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Viewing 1 to 30 of 104162
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2109
Rodrigo Domingos, Daniel Silva
This paper outlines a three-dimensional computer model named AIPAC suitable for bleed-air ice protection system parametric studies in support of system design and optimization. This 3D simulation code was derived from HASPAC, which is a 2D anti-icing model developed at Wichita State University in 2010. AIPAC is based on the Finite Volumes Method and, similarly to HASPAC, combines a commercial Navier-Stokes flow solver with a Messinger model based thermodynamic analysis that applies internal and external flows heat transfer coefficients, pressure distribution, wall shear stress, etc, to compute wing leading edge skin temperatures, 3D runback flow distribution, and the location, extent and rate of icing. In addition, AIPAC was built using a transient formulation and with the capability of extruding a 3D surface mesh into a volumetric domain, so that “single-shot” ice shapes can be predicted (a more accurate multiple-step ice growth methodology is currently being developed).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2081
Hossein Habibi, Graham Edwards, Liang Cheng, Haitao Zheng, Adam Marks, Vassilios Kappatos, Cem Selcuk, Tat-Hean Gan
Wind turbines mounted on cold climate sites are subject to icing which could significantly influence the performance of turbine blades for harvesting wind energy. To alleviate this problem, a number of techniques have been developed and tested. The currently used methods are surface coating, antifreeze chemicals, electrical resistance heating, hot air circulation, pulse electrothermal de-icing, manual chip-off, etc. Almost all thermal de-ice methods demand a high level of power to operate. Also, the high temperature induced to the blade by the thermal techniques may pose a risk for the integrity of composite blades. A relatively new strategy used for ice protection systems is ultrasonic guided waves (vibrations of very short length wave) on which a few research projects have been recently accomplished. This method is well known for non-destructive testing applications in which the waves typically propagate between 20 kHz and 100 kHz for long-range ultrasonic testing.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2100
Yongsheng Lian, Yisen Guo
This paper investigated impingement of supercooled large droplets onto smooth solid surfaces to understand the mechanism of splashing and secondary droplets formation using a novel moment of fluid (MOF) method. Previous studies have established a splashing threshold, but the effect of ambient gas in liquid droplet splashing is not fully understood. Our numerical results of water droplet splashing with relatively low velocity were consistent with experimental results: splashing occurs at high pressure but not at low pressure. Our simulation revealed that a thin film was formed after the droplet contacted the solid surface. The thin film moved at a lower speed at the contact with the solid due to viscous effect while the film moved at a higher speed away from the solid. As a result, air was trapped under the film, making the film floating on the air. When the pressure was high, the air density was high hence the aerodynamic forces by the air on the thin film.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2129
Andrea Munzing, Stephane Catris
A lot of research work on icing scaling laws has been done during the last decades resulting in a today commonly accepted definition of similarity parameters and scaling laws. Those icing scaling laws have essentially been developed for fixed wing applications because airplane aerodynamic surfaces are too big to be tested in icing wind tunnels. This problem does not exist for helicopter blade profiles. However, the use of icing scaling laws is a very interesting feature in order to be able to predict ice shapes or icing performance penalty for a future helicopter still in development. Thanks to the long experience of Airbus Helicopters with icing tests a database of several real ice shapes on helicopter main and tail rotor blade sections is available. The comparison of the ice shapes obtained at the same icing similarity parameters allows the assessment of 2D icing scaling laws established for fixed wing aircrafts.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2128
Enrico Bellussi
This paper describes the AgustaWestland past and present experience in the use of US Army HISS flight test results in support to the civil ice clearance for rotorcrafts. The US Army HISS is a CH47D Chinook fitted with a spray bar system providing a cloud for in flight icing evaluation with large part of the rotor (or the fuselage) of the rotorcraft immersed during the flight. The HISS allows to have flight data with stable and partially selectable ice parameters for prolonged flight time, conditions extremely difficult to encounter during natural ice flights. AgustaWestland obtained for AW139 the clearance for flight into known icing conditions (FIPS) by EASA, FAA and TCCA in 2010 and by IAC in 2011. AW139 also obtained the clearance for flight into limited ice conditions (LIPS) by EASA in 2013. In both cases the results of the US Army HISS artificial icing trials have been successfully used to support the certification process.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2149
Caroline Laforte, Caroline Blackburn, Jean Perron
Ideally, an icephobic coating applied to ice-exposed surfaces appears to be an interesting solution to prevent ice build-up. Over the last decade, developments of efficient icephobic coatings were multiplied. Some materials that reduce ice adhesion have been developed from which the ice can be more easily shed, possibly even with existing forces such as wind, gravity and vibrations. This paper will depict icephobic coating performances of 262 different coatings and 11 grease type substrates tested over the past 10 years at the Anti-Icing Materials International Laboratory (AMIL). Since 2003, the icephobic performance is evaluated with two main test methods. A first test method was developed in regards to measuring the ice adhesion and its reduction. A second test was then developed to measure the ice accumulation reduction.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2199
