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Viewing 1 to 30 of 107205
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1803
Hannes Frank, Claus-Dieter Munz
Avoiding narrowband components in the acoustic spectrum is one of the most critical objectives in the automotive aeroacoustic optimization process. The underlying physical mechanisms are not completely understood. In a preceding numerical and experimental investigation, we performed large eddy simulations of an early-development stage realistic side-view mirror, where tonal noise was captured and the principle mechanisms were identified. In this contribution, we present simulations on a simplified two-dimensional geometry that is based on these findings. It is shown that the basic flow topology relevant for tonal noise generation on the original side-view mirror as well as the tonal noise source is reproduced in the 2D case. Furthermore, we present comparisons with measurements and the necessity and influence of a splitter plate downstream of the 2D body to avoid large scale vortex shedding.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1805
Florian Zenger, Clemens Junger, Manfred Kaltenbacher, Stefan Becker
Abstract A low pressure axial fan for benchmarking numerical methods in the field of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The generic fan for this benchmark is a typical fan to be used in commercial applications. The design procedure was according to the blade element theory for low solidity fans. A wide range of experimental data is available, including aerodynamic performance of the fan (fan characteristic curve), fluid mechanical quantities on the pressure and suction side from laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements, wall pressure fluctuations in the gap region and sound characteristics on the suction side from sound power and microphone array measurements. The experimental setups are described in detail, as to ease reproducibility of measurement positions. This offers the opportunity of validating aerodynamic and aeroacoustic quantities, obtained from different numerical tools and procedures.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1832
Ramakrishna Kamath
Intermediate shaft assembly is used to connect steering gear to the steering wheel. The primary function of the intermediate shaft is to transfer torsional loads. There is a high probability of noise propagating through the Intermediate shaft to the driver. The current standard for measuring the noise is by performing vehicle level subjective evaluations. If improperly clamped at either of the yokes, a sudden change in the direction of the torsional load on the Intermediate shaft can generate a displeasing noise. Noise can also be generated from the constant velocity joint. Intermediate shaft noise can be measured using a microphone or can be correlated to acceleration values. The benefit of measuring the acceleration over sound pressure level is the reduction of complexity of the test environment and test set up. The nature of the noise in question requires the filtering of low frequency data. This paper presents a new test procedure that has been developed by General Motors.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1807
Olga Roditcheva, Lennart Carl Lofdahl, Simone Sebben, Pär Harling cEng, Holger Bernhardsson
Abstract This paper presents an experimental study of aeroacoustical sound sources generated by the turbulent flow around the side mirror of a Volvo V70. Measurements were carried out at the Volvo Cars aerodynamical wind tunnel (PVT) and at the aeroacoustical wind tunnel of Stuttgart University (FKFS). Several different measurement techniques were applied in both tunnels and the results were compared to each other. The configurations considered here were: side mirror with a cord and without the cord. The results discussed in this paper include intensity probe measurements in the flow around the side mirror, sound source localization with beamforming technique using a three-dimensional spherical array as well as standard measurements inside the car with an artificial head. This experimental study focused on understanding the differences between testing at the PVT and FKFS.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1809
Alexander Schell, Vincent Cotoni
Abstract Prediction of flow induced noise in the interior of a passenger car requires accurate representations of both fluctuating surface pressures across the exterior of the vehicle and efficient models of the vibro-acoustic transmission of these surface pressures to the driver’s ear. In this paper, aeroacoustic and vibro-acoustic methods are combined in order to perform an aero-vibro-acoustic analysis of a Mercedes-Benz A-class. The exterior aero-acoustic method consists of a time domain incompressible Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) and an acoustic wave equation. The method is extended in this paper to account for convection effects when modelling the exterior sound propagation. The interior vibro-acoustic model consists of a frequency domain Finite Element (FE) model of the side glass combined with a generalized Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model of the interior cabin.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1812
