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Viewing 1 to 30 of 89
Technical Paper
2009-11-02
David L. McKain, Nigel N. Clark, Richard J. Atkinson, Zac J. Luzader, Bradley Rutledge
Yard hostlers are tractors (switchers) used to move containers at ports and storage facilities. While many speed-time driving cycles for assessing emissions and performance from heavy-duty vehicles exist, a driving cycle representative of yard hostler activity at Port of Long Beach, CA was not available. Activity data were collected from in-use yard hostlers as they performed ship loading/unloading, rail loading/unloading and other yard routines, primarily moving containers on trailers or carts. The activity data were then used to develop four speed-time driving cycles with durations of 1200 seconds, representing light and heavy ship activities and light and heavy load rail activities. These cycles were constructed using actual speed-time data collected during activity logging and the cycles created were statistically comparable to each subset of activity data.
Technical Paper
2008-06-23
Nigel N. Clark, Clinton R. Bedick, Lijuan Wang, Gregory Thompson, David McKain, Bradley Ralston
Most transient heavy duty diesel emissions data in the USA have been acquired using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), a heavy-duty diesel engine transient test schedule described in the US Code of Federal Regulations. The FTP includes both urban and freeway operation and does not provide data separated by driving mode (such as rural, urban, freeway). Recently, a four-mode engine test schedule was created for use in the Advanced Collaborative Emission Study (ACES), and was demonstrated on a 2004 engine equipped with cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR). In the present work, the authors examined emissions using these ACES modes (Creep, Cruise, Transient and High-speed Cruise) and the FTP from a Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) Series 60 1992 12.7 liter pre-EGR engine. The engine emissions were measured using full exhaust dilution, continuous measurement of gaseous species, and filter-based Particulate Matter (PM) measurement. Run-averaged brake-specific emissions varied between modes, partly because the average power varied between modes.
Technical Paper
2008-06-23
Emre Tatli, Nigel N. Clark
In 2007, US EPA implemented the rule that the crankcase emissions be added to the tailpipe emissions to determine the total emissions from a diesel engine if the crankcase were not closed, but few data exist to quantify crankcase emissions from earlier model diesel engines. This paper presents the results of a study on the measurement of the size distribution and number concentration of particulate matter (PM) emitted from the crankcase vents from four different diesel engines under different engine speeds and loads. The engines used in the study were a 1992 Detroit Diesel Series 60, a 1996 Caterpillar 3406E, a 1997 Cummins B5.9 and a 1995 Mack E7-400. The Detroit Diesel engine was tested on an engine dynamometer and crankcase and tailpipe particulates were observed at varying engine speeds and loads. The other three engines were mounted in vehicles, and crankcase PM was observed at several engine speeds with no external load. Overall, the study showed that the size distribution and number concentration profiles of crankcase particulate emissions differed substantially from engine to engine.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
John Nuszkowski, Gregory J. Thompson, Ray Tincher, Nigel N. Clark
Biodiesel fuels benefit both from being a renewable energy source and from decreasing in carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and particulate matter (PM) emissions relative to petroleum diesel. The oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions from biodiesel blended fuels reported in the literature vary relative to baseline diesel NOx, with no NOx change or a NOx decrease found by some to an increase in NOx found by others. To explore differences in NOx, two Cummins ISM engines (1999 and 2004) were operated on 20% biodiesel blends during the heavy-duty transient FTP cycle and the steady state Supplemental Emissions Test. For the 2004 Cummins ISM engine, in-cylinder pressure data were collected during the steady state and transient tests. Three types of biodiesel fuels were used in the blends: soy, tallow (animal fat), and cottonseed. The FTP integrated emissions of the B20 blends produced a 20-35% reduction in PM and no change or up to a 4.3% increase in NOx over the neat diesel. The neat diesel was a type-2 diesel with a cetane number of 49.9 and sulfur content of 320ppm.
Technical Paper
2008-04-14
Gregory J. Thompson, Daniel K. Carder, Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam
As part of the 1998 Consent Decrees concerning alternative ignition strategies between the six settling heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers and the United States government, the engine manufacturers agreed to perform in-use emissions measurements of their engines. As part of the Consent Decrees, pre- (Phase III, pre-2000 engines) and post- (Phase IV, 2001 to 2003 engines) Consent Decree engines used in over-the-road vehicles were tested to examine the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2). A summary of the emissions of NOx and CO2 and fuel consumption from the Phase III and Phase IV engines are presented for 30 second “Not-to-Exceed” (NTE) window brake-specific values. There were approximately 700 Phase III tests and 850 Phase IV tests evaluated in this study, incorporating over 170 different heavy duty diesel engines spanning 1994 to 2003 model years. Test vehicles were operated over city, suburban, and highway routes. The results show that the post Consent Decree engines' 30 second NTE brake-specific NOx values were below the NOx NTE allowance limit.
