Criteria

Text:
Author:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 151
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jian Huang, Zhi Wang, Martin Wissink, Rolf D. Reitz
Abstract The effects of the temporal and spatial distributions of ignition timings of combustion zones on combustion noise in a Direct Injection Compression Ignition (DICI) engine were studied using experimental tests and numerical simulations. The experiments were performed with different fuel injection strategies on a heavy-duty diesel engine. Cylinder pressure was measured with the sampling intervals of 0.1°CA in order to resolve noise components. The simulations were performed using the KIVA-3V code with detailed chemistry to analyze the in-cylinder ignition and combustion processes. The experimental results show that optimal sequential ignition and spatial distribution of combustion zones can be realized by adopting a two-stage injection strategy in which the proportion of the pilot injection fuel and the timings of the injections can be used to control the combustion process, thus resulting in simultaneously higher thermal efficiency and lower noise emissions. Simulated results show that if a large amount of the combustion occurs near the liner walls of the combustion chamber, this significantly contributes to high amplitude pressure oscillations, which leads to heavy knock and low thermal efficiency.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Qi Jiao, Rolf D. Reitz
Abstract 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations have been performed to study particulate formation in a Spark-Ignition (SI) engine under premixed conditions. A semi-detailed soot model and a chemical kinetic model, including poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation, were coupled with a spark ignition model and the G equation flame propagation model for SI engine simulations and for predictions of soot mass and particulate number density. The simulation results for in-cylinder pressure and particle size distribution (PSDs) are compared to available experimental studies of equivalence ratio effects during premixed operation. Good predictions are observed with regard to cylinder pressure, combustion phasing and engine load. Qualitative agreements of in-cylinder particle distributions were also obtained and the results are helpful to understand particulate formation processes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bishwadipa Das Adhikary, Rolf D. Reitz, Stephen Ciatti, Christopher Kolodziej
Abstract The use of gasoline in a compression ignition engine has been a research focus lately due to the ability of gasoline to provide more premixing, resulting in controlled emissions of the nitrogen oxides [NOx] and particulate matter. The present study assesses the reactivity of 93 RON [87AKI] gasoline in a GM 1.9L 4-cylinder diesel engine, to extend the low load limit. A single injection strategy was used in available experiments where the injection timing was varied from −42 to −9 deg ATDC, with a step-size of 3 deg. The minimum fueling level was defined in the experiments such that the coefficient of variance [COV] of indicated mean effective pressure [IMEP] was less than 3%. The study revealed that injection at −27 deg ATDC allowed a minimum load of 2 bar BMEP. Also, advancement in the start of injection [SOI] timing in the experiments caused an earlier CA50, which became retarded with further advancement in SOI timing. To help explain these behaviors, simulations were carried out using the KIVA3V CFD code coupled with a Jacobian chemistry solver, SpeedChem.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Christopher P. Kolodziej, Stephen Ciatti, David Vuilleumier, Bishwadipa Das Adhikary, Rolf D. Reitz
Abstract Previous work has demonstrated the capabilities of gasoline compression ignition to achieve engine loads as high as 19.5 bar BMEP with a production multi-cylinder diesel engine using gasoline with an anti-knock index (AKI) of 87. In the current study, the low load limit of the engine was investigated using the same engine hardware configurations and 87 AKI fuel that was used to achieve 19.5 bar BMEP. Single injection, “minimum fueling” style injection timing and injection pressure sweeps (where fuel injection quantity was reduced at each engine operating condition until the coefficient of variance of indicated mean effective pressure rose to 3%) found that the 87 AKI test fuel could run under stable combustion conditions down to a load of 1.5 bar BMEP at an injection timing of −30 degrees after top dead center (°aTDC) with reduced injection pressure, but still without the use of intake air heating or uncooled EGR. A 0.4% concentration (by volume) of 2-Ethylhexyl Nitrate (EHN) was added to the 87 AKI test fuel to test the effects of increased reactivity on the minimum load attainable and injection timing at which it would occur, while maintaining similar physical mixing properties.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jae Hyung Lim, N. Ryan Walker, Sage Kokjohn, Rolf D. Reitz