Saad Bennouna, Solène Moreau, Jean Michel Ville, Olivier Cheriaux
Abstract The noise radiated inside the car cabin depends on many sources such as the embedded equipments like the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) module. An HVAC is a compact and complex system composed of several elements: blower, flaps, thermal exchangers, ducts… Air provided by an HVAC is blown by a blower passing through different components and then distributed to car cabin areas. Interactions between airflow and the HVAC fixed components generate noises that emerge in the car cabin. CEVAS project, managed by the automotive equipment manufacturer Valeo, is aiming to develop a prediction tool which will provide HVAC noise spectrum and sound quality data. The tool is based, in particular, on aeroacoustic characterization of individual elements and associations of elements.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1811
Anders Rynell, Gunilla Efraimsson, Mattias Chevalier, Mats Abom
Abstract To obtain realistic noise characteristics from CAA studies of subsonic fans, it is important to prescribe properly constructed turbulent inflow statistics. This is frequently omitted; instead it is assumed that the stochastic characteristics of turbulence, absent at the initial stage, progressively develops as the rotor inflicts the flow field over time and hence that the sound generating mechanism governed by surface pressure fluctuations are asymptotically accounted for. That assumption violates the actual interplay taking place between an ingested flow field and the surface pressure fluctuations exerted by the blades producing noise. The aim of the present study is to examine the coupling effect between synthetically ingested turbulence to sound produced from a subsonic ducted fan. The steady state inflow parameters are mapped from a precursor RANS simulation onto the inflow boundaries of a reduced domain to limit the computational cost.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1813
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza
Abstract The characteristics of the intake system affect both engine power output and gas-dynamic noise emissions. The latter is particularly true in downsized VVA engines, where a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves is realized, due to the intake line de-throttling at part-load. For this engine architecture, a refined air-box design is hence requested. In this work, the Transmission Loss (TL) of the intake air-box of a commercial VVA engine is numerically computed through a 3D FEM approach. Results are compared with experimental data, showing a very good correlation. The validated model is then coupled to an external optimizer (ModeFRONTIERTM) to increase the TL parameter in a prefixed frequency range. The improvement of the acoustic attenuation is attained through a shape deformation of the inner structure of the base device, taking into account constraints related to the device installation inside the engine bay.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1817
Juergen Veit, Paco Langjahr, Stephan Brandl, Bernhard Graf
Abstract Due to more challenging future emission legislations and the trend towards downsizing, the number of turbocharged (TC) engines, especially petrol engines, is steadily increasing. The usage of TC has high risk to cause different noise phenomena apparent in the vehicle interior which are often perceived as annoying for the passengers. In order to further improve consideration of TC topics in the development, objective judgment and monitoring of TC noise issues is of high importance. Therefore, objective parameters and corresponding tools that are especially focusing on TC noise phenomena have to be developed. One main target of these tools is to deliver an objective TC assessment in an efficient way and with minimum additional effort. Application of the criteria presented in this publication therefore allows acoustic engineers to judge the NVH behavior and annoyance of the TC with respect to its vehicle interior noise contribution.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1816
Heiki Tiikoja, Fabio Auriemma, Jüri Lavrentjev
Abstract In this paper the propagation of acoustic plane waves in turbulent, fully developed flow is studied by means of an experimental investigation carried out in a straight, smooth-walled duct. The presence of a coherent perturbation, such as an acoustic wave in a turbulent confined flow, generates the oscillation of the wall shear stress. In this circumstance a shear wave is excited and superimposed on the sound wave. The turbulent shear stress is modulated by the shear wave and the wall shear stress is strongly affected by the turbulence. From the experimental point of view, it results in a measured damping strictly connected to the ratio between the thickness of the acoustic sublayer, which is frequency dependent, and the thickness of the viscous sublayer of the turbulent mean flow, the last one being dependent on the Mach number. By reducing the turbulence, the viscous sublayer thickness increases and the wave propagation is mainly dominated by convective effects.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1819