Technical Paper
2007-10-29
Francisco Posada, Clint Bedick, Nigel N. Clark, Aleksandr Kozlov, Martin Linck, Dmitri Boulanov, John Pratapas
The key to overcoming Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) load range limitations is based on suitable control over the thermo-chemical properties of the in-cylinder charge. The proposed alternative to achieve the required control of LTC is the use of two separate fuel streams to regulate timing and heat release at specific operational points, where the secondary fuel, with different autoignition characteristics, is a reformed product of the primary fuel in the tank. It is proposed in this paper that the secondary fuel is produced using Thermo-Chemical Recuperation (TCR) with steam/fuel reforming. The steam/fuel mixture is heated by sensible heat from the engine exhaust gases in the recuperative reformer, where the original hydrocarbon reacts with water to form a hydrogen rich gas mixture. An equilibrium model developed by Gas Technology Institute (GTI) for n-heptane steam reforming was applied to estimate reformed fuel composition at different reforming temperatures. Laboratory results, at a steam/n-heptane mole ratio less than 2:1, confirm that reforming reactions, in the temperature range of 550 K to 650 K, can produce 10-30% hydrogen (by volume, wet) in the product stream.
Technical Paper
2007-08-05
Nigel N. Clark, ABM S. Khan, W. Scott Wayne, Mridul Gautam, Gregory J. Thompson, David L. McKain, Donald W. Lyons, Ryan Barnett
Transit agencies across the United States operate bus fleets primarily powered by diesel, natural gas, and hybrid drive systems. Passenger loading affects the power demanded from the engine, which in turn affects distance-specific emissions and fuel consumption. Analysis shows that the nature of bus activity, taking into account the idle time, tire rolling resistance, wind drag, and acceleration energy, influences the way in which passenger load impacts emissions. Emissions performance and fuel consumption from diesel and natural gas powered buses were characterized by the West Virginia University (WVU) Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory. A comparison matrix for all three bus technologies included three common driving cycles (the Braunschweig Cycle, the OCTA Cycle, and the ADEME-RATP Paris Cycle). Each bus was tested at three different passenger loading conditions (empty weight, half weight, and full weight). Carbon dioxide (CO2) from a John Deere powered natural gas bus was higher at full weight than that at empty test weight.
Technical Paper
2007-04-16
Mario G. Perhinschi, W. Scott Wayne, Nigel N. Clark, Donald W. Lyons
West Virginia University has conducted research to characterize the emissions from medium-duty vehicles operating on Fischer-Tropsch synthetic gas-to-liquid compression ignition fuel. The West Virginia University Transportable Heavy Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory was used to collect data for gaseous emissions (carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and total hydrocarbon) while the vehicles were exercised through a representative driving schedule, the New York City Bus Cycle (NYCB). Artificial neural networks were used to model emissions to enhance the capabilities of computer-based vehicle operation simulators. This modeling process is presented in this paper. Vehicle velocity, acceleration, torque at rear axel, and exhaust temperature were used as inputs to the neural networks. For each of the four gaseous emissions considered, one set of training data and one set of validating data were used, both based on the New York City Bus Cycle. Four different types of artificial neural networks were investigated: linear, single hidden layer with sigmoid activation function, nonlinear polynomial (Sigma Pi), and Gaussian radial basis function neural network.
Technical Paper
2007-01-23
Nigel N. Clark, W. Scott Wayne, ABM S. Khan, Donald W. Lyons, Mridul Gautam, David L. McKain, Gregory J. Thompson, Ryan Barnett
Although diesel engines still power most of the heavy-duty transit buses in the United States, many major cities are also operating fleets where a significant percentage of buses is powered by lean-burn natural gas engines. Emissions from these buses are often expressed in distance-specific units of grams per mile (g/mile) or grams per kilometer (g/km), but the driving cycle or route employed during emissions measurement has a strong influence on the reported results. A driving cycle that demands less energy per unit distance than others results in higher fuel economy and lower distance-specific oxides of nitrogen emissions. In addition to energy per unit distance, the degree to which the driving cycle is transient in nature can also affect emissions. Speed correction factors for heavy-duty diesel vehicle oxides of nitrogen emissions have been utilized to account for differences in driving cycles and show that distance-specific emissions have a non-linear relationship with average driving cycle speed.