Abstract In recent years society's demand and interest in clean and efficient internal combustion engines has grown significantly. Several ideas have been proposed and tested to meet this demand. In particular, dual-fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion has demonstrated high thermal efficiency, and low engine-out NOx, and soot emissions. Unlike homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion, which solely relies on the chemical kinetics of the fuel for ignition control, RCCI combustion has proven to provide superior combustion controllability while retaining the known benefits of low emissions and high thermal efficiency of HCCI combustion. However, in order for RCCI combustion to be adopted as a high efficiency and low engine-out emission solution, it is important to achieve high-power operation that is comparable to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). The present study includes experimental results that show that load increase at mid-speed operation is limited by increasing peak pressure rise rates (PPRR).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Federico Perini, Dipankar Sahoo, Paul Miles, Rolf D. Reitz
In this paper, we studied the accuracy of computational modeling of the ignition of a pilot injectionin the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) light-duty optical engine facility, using the physical properties of a cetane/iso-cetane Diesel Primary Reference Fuel (DPRF) mixture and the reaction kinetics of a well-validated mechanism for primary reference fuels. Local fuel-air equivalence ratio measurements from fuel tracer based planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) experiments were used to compare the mixture formation predictions with KIVA-ERC-based simulations. The effects of variations in injection mass from 1 mg to 4 mg, in-cylinder swirl ratio, and near-TDC temperatures on non-combusting mixture preparation were analyzed, to assess the accuracy of the model in capturing average jet behavior, despite its inability to model the non-negligible jet-by-jet variations seen in the experiments. Fired simulations were able to capture well the measured ignitability trends at the different injection conditions tested, but showed some deviations in the minimum temperature needed for robust ignition, pointing out the need for further work to focus on achieving fully comprehensive modeling with detailed chemical kinetics of the DPRF58 mixture and a full engine geometry representation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xingyuan Su, Youngchul Ra, Rolf D. Reitz
Real transportation fuels, such as gasoline and diesel, are mixtures of thousands of different hydrocarbons. For multidimensional engine applications, numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included exceeds present computational capabilities. Consequently, surrogate fuel models are normally utilized. A good surrogate fuel model should approximate the essential physical and chemical properties of the real fuel. In this work, we present a novel methodology for the formulation of surrogate fuel models based on local optimization and sensitivity analysis technologies. Within the proposed approach, several important fuel properties are considered. Under the physical properties, we focus on volatility, density, lower heating value (LHV), and viscosity, while the chemical properties relate to the chemical composition, hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio, and ignition behavior. An error tolerance is assigned to each property for convergence checking. In addition, a weighting factor is given to each property indicating its individual importance among all properties considered; the overall quality of the surrogate fuel model is controlled by a weighted error tolerance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Johannes Ulrich Eichmeier, Rolf D. Reitz, Christopher Rutland
Homogeneous low temperature combustion is believed to be a promising approach to resolve the conflict of goals between high efficiency and low exhaust emissions. Disadvantageously for this kind of combustion, the whole process depends on chemical kinetics and thus is hard to control. Reactivity controlled combustion can help to overcome this difficulty. In the so-called RCCI (reactivity controlled compression ignition) combustion concept a small amount of pilot diesel that is injected directly into the combustion chamber ignites a highly diluted gasoline-air mixture. As the gasoline does not ignite without the diesel, the pilot injection timing and the ratio between diesel and gasoline can be used to control the combustion process. A phenomenological multi-zone model to predict RCCI combustion has been developed and validated against experimental and 3D-CFD data. The model captures the main physics governing ignition and combustion. The direct diesel injection is modeled using Hiroyasu's packet approach, where all packets are treated as thermodynamic zones.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Federico Perini, Bishwadipa Das Adhikary, Jae Hyung Lim, Xingyuan Su, Youngchul Ra, Hu Wang, Rolf D. Reitz