Antonio J. Torregrosa, Alberto Broatch, Vincent Raimbault, Jerome Migaud
Abstract Intake noise has become one the main concerns in the design of highly-supercharged downsized engines, which are expected to play a significant role in the upcoming years. Apart from the low frequencies associated with engine breathing, in these engines other frequency bands are also relevant which are related to the turbocharger operation, and which may radiate from the high-pressure side from the compressor outlet to the charge air cooler. Medium frequencies may be controlled with the use of different typologies of resonators, but these are not so effective for relatively high frequencies. In this paper, the potential of the use of multi-layer porous materials to control those high frequencies is explored. The material sheets are located in the side chamber of an otherwise conventional resonator, thus providing a compact, lightweight and convenient arrangement.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1818
Raimo Kabral, Lin Du, Mats Abom, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract The concept of IC engine downsizing is a well-adapted industry standard, enabling better fuel conversion efficiency and the reduction of tailpipe emissions. This is achieved by utilizing different type of superchargers. As a consequence, the additional charger noise emission, at the IC engine inlet, can become a problem. In order to address such problem, the authors of this work have recently proposed a novel dissipative silencer for effective and robust noise control of the compressor. Essentially, it realizes an optimal flow channel impedance, referred to as the Cremer impedance. This is achieved by means of a straight flow channel with a locally reacting wall consisting of air cavities covered by an acoustic resistance, e.g., a micro-perforated panel (MPP). In this paper, an improved optimization method of this silencer is presented. The classical Cremer impedance model is modified to account for mean flow dependence of the optimal wave number.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1822
Drasko Masovic, Franz Zotter, Eugene Nijman, Jan Rejlek, Robert Höldrich
Abstract Radiation of sound from an open pipe with a hot mean flow presents one of the classic problems of acoustics in inhomogeneous media. The problem has been especially brought into focus in the last several decades, in the context of noise control of vehicle exhaust systems and jet engines. However, the reports on the measurements of the radiated sound field are still rare and scattered over different values of subsonic and supersonic flow speeds, cold and hot jets, as well as different sound frequency ranges. This paper focuses on low Mach number values of the mean flow speed and low frequencies of the incident (plane) sound waves inside an unflanged cylindrical pipe with a straight cut. It presents the results of the far-field radiation pattern measurements and compares them with an existing analytical model from the literature. The mean flow inside the pipe reached Mach number values up to 0.25 and temperature up to 300°C.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1823
Andrea Grosso, Martin Lohrmann
Abstract Operational Transfer Path Analysis (OTPA) assess the possible ways of energy to transfer from the various sources of excitation to a given target location. Applied to vehicle engineering, the OTPA provides indication about dominant sources and path contributions. However, it can only analyze the actual system under test and cannot predict if an improvement can be achieved by applying a counter measure. A careful interpretation of the measurement results is therefore necessary in order to define an effective engineering solution strategy. In this paper the RMA (Response Modification Analysis) technique is used to facilitate a sensitivity analysis, gaining insight whether energy is likely to be rerouted. This gives additional understanding of OTPA results, indicating which counter measure is most effective. The RMA is applied to a real measurement scenario, showing the advantage of the combination of OTPA with RMA for correctly identifying the relevant sources and paths.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1820
Mikael Karlsson, Magnus Knutsson, Mats Abom
Abstract This work explores how fluid driven whistles in complex automotive intake and exhaust systems can be predicted using computationally affordable tools. Whistles associated with unsteady shear layers (created over for example side branches or perforates in resonators) are studied using vortex sound theory; vorticity in the shear layer interacts with the acoustic field while being convected across the orifice. If the travel time of a hydrodynamic disturbance over the orifice reasonably matches a multiple of the acoustic period of an acoustic feedback system, energy is transferred from the flow field to the acoustic field resulting in a whistle. The actual amplitude of the whistle is set by non-linear saturation phenomena and cannot be predicted here, but the frequency and relative strength can be found. For this not only the mean flow and acoustic fields needs to be characterized separately, but also the interaction of the two.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1821