Technical Paper
2007-01-23
Yuebin Wu, Nigel N. Clark, Daniel Carder, Gregory J. Thompson, Mridul Gautam, Donald W. Lyons
Heavy-Duty Diesel (HDD) engines' particulate matter (PM) emissions are most often measured quantitatively by weighing filters that collect diluted exhaust samples pre- and post-test. PM sampling systems that dilute exhaust gas and collect PM samples have different effects on measured PM data. Those effects usually contribute to inter-laboratory variance. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s 2007 PM emission measurement regulations for the test of HDD engines should reduce variability, but must also cope with PM mass that is an order of magnitude lower than legacy engine testing. To support the design of a 2007 US standard HDD PM emission sampling system, a parametric study based on a systematic Simulink® model was performed. This model acted as an auxiliary design tool when setting up a new 2007 HDD PM emission sampling system in a heavy-duty test cell at West Virginia University (WVU). It was also designed to provide assistance in post-test data processing. Modeling of gas chemical composition, mass, and heat transfer, as well as modeling of the primary and the secondary tunnel, were addressed.
Technical Paper
2006-10-16
Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam, W. Scott Wayne, Gregory J. Thompson, Ralph D. Nine, Donald W. Lyons, Thomas Buffamonte, Shuhong Xu, Hector Maldonado
Heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) emissions are known to affect air quality, but few studies have quantified the real-world contribution to the inventory. The objective of this study was to provide data that may enable ambient emissions investigators to m,odel the air quality more accurately. The 25 vehicles reported in this paper are from the first phase of a program to determine representative regulated emissions from Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks (HHDDT) operating in Southern California. Emissions data were gathered using a chassis dynamometer, full flow dilution tunnel, and research grade analyzers. The subject program employed two truck test weights and four new test modes (one was idle operation), in addition to the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS), and the AC50/80 cycle. The reason for such a broad test cycle scope was to determine thoroughly how HHDDT emissions are influenced by operating cycle to improve accuracy of models. Overall, it was determined from these Phase 1 data that oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions did not decrease in relation to the HHDDT Model Year (MY) and all MY bins produced about 20 g/mile of NOx on the UDDS.
Technical Paper
2006-10-16
Nathan A. Moynahan, Gregory J. Thompson, Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam
The 1998 Consent Decrees between the United States Government and the settling heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers require in-use emissions testing from post 2000 model year engines. The emissions gathered from these engines must be reported on a brake-specific mass basis. To report brake-specific mass emissions, three primary parameters must be measured. These are the concentration of each emission constituent, the exhaust mass flow rate, and the engine power output. The measurement of the concentration level and exhaust mass flow rate can be (and are generally) measured directly with instrumentation installed in the exhaust transfer tube. However, engine power cannot be measured directly for in-use emissions testing due to the direct coupling of the engine output shaft to the vehicle's transmission. Engine power can be inferred from the electronic control unit (ECU) broadcast of engine speed and engine torque. The use of engine power from the ECU presents a problem in that one must rely on the accuracy of the manufacturer's broadcast values.
Technical Paper
2006-10-16
David L. McKain, Richard J. Atkinson, Nigel N. Clark, Victor H. Mucino, J Víctor Hugo Páramo Figueroa, Sergio Zirath Hernández Villaseñor, Cesar Fausto Gálvez Hernández, Enrique Rivero Borrel, Rodrigo Perrusquía Máximo, Daniel León Cervantes
It is difficult to project the emissions performance of a vehicle on a route unless the test cycle used to gain the emissions data reasonably represents that route. A chassis dynamometer emissions measurement test schedule consisting of three modes (congested, non-congested and bus rapid transit (BRT) operation) was developed for use in a program to evaluate transit bus technologies in Mexico City. Existing buses were fitted with global positioning system (GPS) data loggers and, between September 2nd and 8th of 2004, 54 hours of speed-time data were collected while the buses were operated over several bus routes in Mexico City. The data set was then broken down into individual micro-trips, each consisting of an idle period followed by the bus traveling some distance, followed by a final deceleration to idle. An initial attempt to categorize each micro-trip according to time-of-day and thus determine whether the micro-trip occurred during defined rush-hour and non-rush-hour periods was unsuccessful due a lack of correlation between congested conditions in Mexico City and time-of-day (i.e. there is no clearly defined and spatially extensive rush-hour).