The incorporation of detailed chemistry models in internal combustion engine simulations is becoming mandatory as local, globally lean, low-temperature combustion strategies are setting the path towards a more efficient and environmentally sustainable use of energy resources in transportation. In this paper, we assessed the computational efficiency of a recently developed sparse analytical Jacobian chemistry solver, namely ‘SpeedCHEM’, that features both direct and Krylov-subspace solution methods for maximum efficiency for both small and large mechanism sizes. The code was coupled with a high-dimensional clustering algorithm for grouping homogeneous reactors into clusters with similar states and reactivities, to speed-up the chemical kinetics solution in multi-dimensional combustion simulations. The methodology was validated within the KIVA-ERC code, and the computational efficiency of both methods was evaluated for different, challenging engine combustion modeling cases, including dual fuel, dual direct-injection and low-load, multiple-injection RCCI, direct injection gasoline compression ignition (GDICI), and HCCI engine operation using semi-detailed chemistry representations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Eric Gingrich, Jaal Ghandhi, Rolf D. Reitz
Abstract An experimental study has been conducted to provide insight into heat transfer to the piston of a light-duty single-cylinder research engine under Conventional Diesel (CDC), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion regimes. Two fast-response surface thermocouples embedded in the piston top measured transient temperature. A commercial wireless telemetry system was used to transmit thermocouple signals from the moving piston. A detailed comparison was made between the different combustion regimes at a range of engine speed and load conditions. The closed-cycle integrated and peak heat transfer rates were found to be lower for HCCI and RCCI when compared to CDC. Under HCCI operation, the peak heat transfer rate showed sensitivity to the 50% burn location.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Randy Hessel, Rolf D. Reitz, Mark Musculus, Jacqueline O'Connor, Daniel Flowers
One in-cylinder strategy for reducing soot emissions from diesel engines while maintaining fuel efficiency is the use of close-coupled post injections, which are small fuel injections that follow the main fuel injection after a short delay. While the in-cylinder mechanisms of diesel combustion with single injections have been studied extensively and are relatively well understood, the in-cylinder mechanisms affecting the performance and efficacy of post injections have not been clearly established. Here, experiments from a single-cylinder heavy-duty optical research engine incorporating close- coupled post injections are modeled with three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The overall goal is to complement experimental findings with CFD results to gain more insight into the relationship between post-injections and soot. This paper documents the first stage of CFD results for simulating and analyzing the experimental conditions. In this stage, an engineering CFD model with a two-stage soot sub-model facilitates development of new and appropriate analysis methods.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Reed Hanson, Rolf D. Reitz
Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is an engine combustion strategy that utilizes in-cylinder fuel blending to produce low NOx and PM emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency. The current study investigates RCCI and conventional diesel combustion (CDC) operation in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine over transient operating conditions using a high-bandwidth, transient capable engine test cell. Transient RCCI and CDC combustion and emissions results are compared over an up-speed change from 1,000 to 2,000 rev/min. and a down-speed change from 2,000 to 1,000 rev/min. at a constant 2.0 bar BMEP load. The engine experiments consisted of in-cylinder fuel blending with port fuel-injection (PFI) of gasoline and early-cycle, direct-injection (DI) of ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) for the RCCI tests and the same ULSD for the CDC tests. At the selected engine load, a step speed change was commanded and both combustion modes were compared for performance and emissions using fast response HC, NO and PM instruments.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
N. Ryan Walker, Adam B. Dempsey, Michael J. Andrie, Rolf D. Reitz
Reactivity-controlled compression ignition (RCCI) has been shown to be capable of providing improved engine efficiencies coupled with the benefit of low emissions via in-cylinder fuel blending. Much of the previous body of work has studied the benefits of RCCI operation using high injection pressures (e.g., 500 bar or greater) with common rail injection (CRI) hardware. However, low-pressure fueling technology is capable of providing significant cost savings. Due to the broad market adoption of gasoline direct injection (GDI) fueling systems, a market-type prototype GDI injector was selected for this study. Single-cylinder light-duty engine experiments were undertaken to examine the performance and emissions characteristics of the RCCI combustion strategy with low-pressure GDI technology and compared against high injection pressure RCCI operation. Gasoline and diesel were used as the low-reactivity and high-reactivity fuels, respectively. GDI injection pressures range from 150 to 200 bar, while the CRI pressures range from 250 to 500 bar.