Rui Cao, J Stuart Bolton
Experimental measurements of tire tread band vibration have provided direct evidence that higher order structural-acoustic modes exist in tires, not just the well-known fundamental mode. These modes display both circumferential and radial pressure variations. The theory governing these modes has thus been investigated. A brief recapitulation of the previously-presented coupled tire-acoustical model based on a tensioned membrane approach will be given, and then an improved tire-acoustical model with a ring-like shape will be introduced. In the latter model, the effects of flexural and circumferential stiffness are considered. This improved model accounts for propagating in-plane vibration in addition to the essentially structure-borne flexural wave and the essentially airborne longitudinal wave accounted for in the previous model. The longitudinal structure-borne wave “cuts on” at the tire’s circumferential ring frequency.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2216
Dong Chul Park, Eun Soo Jo, Seokgwan Hong, Michael Csakan
An important trend among vehicle NVH engineers is to produce the attractive engine sounds matching with a vehicle concept and engine performance. Recently customers have much more interests in their personal preferences and enjoying tuning their cars. The PESS(Personalized Engine Sound System) has been developed for making a unique and individual concept of a vehicle. The system helps customers make variety of engine sound in a single vehicle using active sound design technology. In this system, three different concept of engine sound has been defined-Dynamic, Sporty, and Extreme. Each of the engine sounds can be adjusted with a parameter that determines the timbre such as main orders, half orders, and high orders. In addition, the extent to the drivers stepping on the accelerator pedal has been used as a parameter to differ the sound response. An AVN application has been implemented that allows users to easily design those functions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2215
Thomas L. Lago
How to decrease noise and vibration exposure has been of interest for many years. Empirical data have verified that too high dose values can create multiple problems to a human body - often severe. Some years back, the European Machinery Directive has increased the responsibility for manufacturers and employers to make sure limits are complying with legislation. Classical technology often consists of passive solutions aiming at trying to cut back on noise and vibration levels. For low frequency, these methods are often lacking the needed performance especially if weight should be considered at the same time. A smart combination of passive and active techniques can make a real difference. Today, with possibilities for low cost and embedded electronics and the rapid development of new actuators, a vast range of applications are possible for this combined combat approach, with a financial advantage as well.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2213
John Van Baren
The accumulated damage that a product experiences in the field due to the variety of vibration stresses placed upon it will eventually cause failures in the product. The failure modes resulting from these dynamic stresses can be replicated in the laboratory and correlated to end use environment to validate target reliability requirements. This presentation will discuss which random profile is needed to simulate end use environment, how to combine multiple vibration environments into one, and how to use FDS to accelerate the test.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2218
Shuguang Zuo, Jun Zhang, xudong wu, jiajie HU, Guo Long
Title: Study on Active Noise Control of Blower in Fuel Cell Vehicle under Transient Conditions Authors: Zuo Shuguang, Zhang Jun, Wu Xudong, Hu Jiajie, Long Guo Abstract: Blower is one of the main noise sources of fuel cell vehicle. In this paper, a narrowband active noise control (ANC) model is established based on adaptive notch filter (ANF) to control the medium-high frequency noise produced by the blower. In actual application, the frequency of reference signal differs from the frequency of the noise signal inevitably. This difference is referred to as frequency mismatch (FM) which greatly degenerates the performance of the narrowband ANC algorithm. Under transient conditions, in order to reduce the FM of ANC for blower, a new Frequency Mismatch Filtered-Error Least Mean Square algorithm (FM-FELMS) is proposed to attenuate blower noise.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2228
Drivelines used in modern pickup trucks commonly employ universal joints. This type of joint is responsible for second driveshaft order vibrations in the vehicle. Large displacements of the joint connecting the driveline and the rear axle have a detrimental effect on vehicle NVH. As leaf springs are critical energy absorbing elements that connect to the powertrain, they are used to restrain large axle windup angles. One of the most common types of leaf springs in use today is the multi-stage parabolic leaf spring. A simple SAE 3-link approximation is adequate for preliminary studies but it has been found to be inadequate to study axle windup. A vast body of literature exists on modeling leaf springs using nonlinear FEA and multibody simulations. However, these methods require significant amount of component level detail and measured data. As such, these techniques are not applicable for quick sensitivity studies at design conception stage.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2222