Technical Paper
2006-10-16
Gregory J. Thompson, John C. Gibble, Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam
The 1998 Consent Decrees between the settling heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers and the United States Government require the engine manufacturer to perform in-use emissions testing to evaluate their engine designs and emissions when the vehicle is placed into service. This additional requirement will oblige the manufacturer to account for real-world conditions when designing engines and engine control algorithms and include driving conditions, ambient conditions, and fuel properties in addition to the engine certification test procedures. Engine operation and ambient conditions can be designed into the engine control algorithm. However, there will most likely be no on-board determination of fuel properties or composition in the near future. Therefore, the engine manufacturer will need to account for varying fuel properties when developing the engine control algorithm for when in-use testing is performed. A comparison of the emissions from a heavy-duty engine has shown that commercially available fuel can dramatically affect the emissions along with the test cycle used to evaluate the emissions.
Technical Paper
2006-10-16
Nigel N. Clark, Emre Tatli, Ryan Barnett, W. Scott Wayne, David L. McKain
In 2007, the Environmental Protection Agency will begin measuring not only exhaust emissions from diesel engines, but also emissions from the crankcase if it is not vented into the engine intake. The 2007 government standards for emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) will also become more restrictive. There is the additional concern that crankcase emissions from present day trucks and buses may impact the quality of air inside the vehicle. This paper presents data to characterize crankcase emissions and examines a crankcase emissions abatement system (CEAS), the New Condensator®, manufactured by World NCI. Rather than allowing crankcase emissions to leave via a vent tube, a CEAS re-circulates the emissions to the intake of the engine. In this study, crankcase and tailpipe emissions were measured from a 1996 Peterbilt tractor truck powered by a Caterpillar 3406, 550hp engine with approximately 400,000 accumulated miles, to quantify the emissions benefits of closing the crankcase with the CEAS.
Technical Paper
2005-10-24
Corey M. Strimer, Nigel N. Clark, Daniel Carder, Mridul Gautam, Gregory Thompson
On-board emissions measurement for heavy-duty vehicles has taken on greater significance because new standards now address in-use emissions levels in the USA. Emissions compliance must be shown in a “Not-to-exceed” (NTE) zone that excludes engine operation at low power. An over-the-road 1996 Peterbilt tractor was instrumented with the West Virginia University Mobile Emissions Measurement System (MEMS). The researchers determined how often the truck entered the NTE, and the emissions from the vehicle, as it was driven over different routes and at different test weights (20,740 lb, 34,640 lb, 61,520 lb, and 79,700 lb) The MEMS interfaced with the truck ECU, while also measuring exhaust flowrate, and concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the exhaust. The four test routes that were employed included varying terrain types in order to simulate a wide range of on-road driving conditions. One route (called the Bruceton route) included a sustained hill climb. Another route (known as the Saltwell route) traversed more rolling hills throughout the duration of the test.
Technical Paper
2005-05-11
Chamila A. Tissera, Matt M. Swartz, Emre Tatli, Ramprabhu Vellaisamy, Nigel N. Clark, Gregory J. Thompson, Richard J. Atkinson
Selective NOX Recirculation (SNR) involves three main steps in NOX reduction. The first step adsorbs NOX from the exhaust stream, followed by periodic desorption from the aftertreatment medium. The final step passes the desorbed NOX gas into the intake air stream and feeds into the engine. A percentage of the NOX is expected to be decomposed during the combustion process. The motivation for this research was to clarify the reduction of NOX from large stationary engines. The objective of this paper is to report the NOX decomposition phenomenon during the combustion process from three test engines. The results will be used to develop an optimal system for the conversion of NOX with a NOX adsorbtion system. A 1993 Cummins L10G natural gas engine, a 1992 Detroit Diesel series 60 engine and a 13hp Honda gasoline engine were used in the experiments. Commercially available nitric oxide (NO) was injected into the engine intake to mimic the NOX stream from the desorption process. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio, injected NO quantity and engine operating points affected the NOX decomposition rates.