Technical Paper
2013-04-08
Anand Krishnasamy, Rolf D. Reitz, Werner Willems, Eric Kurtz
Diesel fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbons. Since modeling their combustion characteristics with the inclusion of all hydrocarbon species is not feasible, a hybrid surrogate model approach is used in the present work to represent the physical and chemical properties of three different diesel fuels by using up to 13 and 4 separate hydrocarbon species, respectively. The surrogates are arrived at by matching their distillation profiles and important properties with the real fuel, while the chemistry surrogates are arrived at by using a Group Chemistry Representation (GCR) method wherein the hydrocarbon species in the physical property surrogates are grouped based on their chemical classes, and the chemistry of each class is represented by using up to two hydrocarbon species. The developed surrogate models were applied to predict conventional and low temperature combustion (LTC) characteristics of the three fuels in a single cylinder diesel engine using the KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN code incorporated with a “MultiChem” mechanism having 120 species and 459 reactions.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Bao-Lin Wang, Michael J. Bergin, Benjamin R. Petersen, Paul C. Miles, Rolf D. Reitz, Zhiyu Han
A generalized re-normalization group (RNG) turbulence model based on the local "dimensionality" of the flow field is proposed. In this modeling approach the model coefficients C₁, C₂, and C₃ are all constructed as functions of flow strain rate. In order to further validate the proposed turbulence model, the generalized RNG closure model was applied to model the backward facing step flow (a classic test case for turbulence models). The results indicated that the modeling of C₂ in the generalized RNG closure model is reasonable, and furthermore, the predictions of the generalized RNG model were in better agreement with experimental data than the standard RNG turbulence model. As a second step, the performance of the generalized RNG closure was investigated for a complex engine flow. The flow field generated by the generalized RNG closure model was compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) velocity measurements from an optically accessible General Motors Company 1.9L HSDI engine equipped with helical and tangential intake ports.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Hu Wang, Rolf D. Reitz, Mingfa Yao
This paper describes numerical simulations that compare the performance of two combustion CFD models against experimental data, and evaluates the effects of combustion and spray model constants on the predicted combustion and emissions under various operating conditions. The combustion models include a Characteristic Time Combustion (CTC) model and CHEMKIN with reduced chemistry models integrated in the KIVA-3Vr2 CFD code. The diesel spray process was modeled using an updated version of the KH-RT spray model that features a gas jet submodel to help reduce numerical grid dependencies, and the effects of both the spray and combustion model constants on combustion and emissions were evaluated. In addition, the performance of two soot models was compared, namely a two-step soot model, and a more detailed model that considers soot formation from PAH precursors. Experimental data from four different diesel engines under different operating conditions were used to establish and validate the computation cases.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Adam B. Dempsey, Bao-Lin Wang, Rolf D. Reitz, Benjamin Petersen, Dipankar Sahoo, Paul C. Miles
In a recent experimental study the in-cylinder spatial distribution of mixture equivalence ratio was quantified under non-combusting conditions by planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer (toluene). The measurements were made in a single-cylinder, direct-injection, light-duty diesel engine at conditions matched to an early-injection low-temperature combustion mode. A fuel amount corresponding to a low load (3.0 bar indicated mean effective pressure) operating condition was introduced with a single injection at -23.6° ATDC. The data were acquired during the mixture preparation period from near the start of injection (-22.5° ATDC) until the crank angle where the start of high-temperature heat release normally occurs (-5° ATDC). In the present study the measured in-cylinder images are compared with a fully resolved three-dimensional CFD model, namely KIVA3V-RANS simulations. The impacts of computational grid resolution and of the flow initialization method are discussed as they pertain to the mixture preparation process.