Lin Du, Mats Abom, Mikael Karlsson, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract To tune the acoustics of intake systems resonators are often used. A problem with this solution is that the performance of these resonators can be affected a lot by flow. First, for low frequencies (Strouhal-numbers) the acoustic induced vorticity across a resonator inlet opening will create damping, which can reduce the efficiency. Secondly, the vorticity across the opening can also change the end-correction (added mass) for the resonator, which can modify the resonance frequency. However, the largest problem that can occur is whistling. This happens since the vortex-sound interaction across a resonator opening for certain Strouhal-numbers will amplify incoming sound waves. A whistling can then be created if this amplified sound forms a feedback loop, e.g., via reflections from system boundaries or the resonator. To analyse this kind of problem it is necessary to have a model that allows for both sound and vorticity and their interaction.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1830
Denis Blanchet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract This paper presents new advances in predicting wind noise contribution to interior SPL in the framework of the Wind Noise German Working Group composed of Audi, Daimler, Porsche and VW. In particular, a new approach was developed that allows to fully describe the wind noise source using CFD generated surface pressure distribution and its cross-correlation function and apply this source on an SEA side glass. This new method removes the need to use a diffuse acoustic field or several plane waves with various incidence angle to approximate the correct acoustics source character to apply on the SEA side glass. This new approach results are compared with results previously published which use more deterministic methods to represent the side glass and the interior of a vehicle.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1834
Florian Fink, Gregor Koners
Abstract This paper describes the prediction process of wheel forces and moments via indirect transfer path analysis, followed by an analysis of the influence of wheel variants and suspension modifications. It proposes a method to calculate transmission of noise to the vehicle interior where wheel forces and especially moments were taken into account. The calculation is based on an indirect transfer path analysis with geometrical modifications of the frequency response functions. To generate high quality broadband results, this paper also points out some of the main clearance cutting criteria. The method has been successfully implemented to show the influence of wheel tire combinations as well as the influence of suspension modifications. Case studies have been performed and will be presented in this paper. Operational noise and vibration measurements have been carried out on Daimler NVH test tracks. The frequency response functions were estimated in an acoustic laboratory.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1825
Jung-Han Woo, Da-Young Kim, Jeong-Guon Ih
Abstract To hear the powerful and spectrally rich sound in a car is costly, because the usual car audio system adopts small loudspeakers. Also, the available positions of the loudspeakers are limited, that may cause the reactive effect from the backing cavity and the sound distortion. In this work, a part of the roof panel of a passenger car is controlled by array actuators to convert the specified large area to be a woofer. An analogous concept of the acoustic holography is employed to be projected as the basic concept of an inverse rendering for achieving a desired vibration field. The vibration of the radiating zone is controlled to be in a uniform phase, and the other parts outside it are to be made a no-change zone in vibration. The latter becomes a baffle for the woofer, and the backing cavity is virtually infinite if the sound radiation into the passenger cabin is only of concern.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1839
Emar Vegt
Abstract The quiet nature of hybrid and electric vehicles has triggered developments in research, vehicle manufacturing and legal requirements. Currently, three countries require fitting an Approaching Vehicle Alerting System (AVAS) to every new car capable of driving without a combustion engine. Various other geographical areas and groups are in the process of specifying new legal requirements. In this paper, the design challenges in the on-going process of designing the sound for quiet cars are discussed. A proposal is issued on how to achieve the optimum combination of safety, environmental noise, subjective sound character and technical realisation in an iterative sound design process. The proposed sound consists of two layers: the first layer contains tonal components with their pitch rising along with vehicle speed in order to ensure recognisability and an indication of speed.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1837