Technical Paper
2005-05-11
Csaba Tóth-Nagy, Nigel N. Clark
This study summarizes the work that has been done on the linear engine since it's invention. It attempts to highlight some of the major technologies, designs, and old and recent developments in the long history of the linear engine. In this paper, linear engines are grouped and studied from different standpoints such as internal or external combustion, 2-stroke vs. 4-stroke, number and arrangement of pistons, fuel type, the type of the machine the linear engine drives, depth of investigation, and the complexity of modeling the linear engine. This paper concludes that although simulation of the linear engine has been done with varying complexity and accuracy by several research groups and prototypes have run showing experimental results that predict higher efficiency for the linear engine than that of conventional engines, much work has to be done before the linear engine becomes commercially available.
Technical Paper
2005-05-11
Shuhong Xu, Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam, W. Scott Wayne
The Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) measures captured particle mass continuously on a small filter held on an oscillating element. In addition to traditional filter-based particulate matter (PM) measurement, a TEOM was used to characterize PM from the dilute exhaust of trucks examined in two phases (Phase 1.5 and Phase 2) of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Inventory Project E-55/E-59. Test schedules employed were the Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) test schedule that consists of four modes (Idle, Creep, Transient and Cruise), the HHDDT Short (HHDDT_S) which represents high-speed freeway operation, and the Heavy-Duty Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS). TEOM results were on average 6% lower than those from traditional particulate filter weighing. Data (in units of g/cycle) were examined by plotting cycle-averaged TEOM mass against filter mass. Regression (R2) values for these plots were from 0.88 to 0.99. The TEOM/filter mass ratio varied most, and correlation was the worst, for the Idle and the HHDDT_S but it was steady for the UDDS, Creep, Transient, and Cruise cycles.
Technical Paper
2005-04-11
Kuntal A. Vora, Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam, W. Scott Wayne
When heavy-duty truck emissions rates are expressed in distance-specific units (such as g/mile), average speed and the degree of transient behavior of the vehicle activity can affect the emissions rate. Previous one-dimensional studies have shown some correlation of distance-specific emissions rates between cycles. This paper reviews emissions data sets from the 5-mode CARB Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) Schedule, the Heavy Duty Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) and an inspection and maintenance cycle, known as the AC5080. A heavy-duty chassis dynamometer was used for emissions characterization along with a full-scale dilution tunnel. The vehicle test weights were simulated at 56,000 lbs. Two-dimensional correlations were used to predict the emissions rate on one mode or cycle from the rates of two other modes or cycles. Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were the two components of emissions which were of interest, and they were reviewed in units of g/mile.
Technical Paper
2005-04-11
Ramprabhu Vellaisamy, Nigel N. Clark, Gregory J. Thompson, Richard J. Atkinson, Chamila A. Tissera, Matt M. Swartz
Emissions from diesel engines, particularly NOx and TPM emissions are harmful to the environment. Reduction of NOx emissions from diesel engines is of increasing concern. In 1998, a novel approach called Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) was used to reduce NOx emissions in diesel engines. The SNR concept relies on two major parts, one to collect the NOx emissions from the exhaust by an adsorber, and another to decompose NOx using the in-cylinder combustion process by injecting the collected NOx emissions into the intake manifold at an elevated concentration. This paper deals with the destruction rates during the combustion process. A 1992 DDC series 60, 350 hp, 12.7 liter engine was connected to a 500 hp DC dynamometer. A full-scale dilution tunnel and analyzers capable of measuring continuous NOx, CO2, CO, HC, and PM in the exhaust were used. Bottled nitric oxide (NO) gas was injected into the intake manifold through a mass flow controller in order to assess NOx decomposition at various loads and concentrations.
Technical Paper
2005-04-11
Matt M. Swartz, Chamila A. Tissera, Emre Tatli, Ramprabhu Vellaisamy, Nigel N. Clark, Gregory J. Thompson, Richard J. Atkinson
Understanding the nitric oxide (NO) conversion process plays a major role in optimizing the Selective NOX Recirculation (SNR) technique. SNR has been proven in gasoline and diesel engines, with up to 90% NOX conversion rates being achieved. This technique involves adsorbing NOX from an exhaust stream, then selectively desorbing the NOX into a concentrated NOX stream, which is fed back into the engine's intake, thereby converting a percentage of the concentrated NOX stream into harmless gases. The emphasis of this paper is on the unique chemical kinetic modeling problem that occurs with high concentrations of NOX in the intake air of a spark ignited natural gas engine with SNR. CHEMKIN, a chemical kinetic solver software package, was used to perform the reaction modeling. A closed homogeneous batch reactor model was used to model the fraction of NOX versus time for varying initial conditions and constants. The molar fraction of NOX was monitored on small time scales, on the order of the time for complete combustion, and on large time scales, on the order of minutes.