Nikos Zafeiropoulos, Marco Ballatore PhD, Andy Moorhouse PhD, Andy Mackay
Road noise forces can excite different structural resonances of the vehicle hence a high number of sensors required for observing and separating all the vibrations that are coherent with the cabin noise. Current reference sensor selection methods for feedforward road noise control result to high number of sensors. Therefore there is a necessity for reducing the number of sensors without degrading the performance of an ANC system. In the past coherence function analysis has been found to be useful for optimising the sensor location. Thus, in this case coherence function mapping was performed between an array of vibration sensors and a microphone in order to identify the locations on the structure with highly correlated with road bands in the compartment. A vehicle with an advanced suspension system was used for applying the method and defining some locations as reference signals for feedforward active road noise control.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2223
Rolf Schirmacher
Active Noise Control (ANC) and Active Sound Design (ASD) have long been seen as emerging technologies. During recent years, however, they became quite mainstream for new vehicle and infotainment platforms within a broad range of OEMs. This paper presents the current state-of-the-art of production ANC and ASD systems, including the lessons learned during the last years of bringing the technology from the lab into vehicles. Based on this current status, critical elements for an even broader application of the technologies are identified and developments to overcome them are discussed. In addition, as the integration of these technologies with other in-vehicle systems is crucial for a commercially viable application, trends of future IVI systems are discussed and integration scenarios for next generation IVI systems are shown.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2230
Chatter vibrations are causing large monetary losses daily in industry. New materials have increased the challenges with harmful vibration levels. Since the vibrations, when observed as a final result, are chaotic and the vibration process nonlinear, it is a challenging task to deal with it. It is also a common “understanding” in the cutting industry that chatter is RPM (the rotational speed) dependent, since the behavior changes with RPM. Many attempts have been done over many years to mitigate and understand the vibrations. In our vast research on these topics, we have found that it is rewarding to classify the vibrations into categories, enabling a better understanding of its underlying physics and “source of vibrations,” and thus also the formulation of a possible remedy. An analysis approach has been developed where vibrations are analyzed and categorized and a GO/NOGO indicator is telling if the machine has the “right type of vibrations.”
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2242
Ling Zheng, Zhanpeng Fang
The design optimization of interior noise in vehicle is addressed to reduce interior noise and improve customer satisfaction in this paper. The structural-acoustic model is established and the response of sound pressure in frequency domain is predicted by using finite element method. The minimization of sound pressure inside cabins depends on body structure and the thickness for each panel. The panel participation analysis is carried out to find out the key panels as design variables and improve the efficiency of optimization computation. Response Surface Method (RSM) is proposed and utilized to optimize the vibro-acoustic properties of body structure instead of complex structural-acoustic coupling finite element model. The accuracy of the proposed RSM is evaluated and discussed. Structural-acoustic problem is approximated by a series of quadratic polynomial using RSM. Geometric optimization problem of panels is described and solved to minimize the interior noise in vehicle.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2244
Ulhas Dilipraj Mohite, Niket Bhatia, Prashant Bhavsar
Noise radiated from motorcycle engine is gaining significance not only to meet regulations but also to fulfil customer demands of quiet products. In IC engines, combustion pressure is one of the major excitations which is transmitted through powertrain to the casings and radiate noise. Early identification and correction of the casing critical areas contributing to noise will lead to substantial cost and development time reduction. In this paper the approach to predict engine noise under combustion forces is presented. This Methodology is divided into three stages: 1. Multi body dynamic (MBD) Simulation to determine excitation forces 2. Vibration analysis of engine under combustion load 3. Acoustic analysis of engine to predict Sound Pressure Level (SPL). Important parts of motorcycle engine with single cylinder are considered as flexible bodies for MBD simulation.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2240
Gong Cheng, David W. Herrin
The theory of patch (or panel) contribution analysis is first reviewed and then applied to a motorcycle engine on a test stand. The approach is used to predict the sound pressure in the far field and the contribution from different engine components to the sound pressure at a point. First, the engine is divided into a number of patches. The transfer function between the sound pressure in the field and the volume velocity of a patch is determined by taking advantage of vibro-acoustic reciprocity. An inexpensive monopole source is placed at the receiver point and the sound pressure is measured at the center of each patch. With the engine idling, a P-U probe was used to measure particle velocity and sound intensity simultaneously on each patch. The contribution from each patch to the target point is the multiplication of the transfer function and the volume velocity, which can be calculated from particle velocity or sound intensity. There were two target points considered.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2283