Stephan Brandl, Werner Biermayer, Bernhard Graf, Thomas Resch
Abstract Due to more stringent emission regulation, especially plug-in hybrid vehicles have an increased attractiveness for OEMs to reduce OEM’s CO2 fleet emission. Generally, hybrid vehicles have a much higher complexity than conventional vehicles. This gives an additional degree of freedom for the development but also increases the number of potential NVH topics dramatically. Therefore, the role of frontloading and early prototype testing is getting even higher importance than in standard developments. Current hybrid vehicles on the market are mainly ICE vehicles with electric boosting or starting functionality only. This however will not be sufficient to fulfill the OEM’s CO2 fleet emission requirements. Future hybrid vehicles will have much higher electrical capabilities and drive much more in pure electric modes. Therefore, the more frequent change between the different driving modes and the related mode transitions will lead to a more complex interior NVH situation.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1841
Peter R. Hooper
Powertrain system duplication for hybrid electric vehicles and range-extenders presents serious cost challenges. Cost increase can be mitigated by reducing the number of cylinders but this usually has a negative impact on noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) of the vehicle system. This paper considers a novel form of two-stroke cycle engine offering potential for low emissions, reduced production cost and high potential vehicle efficiency. The engine uses segregated pump charging via the use of stepped pistons offering potential for low emissions. Installation as a power plant for automotive hybrid electric vehicles or as a range-extender for electric vehicles could present a low mass solution addressing the drive for vehicle fleet CO2 reduction. Operation on the two-stroke cycle enables NVH advantages over comparable four-stroke cycle units, however the durability of conventional crankcase scavenged engines can present significant challenges.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1838
Janko Slavic, Matija Javorski, Janez Luznar, Gregor Cepon, Miha Boltezar
Abstract In electric motors the working torque results from the magnetic forces (due to the magnetic field). The magnetic forces are also a direct source of structural excitation; further, the magnetic field is an indirect source of structural excitation in the form of magnetostriction. In the last decade other sources of structural excitation (e.g. mechanical imbalance, natural dynamics of the electric motor) have been widely researched and are well understood. On the other hand, the excitation due to the magnetic forces and magnetostriction is gaining interest in the last period; especially in the field of auto-mobility. Due to the broadband properties of the magnetic field (e.g. Pulse-Width-Modulation(PWM), multi-harmonic excitation), the direct structural excitation in the form of magnetic forces is also broadband.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1845
Xueji Zhang, ZhongZhe Dong, Martin Hromcik, Kristian Hengster-Movric, Cassio Faria, Herman D. Van der Auweraer, Wim Desmet
Active vibration reduction for lightweight structures has attracted more and more attention in automotive industries. In this paper, reduced-order controllers are designed based on H∞ techniques to realize vibration reduction. A finite element model of piezo-based smart structure is constructed from which a nominal model containing 5 modes and validation model containing 10 modes are extracted. A mixed-sensitivity robust H∞ controller is firstly designed based on the nominal structural model. Considering the ease of controller deployment, an order reduction for the controller is then exploited using balanced truncation method. The effectiveness of the reduced-order controller is finally verified on the validation model via system simulations.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1847
Olivier Robin, Celse Kafui Amedin, Alain Berry, Noureddine Atalla, Olivier Doutres, Franck Sgard
A method for estimating the sound absorption coefficient of a material under a synthesized Diffuse Acoustic Field was recently proposed, as an alternative to classical sound absorption measurements in reverberant rooms (Robin O., Berry A., Doutres O., Atalla N., ‘Measurement of the absorption coefficient of absorbing materials under a synthesized diffuse acoustic field’, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 136 (1) EL13-EL19, 2014). Using sound field reproduction approaches and a synthetic array of acoustic monopoles facing the material, estimation of the sound absorption coefficient under a reproduced Diffuse Acoustic Field in a hemi-anechoic room was shown to be feasible. The method was successfully tested on a few samples of melamine foam of close thicknesses and areas, but the influence of several parameters such as the source height, or the samples dimensions together with the nature of the porous material was not fully investigated.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1843