Technical Paper
2012-04-16
Derek E. Nieman, Adam B. Dempsey, Rolf D. Reitz
Many recent studies have shown that the Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion strategy can achieve high efficiency with low emissions. However, it has also been revealed that RCCI combustion is difficult at high loads due to its premixed nature. To operate at moderate to high loads with gasoline/diesel dual fuel, high amounts of EGR or an ultra low compression ratio have shown to be required. Considering that both of these approaches inherently lower thermodynamic efficiency, in this study natural gas was utilized as a replacement for gasoline as the low-reactivity fuel. Due to the lower reactivity (i.e., higher octane number) of natural gas compared to gasoline, it was hypothesized to be a better fuel for RCCI combustion, in which a large reactivity gradient between the two fuels is beneficial in controlling the maximum pressure rise rate. The multi-dimensional CFD code, KIVA3V, was used in conjunction with the CHEMKIN chemistry tool and a Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) to perform optimization for a wide range of engine operating conditions.
Video
2011-10-28
SAE 2011 High Efficiency IC Engines Symposium - Session 1- Pathways to High Efficiency Presenter Rolf D. Reitz, Univ. of Wisconsin
Technical Paper
2011-09-11
Adam B. Dempsey, Rolf D. Reitz
Many studies have demonstrated ability of low temperature combustion to yield low NOx and soot while maintaining diesel-like thermal efficiencies. Methods of achieving low temperature combustion are numerous and range from using high cetane number fuels, like diesel, with large amounts of exhaust gas recirculation, to completely premixing a high octane number fuel, like gasoline, and approaching an HCCI-like condition. Both of the aforementioned techniques have relatively short combustion duration that results in very a rapid rate of heat release, and hence very rapid rates of pressure rise. This has been one of the major challenges for premixed, low temperature combustion at mid and high load. Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been introduced recently, which is a dual fuel partially premixed combustion concept. In this strategy in-cylinder fuel blending is used to develop fuel reactivity gradients in the combustion chamber that result in a broad combustion event and reduced pressure rise rates.
Technical Paper
2011-08-30
Ettore Musu, Riccardo Rossi, Roberto Gentili, Rolf D. Reitz
This paper concerns an innovative concept to control HCCI combustion in diesel-fuelled engines. It was named Homogenous Charge Progressive Combustion (HCPC) and operates on the split-cycle principle. In previous papers the feasibility of this combustion concept was shown for light-duty diesel engines. This paper illustrates a CFD study concerning a heavy-duty version of the HCPC engine. The engine displaces 13 liters and develops 700 kW indicated power at 2200 rpm with 49% maximum indicated efficiency and clean combustion.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Bao-Lin Wang, Paul C. Miles, Rolf D. Reitz, Zhiyu Han, Benjamin Petersen
RNG k-ε closure turbulence dissipation equations are evaluated employing the CFD code KIVA-3V Release 2. The numerical evaluations start by considering simple jet flows, including incompressible air jets and compressible helium jets. The results show that the RNG closure turbulence model predicts lower jet tip penetration than the "standard" k-ε model, as well as being lower than experimental data. The reason is found to be that the turbulence kinetic energy is dissipated too slowly in the downstream region near the jet nozzle exit. In this case, the over-predicted R term in RNG model becomes a sink of dissipation in the ε-equation. As a second step, the RNG turbulence closure dissipation models are further tested in complex engine flows to compare against the measured evolution of turbulence kinetic energy, and an estimate of its dissipation rate, during both the compression and expansion processes. In this case the turbulence energy is also over-predicted, because the turbulence model is not sufficiently dissipative.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Adam B. Dempsey, Rolf D. Reitz
