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Viewing 1 to 6 of 6
2009-10-01
Technical Paper
2009-01-3080
Gursaran D. Mathur
Experimental tests were conducted to monitor cabin carbon dioxide concentrations by driving the vehicle in Farmington Hills & Detroit area. The number of occupants, vehicle speed, and type of driving (local traffic and highway conditions) are the major variables for this study. The tests were conducted during winter season with HVAC unit operating in foot and defrost modes. For foot and defrost modes, there are some noticeable differences in the magnitudes of the carbon dioxide concentration due to the airflow rates and mixing of air within the cabin. The measured peak cabin carbon dioxide levels in foot and defrost modes were found to be of similar magnitudes. However, the initial build-up rates of cabin carbon dioxide for defrost modes were higher in defrost modes in comparison to the foot mode. This is due to different mechanism of mixing of air within the cabin. This is explained in details in the paper.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0829
Gursaran D. Mathur
The vehicle's AC system should not be operated in recirculation mode for extended periods of time due to build up of CO2 inside the vehicle cabin. This is the CO2 that is exhaled by the occupants of the vehicle. This CO2 is then inhaled by the occupants that goes into their blood streams which results in a negative impact on health. This becomes critical when a number of people are sitting inside the vehicle. Field tests were conducted on a MY 2003 vehicle in recirculation mode to monitor the build-up of the CO2 concentration inside the cabin as a function of number of occupants, vehicle speed and ambient temperatures. The vehicle was driven in Detroit Metro area in city and highway traffic conditions. Based on this investigation it is determined that the cabin concentration levels reaches ASHRAE (Standard 62-1999) specified magnitudes in first 5 minutes of driving with only one occupant in the vehicle.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0539
Gursaran D. Mathur
In a recent study the author (Mathur, 2006) had conducted an experimental study by monitoring and collecting the tailpipe emissions (NOx, CO, HC) of the exhaust gases for automobiles, buses, and trucks at peak and off-peak hours for major roads and highways in Detroit metropolitan area. The current study focuses on the influence of the vehicle speed and ambient temperature on the amount of CO, HC and NOx entering into the vehicles' cabin in a controlled test environment. These tests have been conducted at CalsonicKansei North America's (CKNA) wind tunnel. Two sensors were installed in the vehicle to monitor outside and inside concentration of the above gases. The tests were conducted at a number of vehicle speeds to determine the influence on the amount of the gases entering into the cabin due to the response time of the actuator for the blower unit's air intake door.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0269
Gursaran D. Mathur
The current investigation is focused on monitoring and collecting the tailpipe emissions (NOx, CO, HC) of the exhaust gases for automobiles, buses, and trucks. The experimental data has been collected to record the peak and off peak hour tailpipe gas concentrations levels for major roads and highways in Detroit metropolitan area. This was accomplished by mounting a sensor on the vehicle's cowl to record the concentration levels of the above gases. A second sensor was installed inside of the cabin to monitor the concentration levels of the above gases entering into the cabin due to the response time of the actuator for the blower unit's air intake door. The levels of the gas concentrations on Detroit metro highways are moderate to high in comparison to rural regions. The concentration levels are the worst on I-696 and North Western Highway10 inside of the tunnels and the areas where retaining walls are present on either sides of the highway.
2005-05-10
Technical Paper
2005-01-2058
Gursaran D. Mathur
The current investigation focuses on the heat pick up by the air as it flows into the cowl from one end to the blower unit intake. Tests were conducted on a number of current production vehicles. The following are the major conclusions from this study: 1 A study of 8 current production vehicles revealed that the cowl surface were significantly heated resulting in an increased air temperature as it flows into the blower intake through the cowl. 2 Based on the wind tunnel data, the sheet metal cowl channel is heated up to 50∼63 °C at highway speeds and up to 85 °C at idle. 3 Hence, in OSA mode the ambient air is heated up by the hot channel surface as it travels from the cowl inlet to the blower unit that result in increasing the evaporator loads by significant levels, thereby, increasing the vent outlet temperature. 4 Tests were conducted by removing the cowl cover to determine the maximum potential of improvements (to prevent air from being heated up in the cowl channel).
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1512
Gursaran D. Mathur
The current investigation is focused on enhancing the mobile air conditioning performance by improving the air management for the front end. The following enhancing strategies were investigated: air guides, seals between the condenser and radiator and the seals on the hood. The following are the major conclusions from this study: A study of 12 current production vehicles revealed that the majority of the vehicles did not have good front end designs for optimum performance. Significant amount of air bypasses the condenser and radiator in the current production vehicles that has a major impact on the performance of the air conditioning and engine cooling systems. For a typical current production vehicle 15% bypassed the condenser; 24% bypassed the radiator; and 9% bypassed between the condenser and the radiator. This is the first paper in the literature that presents this information.
Viewing 1 to 6 of 6