The current packaging approach provides good solutions when the problem is relatively unconstrained, but achieving good results when many constraints are active, such as restricted headroom and sightlines, requires a more rigorous approach. Modeling driver needs using continuous models that retain the residual variance associated with performance and preference allows use of optimization methodologies developed for robust design. Together, these models and methods facilitate the consideration of multiple factors simultaneously and tradeoff studies can be performed. A case study involving the layout of the interior of a passenger car is presented, focusing on simultaneous placement of the seat and steering wheel adjustment ranges. Tradeoffs between adjustability, driver accommodation, and exterior vision are explored under this paradigm.
Technical Paper
2005-11-09
Matthew P. Reed, Sheila M. Ebert-Hamilton, Lawrence W. Schneider
The initial positioning of anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) can influence the outcomes of crash tests. Current procedures for positioning ATDs in rear seats are not based on systematic studies of passenger postures. This paper compares the postures of three side-impact ATDs to the postures of 24 men and women in three vehicle rear seats and 16 laboratory conditions. When positioned using current procedures, the locations of the ES-2 and SID-HIII ATD heads are generally rearward of those observed with similar-size passengers. The SID-IIs head locations matched the expected locations of heads of passengers of similar size more closely. As the seat back angle was increased, people reclined less than the ATDs. Based on these findings, a new ATD positioning procedure for rear seats was developed. The primary objective of the new procedure is to place the ATD head in the location that is most likely for people of similar size. Linear regression equations specify the fore-aft location of the ATD hips and head with respect to the seat H-point as a function of seat back angle (SAE A40) and seat cushion length.
Technical Paper
2005-06-14
Matthew P. Reed, Kristy Satchell, Aris Nichols
The development of a new carrier route vehicle for the U.S. Postal Service began with the design of the vehicle interior from an operator-centered perspective. A task analysis of the postal worker while driving and while performing mail-handling operations guided the layout of the vehicle interior. The Jack™ human modeling software was used, along with SAE Recommended Practices and other tools, to create a vehicle environment that will accommodate a large percentage of the operator population. The challenges of designing for this unique work environment provided a good opportunity to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of the available human factors tools, including the Jack™ digital human figure model. This paper describes the development of the vehicle interior, discusses some lessons learned, and concludes with recommendations for increased functionality and improved integration of vehicle interior design tools.
Technical Paper
2005-06-14
David W. Wagner, Matthew P. Reed, Don B. Chaffin
For many industrial tasks (push, pull, lift, carry, etc.), restrictions on grip locations and visibility constrain the hand and head positions and help to define feasible postures. In contrast, foot locations are often minimally constrained and an ergonomics analyst can choose several different stances in selecting a posture to analyze. Also, because stance can be a critical determinant of a biomechanical assessment of the work posture, the lack of a valid method for placing the feet of a manikin with respect to the task compromises the accuracy of the analysis. To address this issue, foot locations and orientations were captured in a laboratory study of sagittal plane and asymmetric manual load transfers. A pilot study with four volunteers of varying anthropometry approached a load located on one of three shelves and transferred the load to one of six shelves. The data illustrate foot placements and behaviors that depend on pickup heights, the use of one or two hands to grasp the object, and the participants' body dimensions.
Technical Paper
2005-06-14
John F. Lockett, Ernst Assmann, Rush Green, Matthew P. Reed, Ulrich Raschke, Jean-Pierre Verriest
This panel provided a forum for discussion of future research and development desired by users and potential users of DHM technologies. The discussion was based on the experiences of users from various sectors and industries. Panelists provided written statements and delivered short presentations prior to opening the session to audience discussion. The panel was designed to inform and drive research and development plans to fill these needs.
Technical Paper
2005-04-11
Matthew P. Reed, Sheila M. Ebert-Hamilton, Miriam A. Manary, Kathleen D. Klinich, Lawrence W. Schneider
This paper presents a laboratory study of body dimensions, seated posture, and seatbelt fit for children weighing from 40 to 100 lb (18 to 45 kg). Sixty-two boys and girls were measured in three vehicle seats with and without each of three belt-positioning boosters. In addition to standard anthropometric measurements, three-dimensional body landmark locations were recorded with a coordinate digitizer in sitter-selected and standardized postures. This new database quantifies the vehicle-seated postures of children and provides quantitative evidence of the effects of belt-positioning boosters on belt fit. The data will provide guidance for child restraint design, crash dummy development, and crash dummy positioning procedures.
Technical Paper
2005-04-11
Matthew P. Reed, Michael J. Flannagan
Turn signals mounted on exterior rearview mirrors are increasingly being used as original equipment on passenger cars and light trucks. The potential for mirror-mounted turn signals (MMTS) to improve the geometric visibility of turn signals is examined in this paper. A survey of U.S. and UN-ECE regulations showed that the turn signals of a vehicle that is minimally compliant with U.S. regulations are not visible to a driver of a nearby vehicle in an adjacent lane. Measurements of mirror location and window geometry were made on 74 passenger cars and light trucks, including 38 vehicles with fender-mounted turn signals (FMTS). These data were combined with data on driver eye locations from two previous studies to assess the relative visibility of MMTS and conventional signals. Simulations were conducted to examine the potential for signals to be obstructed when a driver looks laterally through the passenger-side window. With a vehicle population that is fifty percent light trucks, MMTS are visible 52 percent more often than FMTS in this scenario.
Technical Paper
2004-11-01
Kathleen DeSantis Klinich, Sheila M. Ebert, Chris A. Van Ee, Carol A. C. Flannagan, Monica Prasad, Matthew P. Reed, Lawrence W. Schneider
In the mid 1970s, UMTRI investigated the biomechanical properties of the head and neck using 180 “normal” adult subjects selected to fill eighteen subject groups based on age (young, mid-aged, older), gender, and stature (short, medium, and tall by gender). Lateral-view radiographs of the subjects’ cervical spines and heads were taken with the subjects seated in a simulated automotive neutral posture, as well as with their necks in full-voluntary flexion and full-voluntary extension. Although the cervical spine and lower head geometry were previously measured manually and documented, new technologies have enabled computer digitization of the scanned x-ray images and a more comprehensive and detailed analysis of the variation in cervical spine and lower head geometry with subject age, stature, and gender. After scanning the radiographic images, 108 skeletal landmarks on the cervical vertebrae and 10 head landmarks were digitized. The resulting database of cervical spine and head geometry was used to study cervical spine curvature, vertebral dimensions, and head/neck orientation as functions of age, gender, and stature.
Technical Paper
2004-06-15
Matthew P. Reed, Matthew B. Parkinson, David W. Wagner
Simulations of humans performing seated reaches require accurate descriptions of the movements of the body segments that make up the torso. Data to generate such simulations were obtained in a laboratory study using industrial, auto, and truck seats. Twelve men and women reached to push-button targets located throughout their right-hand reach envelopes as their movements were recorded using an electromagnetic tracking system. The data illustrate complex patterns of motion that depend on target location and shoulder range of motion. Pelvis motion contributes substantially to seated reach capability. On padded seats, the effective center of rotation of the pelvis is often within the seat cushion below the pelvis rather than at the hips. Lumbar spine motions differ markedly depending on the location of the target. A categorization of reach targets into four zones differentiated by torso kinematics is proposed.
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