Andrew Smith
iOS devices, including iPhones and iPads, are being used increasingly for professional and scientific applications. Using an iOS device for noise & vibration measurements is an application with many advantages, given its small size, availability, cost, and ease of operation. We have created a system for measuring noise level, logging noise over time, doing FFT frequency analysis of sound, and measuring speech intelligibility using iPhones and iPads as the host device. This provides a portable, cost-effective, and easy to deploy test and measurement system. The main area of concern for the performance of the system is the transducer, which in the case of the microphone was designed for the speech applications, rather than wide-band acoustical analysis, and for the gyroscope, for recognizing gross movement.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2277
Vishal Vaidya, Pravin Hujare
Recently quietness has become an important quality parameter for automotive vehicles and as a result various improvements have been brought to reduce noise at system and vehicle level. Due to stringent noise emission norms on automotive vehicles and increasing desire of quieter in-cab performance by users, reduction of air intake noise tends to be an area of explanation. Air intake noise, which was relatively considered as a minor source of noise in the past, is now gaining importance. This paper emphasizes the sound pressure level reduction through the increase in transmission loss at an air intake system. The intake noise of an automobile induced by firing of an engine accompanies acoustic resonance of ducts of an intake system. Conventionally, the adoption of an integrated type resonator was one of possible ways to eliminate the booming noise due to acoustic resonances of air ducts.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2293
Manchi Venkateswara Rao, S Nataraja Moorthy, Prasath Raghavendran
Tactile vibration during vehicle key on/off is one of the critical factors contributing to the customer perceived quality of the vehicle. Minimization of the powertrain transient vibration in operating conditions such as key on/off, tip in/out and engagement/disengagement of engine in hybrid vehicles must be addressed carefully in the vehicle refinement stage. Source of start/stop vibration depends on many factors like engine cranking, engine rpm at which the combustion process starts and rate of engine rpm rise etc. The transfer path consists of elastomeric mounts of powertrain and vehicle structure from mounts to tactile response location. In this paper, the contribution of rigid body motion of powertrain of a front wheel drive vehicle during key on/off is analyzed in both frequency and time domain. The signal is analyzed in frequency domain by using Fast Fourier Transform, Short Time Fourier Transform and Wavelet Analysis. The merits and demerits of each method are illustrated.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2295
Aniket Parbat, Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy
The definition of vehicle and powertrain level targets is one of the first tasks toward establishing where a vehicle will reside with respect to the current or future state of industry. Target setting at the vehicle level is relatively straightforward. Realization of these targets relies on a combination of competitive powertrain (source) and vehicle (path) NVH performance. Assessment of vehicle NVH performance (sensitivity) is well understood, and can be accomplished through determination of customer interface response to measured excitations at the source input locations. However, definition of powertrain source targets can be more difficult, particularly if powertrain level data (as acquired in a hemi-anechoic powertrain test cell) is not available. In addition to powertrain source noise and vibration levels, methods have been developed for quantification of powertrain radiated sound quality issues which can propagate to the vehicle.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2298
Stephen Chittick, Mark Swindell, Samir Raorane
As part of the long-term business strategy Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) has designed and developed a new family of advanced, highly efficient engines for future models. The all-new Ingenium family of inline 4 cylinder engines will increase JLR's capability to offer high performance engines with class-leading levels of refinement, whilst ensuring continued significant reductions in vehicle emissions. This paper details the NVH development of the lead engine, a 2.0 litre common rail turbo diesel. The task from the outset of this new programme was to reduce the mass of the engine by 21.5kg, whilst also improving the structural attenuation by 5 dB in comparison to the outgoing engine. Improving the structural attenuation by 5 dB was not only a key enabler in reducing combustion noise, but also helped to achieve a certified CO2 performance of 99 g/km in the all-new Jaguar XE model, by allowing more scope for increasing cylinder pressure forcing without compromising NVH.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2299
Dhanesh Purekar
In comparison to medium duty and heavy duty diesel engines, NVH development of light duty diesel engines requires significant collaboration with the OEM. Typically, competitive benchmark studies and customer expectations define the NVH targets at the vehicle and subsequently cascaded down at the powertrain level. For engine manufacturing companies like Cummins, it is imperative to work closely with OEM to deliver on the NVH expectations. In certain situations, engine level NVH targets needs to be demonstrated in the OEM or 3rd party acoustic test facility for contract approvals. However, this is a difficult task to accomplish, considering the differences between acoustic test facilities and hardware, instrumentation, etc. In addition, engine itself is a big contributor to the noise variation. This technical paper documents one such case study conducted on a standalone light duty diesel engine in three different acoustic test facilities.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2288