Jan Krueger, Viktor Koch, Ralf Hoelsch
Abstract Over the past few years, the measurement procedure for the pass-by noise emission of vehicles was changed and new limit values have been set by the European Parliament which will come into force within the next few years. Moreover, also the limits for chemical emissions such as NOx, particulates and CO2 have been lowered dramatically and will continue to be lowered according to a roadmap decided not only in Europe but also in other markets throughout the world. This will have an enormous impact on the design of future passenger cars and in particular on their powertrains. Downsizing, downspeeding, forced induction, and hybridization are among the most common general technology trends to keep up with these challenges. However, most of these fuel saving and cleaner technologies also have negative acoustic side effects.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1842
Ahmed Abbad
Abstract A Helmholtz resonator is a passive acoustic resonator used to control a single frequency resulting from the cavity volume and the resonator neck size. The main purpose of work in progress is to propose to investigate numerically some strategies allowing real-time tunability of the Helmholtz resonator in order to provide a wider bandwidth and hence enhance noise attenuation. Two concepts will be developed, both based on the use of electroactive polymer (EAP) membranes. These materials exhibit a change of shape when stimulated by an electric field. The first concept consists in replacing the resonator rigid back plate by an EAP material membrane, while on the second one, the membrane is located in front of the resonator. Numerical investigations are performed using several kinds of a passive EAPs material membranes in order to determine the practical potential of these concepts.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1848
Jean-Loup Christen, Mohamed Ichchou, Olivier Bareille, Bernard Troclet
Abstract The problem of noise transmission through a structure into a cavity appears in many practical applications, especially in the automotive, aeronautic and space industries. In the mean time, there is a trend towards an increasing use of composite materials to reduce the weight of the structures. Since these materials usually offer poor sound insulation properties, it is necessary to add noise control treatments. They usually involve poroelastic materials, such as foams or mineral wools, whose behaviour depends on many parameters. Some of these parameters may vary in rather broad ranges, either because of measurement uncertainties or because their values have not been fixed yet in the design process. In order to efficiently design sound protections, performing a sensitivity analysis can be interesting to identify which parameters have the most influence on the relevant vibroacoustic indicators and concentrate the design effort on them.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1849
Arnaud Caillet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract The need for the industry to simulate and optimize the acoustic trim parts has increased during the last decade. There are many approaches to integrate the effect of an acoustic trim in a finite element model. These approaches can be very simple and empirical like the classical non-structural mass (NSM) combined to a high acoustic damping value in the receiver cavity to much more detailed and complex approach like the Poro-Elastic Materials (PEM) method using the Biot parameters. The objective of this paper is to identify which approach is the most appropriate in given situations. This article will first make a review of the theory behind the different methods (NSM, Impedances, Transfer Matrix Method, PEM). Each of them will be investigated for the different typical trim families used in the automotive industry: absorber, spring/mass, spring/mass/absorber.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1851
Arnaud Duval, Minh Tan Hoang, Valérie Marcel, Ludovic Dejaeger
Abstract The noise treatments weight reduction strategy, which consists in combining broadband absorption and insulation acoustic properties in order to reduce the weight of barriers, depends strongly on surface to volume ratio of the absorbing layers in the reception cavity. Indeed, lightweight technologies like the now classical Absorber /Barrier /Absorber layup are extremely efficient behind the Instrument Panel of a vehicle, but most of the time disappointing when applied as floor insulator behind the carpet. This work aims at showing that a minimum of 20 mm equivalent “shoddy” standard cotton felt absorption is requested for a floor carpet insulator, in order to be able to reduce the weight of barriers. This means that a pure absorbing system that would destroy completely the insulation properties and slopes can only work, if the noise sources are extremely low in this specific area, which is seldom the case even at the rear footwells location.
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