Technical Paper
2004-10-25
Kuntal A. Vora, Nigel N. Clark, Ralph D. Nine, Mridul Gautam, W. Scott Wayne, Gregory J. Thompson, Donald W. Lyons
When heavy-duty truck emissions are expressed in distance-specific units (such as g/mile), the values may depend strongly on the nature of the test cycle or schedule. Prior studies have compared emissions gained using different schedules and have proposed techniques for translating emissions factor rates between schedules. This paper reviews emissions data from the 5-mode CARB HHDDT Schedule, UDDS Schedule, and a steady-state cycle (AC5080), with reference to each other. NOX and PM emissions are the two components of emissions which are reviewed. A heavy-duty chassis dynamometer was used for emissions characterization along with a full scale dilution tunnel. The vehicle test weights were simulated at 30,000 lbs, 56,000 lbs, and 66,000 lbs. For each vehicle, average data from one mode or cycle have been compared with average data for a different mode or cycle. When the Cruise Mode and Transient Mode of the HHDDT Schedule were compared, it was evident that injection timing strategies affected the average Cruise Mode emissions of NOX.
Technical Paper
2004-10-25
Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam, W. Scott Wayne, Wesley Riddle, Ralph D. Nine, Donald W. Lyons, Shuhong Xu
Repeatable measurement of real-world heavy-duty diesel truck emissions requires the use of a chassis dynamometer with a test schedule that reasonably represents actual truck use. A new Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) schedule has been created that consists of four modes, termed Idle, Creep, Transient and Cruise. The effect of driving style on emissions from the Transient Mode was studied by driving a 400 hp Mack tractor at 56,000 lbs. test weight in fashions termed “Medium”, “Good”, “Bad”, “Casual” and “Aggressive”. Although there were noticeable differences in the actual speed vs. time trace for these five styles, emissions of the important species oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM), varied little with a coefficient of variation (COV) of 5.13% on NOX and 10.68% on PM. Typical NOx values for the HHDDT Transient mode ranged from 19.9 g/mile to 22.75 g/mile. The Transient mode which was the most difficult mode to drive, proved to be repeatable. Measurements using the Idle mode showed that engine auxiliary loads can affect run-to-run repeatability.
Technical Paper
2004-03-08
Miguel M. Gomez, Victor H. Mucino, Nigel N. Clark, James E. Smith
Continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) are usually used in small vehicles due to power limitations on the variable elements. Continuously variable power-split transmissions (CVPST) were developed in order to reduce the fraction of power passing through the variable elements [1,2]. The configuration presented in this paper includes a planetary gear train (PGT), which in combination with the CVT allows the power to be split and therefore increase the power envelope of the system. The PGT also provides a branch that can be used in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) operation through an electric motor. A conceptual design of a CVPST for a HEV is presented in this paper. The objectives are to show the different operational modes, with diagrams, perform a power analysis, develop the velocity and force equations and finally show the performance of the system with an example application. The results of this conceptual design study may help to extend CVT applications in the automotive industry for light duty applications such as pickup trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles (SUV).
Technical Paper
2003-10-27
Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam, W. Scott Wayne, Ralph D. Nine, Gregory J. Thompson, Donald W. Lyons, Hector Maldonado, Mark Carlock, Archana Agrawal
The California Air Resources Board (ARB) developed a Medium Heavy-Duty Truck (MHDT) schedule by selecting and joining microtrips from real-world MHDT. The MHDT consisted of three modes; namely, a Lower Speed Transient, a Higher Speed Transient, and a Cruise mode. The maximum speeds of these modes were 28.9, 58.2 and 66.0 mph, respectively. Each mode represented statistically selected truck behavior patterns in California. The MHDT is intended to be applied to emissions characterization of trucks (14,001 to 33,000lb gross vehicle weight) exercised on a chassis dynamometer. This paper presents the creation of the MHDT and an examination of repeatability of emissions data from MHDT driven through this schedule. Two trucks were procured to acquire data using the MHDT schedule. The first, a GMC truck with an 8.2-liter Isuzu engine and a standard transmission, was tested at laden weight (90% GVW, 17,550lb) and at unladen weight (50% GVW, 9,750lb). The second, a Freightliner with a 7.2-liter Caterpillar engine and an automatic transmission, was tested only at 13,000lb (50% GVW).