The potential of low temperature combustion to yield low NOx and soot while maintaining diesel-like thermal efficiencies has been demonstrated through countless studies. Methods of achieving low temperature combustion are just as numerous and they range from using high cetane number fuels, like diesel, with large amounts of exhaust gas recirculation, to completely premixing a high octane number fuel, like gasoline, and approaching an HCCI-like condition. The potential of operating a heavy-duty compression ignition engine fueled with conventional gasoline in a partially premixed combustion mode to have high thermal efficiency and low emissions has been demonstrated in this study. The objective of this work was to optimize the engine using computational tools. The KIVA3V-CHEMKIN code, a multi-dimensional engine CFD model was coupled to a Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA II), which is a multi-objective genetic algorithm. Two engine operating conditions were investigated in this study, a mid-load and a high-load point, 11 bar and 21 bar IMEP, respectively.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Jessica L. Brakora, Youngchul Ra, Rolf D. Reitz
Biodiesel-fueled engine simulations were performed using the KIVA3v-Release 2 code coupled with Chemkin-II for detailed chemistry. The model incorporates a reduced mechanism that was created from a methyl decanoate/methyl-9-decenoate mechanism developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A combination of Directed Relation Graph, chemical lumping, and limited reaction rate tuning was used to reduce the detailed mechanism from 3299 species and 10806 reactions to 77 species and 209 reactions. The mechanism was validated against its detailed counterpart and predicted accurate ignition delay times over a range of relevant operating conditions. The mechanism was then combined with the ERC PRF mechanism to include n-heptane as an additional fuel component. The biodiesel mechanism was applied in KIVA using a discrete multi-component model with accurate physical properties for the five common components of real biodiesel fuel. A mixture of methyl decanoate and methyl-9-decenoate was used as the biodiesel surrogate to account for both the saturated and unsaturated components found in real biodiesel fuels.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Karthik V. Puduppakkam, Long Liang, Chitralkumar V. Naik, Ellen Meeks, Sage L. Kokjohn, Rolf D. Reitz
A multi-component fuel model is used to represent gasoline in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of a dual-fuel engine that combines premixed gasoline injection with diesel direct injection. The simulations employ detailed-kinetics mechanisms for both the gasoline and diesel surrogate fuels, through use of an advanced and efficient chemistry solver. The objective of this work is to elucidate kinetics effects of dual-fuel usage in Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion. The model is applied to simulate recent experiments on highly efficient RCCI engines. These engine experiments used a dual-fuel RCCI strategy with port-fuel-injection of gasoline and early-cycle, multiple injections of diesel fuel with a conventional diesel injector. The experiments showed that the US 2010 heavy-duty NO and soot emissions regulations were easily met without aftertreatment, while achieving greater than 50% net indicated thermal efficiency. However, as with other low-temperature combustion strategies, CO and unburnt hydrocarbon emissions must be controlled.