Abdelkrim Zouani, Joseph Stout, Salah Hanim, Changshen Gan, Gabriela Dziubinschi, William Baldwin, Zhi fu
A new turbocharged 60◦ 2.7L V6 gasoline engine has been developed by Ford Motor Company for both the pickup truck and car applications. This engine was code named “Nano” due to its compact size and features a CGI cylinder block, an Aluminum ladder, an integrated exhaust manifold and twin turbochargers. The goal of this engine is to deliver 120HP/L, ULEV70 emission, fuel efficiency improvements and leadership level NVH. This paper describes the upfront design and optimization process used for the NVH development of this engine; it will discuss the critical NVH design features and the final results relative to the benchmarks.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2287
Yaqiong Deng, Xiandi Zeng
Among the lower frequency vehicle NVH problems, booming noise is one of the most concerned issues. There are all kinds of booming noises from different driving conditions such as idling, driving away, and driving at lower speed on coarse road. In order for a vehicle to avoid those booming noises, the vehicle has to be designed to have the right structures and right counter -measures for all conditions possible for booming noise. One of the most common booming noise sources is the torsional vibration of the powertrain and driveline for rear-wheel drive and four-wheel drive vehicle. The solutions for this problem are either to use a torsional dynamic absorber or to use a lower stiffness clutch. Both solutions require the modal frequency of the torsioanal vibration of the powertrain and driveline. At early design stages, vehicle prototype is not available for measuring this frequency. Analytical method is usually used to calculate this frequency.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2289
Joseph L. Stout, Vincent Solferino, Simon Antonov
Powerplant NVH decisions are sometimes made looking only at how the change impacts either the source radiated noise level or the source vibration. Depending on the Engine Configuration, those can be good approximations, but they can also be very misleading. By combining both noise sources into a Vehicle Equivalent noise level a much better analysis can be made of the impact of the design on the Customer perceived loudness. This paper will investigate several different senarios and identify how the airborne and the structureborne paths combine for I4, V6 and V8 engine configurations. Similar relationships will be shown for path as well as the source contributions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2076
Caroline Laforte, Neal Wesley, Marc Mario Tremblay
In North America, about ten million kilograms of runway deicers are applied on airport runways to ensure safe takeoffs and landings of aircraft in adverse conditions. Although some of the chemicals are recovered, much of them are dispersed through aviation operations to airport’s surrounding environment. Little focus has been given into assessing and determining optimal quantities of deicers to be used on runways, that at the same time retain a high degree of safety, while reducing risks to the environment and improving airport efficiencies. Improved deicer performance tests would allow for the development of more environmentally sustainable deicers, through their improved performance. A better assessment of their deicing and anti-icing performance along with their degree of skid resistance on runway pavement, will help in the development of the next generation of runway de/anti-icing chemicals to ensure improved sustainable and safe aircraft takeoffs and landings.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2331
Alexander Schell, Vincent Cotoni
Aero-vibro-acoustic prediction of interior noise associated with exterior flow requires accurate predictions of both fluctuating surface pressures across the exterior of a vehicle and efficient models of the vibro-acoustic transmission of these surfaces pressures to the interior of a vehicle. The frequency range of interest varies depending on the region and source of interest. For noise transmitted through a sideglass the frequency range of interest is typically from 1-5kHz. The vibro-acoustic methods used to describe noise and vibration transmission also depend on the frequency range of interest. At higher frequencies methods like statistical energy analysis (SEA) are particularly well suited for describing the response of a trimmed cabin due to the short wavelength response of the interior acoustic space and sound package. An accurate prediction of fluctuating surface pressures also requires an accurate model of the flow over the exterior of the vehicle.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2338
Dong Guo, Quan Shi, Peng Yi
In-vehicle noise is composed of a variety of tonal (frequency-related) components and the tonal components play an important role in the improvement of interior vehicle sound quality. Much research has been focused on the suppression of sound pressure level and achieved certain positive effects. However, in some operating conditions, customers still perceive the tonal components and complain about the vehicle quality even the sound pressure level is relatively low. Therefore, a better understanding of how tonal components are perceived is necessary for automotive designers. To do so, psychoacoustics results about human hearing mechanism to tonal components are comprehensively summed in this study: human hearing response to pure tone, two tones and multiple tones. Then, well-controlled testing stimuli were generated and subjective annoyance testing was conducted. The results show agreement with former researchers’ findings.
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