Technical Paper
2003-05-19
Nigel N. Clark, W. Scott Wayne, Ralph D. Nine, Thomas Buffamonte, Timothy Hall, Byron L. Rapp, Gregory Thompson, Donald W. Lyons
Few real-world data exist to describe the contribution of diesel vehicles to the emissions inventory, although it is widely acknowledged that diesel vehicles are a significant contributor to oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) in Southern California. New data were acquired during the Gasoline/Diesel PM Split Study, designed to collect emissions data for source profiling of PM emissions from diesel- and gasoline-powered engines in the South Coast (Los Angeles) Air Basin in 2001. Regulated gases, PM and carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured from 34 diesel vehicles operating in the Southern California area. Two were transit buses, 16 were trucks over 33,000 lbs. in weight, 8 were 14,001 lbs. to 33,000 lbs. in weight and 8 were under 14,001 lbs. in weight. The vehicles were also grouped by model year for recruiting and data analysis. Emissions were measured in Riverside, CA, using West Virginia University's (WVU) Transportable Medium-Duty and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratories.
Technical Paper
2003-05-19
Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam, James Boyce, Wenwei Xie, Sandeep Mehta, Ron Jarett, Byron Rapp
Concern over health effects associated with diesel exhaust and debate over the influence of high number counts of particles in diesel exhaust prompted research to develop a methodology for diesel particulate matter (PM) characterization. As part of this program, a tractor truck with an electronically managed diesel engine and a dynamometer were installed in the Old Dominion University (ODU) Langley full-scale wind tunnel. This arrangement permitted repeat measurements of diesel exhaust under realistic and reproducible conditions and permitted examination of the steady exhaust plume at multiple points. Background particle size distribution was characterized using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). In addition, a remote sampling system consisting of a SMPS, PM filter arrangement, and carbon dioxide (CO2) analyzer, was attached to a roving gantry allowing for exhaust plume sampling in a three dimensional grid. Raw exhaust CO2 levels and truck performance data were also measured. The plume centerline was mapped and dilution ratios were determined and mapped.
Technical Paper
2003-05-19
Mridul Gautam, Nigel N. Clark, Sandeep Mehta, James A. Boyce, Fred Rogers, Alan Gertler
In an effort to develop engine/vehicle test methods that will reflect real-world emission characteristics, West Virginia University (WVU) designed and conducted a study on a Class-8 tractor with an electronically controlled diesel engine that was mounted on a chassis dynamometer in the Old Dominion University Langley full-scale wind tunnel. With wind speeds set at 88 km/hr in the tunnel, and the tractor operating at 88 km/hr on the chassis dynamometer, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was employed for measuring PM size distributions and concentrations. The SMPS was housed in a container that was attached to a three-axis gantry in the wind tunnel. Background PM size-distributions were measured with another SMPS unit that was located upstream of the truck plume. Ambient temperatures were recorded at each of the sampling locations. The truck was also operated through transient tests with vehicle speeds varying from 65 to 88 km/hr, with a wind speed of 76 km/hr. Sampling of the plume with the truck operating at 88 km/hr revealed uni-modal distributions with geometric mean diameter (GMD) values ranging from 55 to 80 nm.
Technical Paper
2003-05-19
W. Scott Wayne, Ralph D. Nine, Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam, Paul Moynihan, Thomas Balon, Marty Chiaramonte, Michael Prostakov
Diesel particulate matter emissions, because they do not disperse as readily gaseous emissions, have a very localized effect and eventually settle to the ground not far from where they were emitted. One subset of heavy-duty diesel vehicles that warrant further attention for controlling particulate emissions matter is sanitation trucks. Cummins Inc. and West Virginia University investigated particulate emissions reduction technologies for New York City Department of Sanitation refuse trucks under the EPA Consent Decree program. Regulated emissions were measured on four retrofitted sanitation trucks with and without the DPF installed. Cummins engines powered all of the retrofitted trucks. The Engelhard DPX reduced PM emissions by 97% and 84% on the New York Garbage Truck Cycle (NYGTC) and Orange County Refuse Truck Cycle (OCRTC) respectively. The Johnson-Matthey CRT system reduced PM emissions by 81% and 87% over the NYGTC and OCRTC respectively. HC emissions with the DPX installed were below the detectable limit of the laboratory over the OCRTC.
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