Technical Paper
2011-04-12
Michael J. Tess, Chang-Wook Lee, Rolf D. Reitz
Several diffusion combustion scaling models were experimentally tested in two geometrically similar single-cylinder diesel engines with a bore diameter ratio of 1.7. Assuming that the engines have the same in-cylinder thermodynamic conditions and equivalence ratio, the combustion models primarily change the fuel injection pressure and engine speed in order to attain similar performance and emissions. The models tested include an extended scaling model, which scales diffusion flame lift-off length and jet spray penetration; a simple scaling model, which only scales spray penetration at equal mean piston speed; and a same speed scaling model, which holds crankshaft rotational velocity constant while also scaling spray penetration. Successfully scaling diffusion combustion proved difficult to accomplish because of apparent differences that remained in the fuel-air mixing and heat transfer processes. A computational investigation revealed that the larger nozzle diameter (relative to the ideal scaled value) used in the small engine experiments caused spray-wall impingement, which altered the mixing and subsequent combustion event.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Yue Wang, Hai-Wen Ge, Rolf D. Reitz
Resolution of droplet-scale processes occurring within engine sprays in multi-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations is not possible because impractically refined numerical meshes or time steps would be required. As a result, simulations that use coarse meshes and large time steps suffer from inaccurate predictions of mass, momentum and energy transfer between the spray drops and the combustion chamber gas, or poor prediction of droplet breakup and collision and coalescence processes. Several new spray models have been proposed to address these deficiencies, including use of an unsteady gas jet model to improve momentum transfer predictions in under-resolved regions of the spray, a vapor particle model to minimize numerical diffusion effects, and a Radius of Influence drop collision model to ensure consistent collision computations on different meshes. The present work combines these models with improved KH-RT models to improve the consistency of drop breakup predictions.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Jessica L. Brakora, Rolf D. Reitz
A numerical study was performed to compare the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), collectively termed NOx, resulting from biodiesel and diesel combustion in an internal combustion engine. It has been shown that biodiesel tends to increase NOx compared to diesel, and to-date, there is no widely accepted explanation. Many factors can lead to increased NOx formation and it was of interest to determine if fuel chemistry plays a significant role. Therefore, in order to isolate the fuel chemistry from mixing processes typical in a compression ignition engine, sprays were not considered in the present investigation. The current study compares the NOx formation of surrogates for biodiesel (as represented by methyl butanoate and n-heptane) and diesel (n-heptane) under completely homogeneous conditions. Combustion of each fuel was simulated using the Senkin code for both an adiabatic, constant volume reactor, and an adiabatic, single-zone HCCI engine model. The fuel chemistry is represented using an updated version of a mechanism that combines reduced mechanisms for methyl butanoate and n-heptane.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Patrick B. Dunbeck, Rolf D. Reitz
An experimental study was conducted on an air cooled high-speed, direct-injection diesel generator that investigated the use of gasoline in a dual fuel PCCI strategy. The single-speed generator used in the study has an effective compression ratio of 17 and runs at 3600 rev/min. Varying amounts of gasoline were introduced into the combustion chamber through a port injection system. The generator uses an all-mechanical diesel fuel injection system that has a fixed injection timing. The experiments explored variable intake temperatures and fuel split quantities to investigate different combustion phasing regimes. Results from the study showed low combustion efficiency at low load. Low load operation was also characterized by high levels of HC and CO (in excess of 20 g/kwh and 50 g/kwh respectively). Operation at 75% load was more efficient, and displayed three different combustion regimes that are possible with PIG (port injected gasoline) dual fuel PCCI. At full load, PIG operation provided vast improvements in the emissions of soot.
Technical Paper
2010-04-12
Reed M. Hanson, Sage L. Kokjohn, Derek A. Splitter, Rolf D. Reitz
This study investigates the potential of controlling premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion strategies by varying fuel reactivity. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline and early cycle, direct-injection of diesel fuel was used for combustion phasing control at a medium engine load of 9 bar net IMEP and was also found to be effective to prevent excessive rates of pressure rise. Parameters used in the experiments were guided from the KIVA-CHEMKIN code with a reduced primary reference fuel (PRF) mechanism including injection timings, fuel percentages, and intake valve closing (IVC) timings for dual-fuel PCCI combustion. The engine experiments were conducted with a conventional common rail injector (i.e., wide angle and large nozzle hole) and demonstrated control and versatility of dual-fuel PCCI combustion with the proper fuel blend, SOI and IVC timings. For example, at the 9 bar operating point, NOx and soot were 0.012 g/kW-hr and 0.008 g/kW-hr, respectively.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 151

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: