Criteria

Text:
Affiliation:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 1529
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2202
Shiyou Yang
Abstract This work presents an application of two sub-models relative to chemical-kinetics-based turbulent pre-mixed combustion modeling approach on the simulation of burn rate and emissions of spark ignition engines. In present paper, the justification of turbulent pre-mixed combustion modeling directly based on chemical kinetics plus a turbulence model is given briefly. Two sub-models relative to this kind of pre-mixed combustion modeling approach are described generally, including a practical PRF (primary reference fuel) chemical kinetic mechanism which can correctly capture the laminar flame speed under a wide range of Ford SI (spark ignition) engines/operating conditions, and an advanced spark plug ignition model which has been developed by Ford recently.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2343
Nicolas Champagne, Nicolas Obrecht, Arup Gangopadhyay, Rob Zdrodowski, Z Liu
Abstract The oil and additive industry is challenged to meet future automotive legislations aimed at reducing worldwide CO2 emissions levels. The most efficient solution used to date has been to decrease oil viscosity leading to the introduction of new SAE grades. However this solution may soon reach its limit due to potential issues related to wear with lower engine oil viscosities. In this paper, an innovative solution is proposed that combines the use of a new tailor-made polyalkylene glycol (PAG) with specific anti-wear additives. Valvetrain wear measurements using radionuclide technique demonstrates the robustness of this solution. The wear performance was also confirmed in Sequence IVA test. An extensive tribological evaluation (film formation, wear and tribofilm surface analysis) of the interactions between the base oil and the anti-wear additives lead us to propose an underlying mechanism that can explain this performance benefit.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2446
Pengchuan Wang, Nikolaos Katopodes, Yuji Fujii
Abstract Wet clutch packs are the key component for gear shifting in the step-ratio automatic transmission system. The clutch plates are coupled or de-coupled to alter gear ratios based on the driver’s actions and vehicle operating conditions. The frictional interfaces between clutch plates are lubricated with automatic transmission fluid (ATF) for both thermal and friction management. In a 10-speed transmission, there may be as many as 6 clutch packs. Under typical driving conditions, 2 to 3 clutch packs are open, shearing ATF and contributing to energy loss. There is an opportunity to improve fuel economy by reducing the associated viscous drag. An important factor that directly affects clutch drag is the clearance between rotating plates. The axial position of clutch plates changes continuously during operation. It is known in practice that not only the total clearance, but also its distribution between the plates affects the viscous drag.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2071
Keith Miazgowicz
The advent of turbochargers and the Eco-Boost technology at Ford in gasoline engines creates new challenges that need to be addressed with innovative designs. One of them is flow induced noise caused by airflow entering the turbocharger during off design operation. At certain vehicle operation conditions, the mass flow rate and pressure ratio are such that compressor wheel can generate a wide range of acoustic frequencies. Characterization of ‘whistles’ or pure tonal noises, ‘whoosh’ or broad band frequency noise caused by flow separation from the blade surfaces, and chirps, where the frequency increases or decreases with time are a few of the common error states. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of such noise generation is necessary for developing effective countermeasures for the noise source generation. Computational Aero-Acoustic (CAA) analyses are performed to study the effects of inlet and outlet conditions to find the source of the noise.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2534
Silvia Faria Iombriller, Wesley Bolognesi Prado
Summary Considering that the most part of commercial vehicles are equipped with air brakes it is very important assure specific technical requirements for air brake system and its components. In addition, the effects of brake system failure are more critical for commercial vehicles which require more attention on their requirements details. Historically, the development of air brakes technology started on North America and Europe and consequently two strong and distinct resolutions were structured: FMVSS 121 and ECE R.13, respectively. For passenger cars were developed the ECER.13H to harmonize North American and European resolutions. However, for commercial vehicles regional applications, culture and implementation time must be considered. These commercial vehicles peculiarities must be understood and their specific requirements harmonized to attend the global marketing growth.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0065
Helmut Ruhland, Thomas Lorenz, Jens Dunstheimer, Albert Breuer, Maziar Khosravi
Abstract An integral part of combustion system development for previous NA gasoline engines was the optimization of charge motion towards the best compromise in terms of full load performance, part load stability, emissions and, last but not least, fuel economy. This optimum balance may potentially be different in GTDI engines. While it is generally accepted that an increased charge motion level improves the mixture preparation in direct injection gasoline engines, the tradeoff in terms of performance seems to become less dominant as the boosting systems of modern engines are typically capable enough to compensate the flow losses generated by the more restrictive ports. Nevertheless, the increased boost level does not come free; increased charge motion generates higher pumping- and wall heat losses. Hence it is questionable and engine dependent, whether more charge motion is always better.
2017-08-18
Journal Article
2017-01-9378
Eric Kurtz, Christopher J. Polonowski
Abstract The design of modern diesel-powered vehicles involves optimization and balancing of trade-offs for fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise. To meet increasingly stringent emission regulations, diesel powertrains employ aftertreatment devices to control nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter emissions and use active exhaust warm-up strategies to ensure those devices are active as quickly as possible. A typical strategy for exhaust warm-up is to operate with retarded combustion phasing, limited by combustion stability and HC emissions. The amount of exhaust enthalpy available for catalyst light-off is limited by the extent to which combustion phasing can be retarded. Diesel cetane number (CN), a measure of fuel ignition quality, has an influence on combustion stability at retarded combustion phasing. Diesel fuel in the United States tends to have a lower CN (both minimum required and average in market) than other countries.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1864
Joshua Wheeler
Abstract The performance of a vehicle’s Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) system is dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the cabin at the time a user voices their command. HVAC noise and environmental noise in particular (like road and wind noise), provide high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that lower the SNR within the vehicle cabin, and work to mask the user’s speech. Managing this noise is a vital key to building a vehicle that meets the customer’s expectations for ASR performance. However, a speech recognition engineer is not likely to be the same person responsible for designing the tires, suspension, air ducts and vents, sound package and exterior body shape that define the amount of noise present in the cabin.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1781
Joshua Wheeler
Abstract The design and operation of a vehicle’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system has great impact on the performance of the vehicle’s Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Hands-Free Communication (HFC) system. HVAC noise provides high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that affects the signal to noise ratio (SNR) within the vehicle cabin, and works to mask the user’s speech. But what’s less obvious is that when the airflow from the panel vents or defroster openings can be directed toward the vehicle microphone, a mechanical “buffeting” phenomenon occurs on the microphone’s diaphragm that distresses the ASR system beyond its ability to interpret the user’s voice. The airflow velocity can be strong enough that a simple windscreen on the microphone is not enough to eliminate the problem. Minimizing this buffeting effect is a vital key to building a vehicle that meets the customer’s expectations for ASR and HFC performance.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1798
Jiri Navratil, Warren Seeley, Peng Wang, Shriram Siravara
Abstract The ability to accurately predict exhaust system acoustics, including transmission loss (TL) and tailpipe noise, based on CAD geometry has long been a requirement of most OEM’s and Tier 1 exhaust suppliers. Correlation to measurement data has been problematic under various operating conditions, including flow. This study was undertaken to develop robust modelling technique, ensuring sensible correlation between the 1-D models and test data. Ford use Ricardo WAVE as one of their 1-D NVH tools, which was chosen for the purpose of this benchmark study. The most commonly used metrics for evaluating the acoustical performance of mufflers are insertion loss (IL), TL, and noise reduction (NR). TL is often the first step of analysis, since it represents the inherent capability of the muffler to attenuate sound if both the source and termination are assumed to be anechoic. It can also be reliably measured and numerically simulated without having to connect to an engine.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1796
Rick D. Dehner, Ahmet Selamet, Michael Steiger, Keith Miazgowicz, Ahsanul Karim
Abstract Ported shroud compressor covers recirculate low momentum air near the inducer blade tips, and the use of these devices has traditionally been confined to extending the low-flow operating region at elevated rotational speeds for compressors on compression-ignition (CI) engines. Implementation of ported shrouds on compressors for spark-ignition (SI) engines has been generally avoided due to operation at pressure ratios below the region where ported shrouds improve low-flow range, the slight efficiency penalty, and the perception of increased noise. The present study provides an experimental investigation of performance and acoustics for a SI engine turbocharger compressor both with a ported shroud and without (baseline). The objective of implementing the ported shroud was to reduce mid-flow range broadband whoosh noise of the baseline compressor over 4-12 kHz.
2017-05-24
Technical Paper
2017-36-0004
Wesley Bolognesi Prado, Silvia Faria Iombriller, Jonathan Orsi Chiu, Alexandre Roman
Abstract S-cam brakes concept are largely used by commercial vehicles around the world due to its low cost, easy maintenance and robustness. An important component of s-cam brakes is the slack adjuster, that is responsible for amplify brake chamber forces and assure correct lining and drum clearance. Therefore usually slack adjuster mechanism characteristics are defined only by empiric method considering trial and error tentative. This paper aims to demonstrate a methodology created to develop new air s-cam brakes slack adjuster definition taken in consideration its interface with other brake components. During this study was identified design specification for each component and its influence on adjustment process. It was verified the intrinsic characteristics of slack adjuster mechanism and developed a calculation tool to predict its actuation on the brake. The interface of slack adjuster with other foundation brake components and drum compliance were also studied.
2017-04-11
Journal Article
2017-01-9175
Yitao Zhu, Makarand Datar, Kalyan Addepalli, Natalie Remisoski
Nowadays, the vehicle design is highly ruled by the increasing customer demands and expectations. In addition to ride comfort and vehicle handling, the Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH) behavior of the powertrain is also a critical factor that has a big impact on the customer experience. To evaluate the powertrain NVH characteristics, the NVH error states should be studied. A typical NVH event could be decoupled into 3 parts: source, path, and receiver. Take-off shudder, which evaluates the NVH severity level during vehicle take-off, is one of the most important NVH error states. The main sources of Front Wheel Drive (FWD) take-off shudder are the plunging Constant Velocity Joints (CVJ) on the left and right half shafts. This is because a plunging CVJ generates a third order plunging force with half shaft Revolution Per Minute (RPM), which is along the slip of the plunging CVJ.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0776
Ulrich Kramer, Thomas Lorenz, Christian Hofmann, Helmut Ruhland, Rolf Klein, Carsten Weber
Abstract A fundamental requirement for natural gas (NG) and renewable methane (e.g. bio-methane or power-to-gas methane) as automotive fuel is reliable knock resistance; to enable optimization of dedicated NG engines with high compression ratio and high turbocharger boost (which enables considerable engine downsizing factors). In order to describe the knock resistance of NG, the Methane Number (MN) has been introduced. The lowest MN which generally can be found in any NG is 65, and the vast majority of NG (~ 99.8%) is delivered with a MN above 70. The MN of bio-methane and power-to-gas methane is usually far above 80. Thus, from an automotive point of view any methane fuel should at least provide a minimum Methane Number of 70 at any point of sale. But the European draft standard describing the automotive CNG fuel quality so far proposes a minimum MN limit of 65.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1694
Victor Silva, Renato Veiga
Abstract Demand for enhanced infotainment systems with features like navigation, real-time traffic, music streaming service, mirroring and others is increasing, forcing automakers to develop solutions that fulfill customer needs. However, many of those systems are too expensive to be fitted to an entry-level vehicle leaving a gap in the market that fails customer’s expectation. This gap is usually filled by a smartphone which may have all the features the customer wants but in many cases it cannot be properly fitted in the vehicle due to lack of specific storage space. This paper describes how the engineering team developed an innovative, flexible and effective solution that holds a smartphone in an ergonomic location.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1706
Sandeep Bhattacharya, Daniel Green, Raj Sohmshetty, Ahmet Alpas
Abstract Automobile body panels made from advanced high strength steel (AHSS) provide high strength-to-mass ratio and thus AHSS are important for automotive light-weighting strategy. However, in order to increase their use, the significant wear damage that AHSS sheets cause to the trim dies should be reduced. The wear of dies has undesirable consequences including deterioration of trimmed parts' edges. In this research, die wear measurement techniques that consisted of white-light optical interferometry methods supported by large depth-of-field optical microscopy were developed. 1.4 mm-thick DP980-type AHSS sheets were trimmed using dies made from AISI D2 steel. A clearance of 10% of the thickness of the sheets was maintained between the upper and lower dies. The wear of the upper and lower dies was evaluated and material abrasion and chipping were identified as the main damage features at the trim edges.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1383
Satheesh Kumar Chandran, James Forbes, Carrie Bittick, Kathleen Allanson, Fnu Brinda
Abstract There is a strong business case for automotive interfaces to undergo usability testing throughout their product development lifecycle. System Usability Scale (SUS) is a simple and standard measure of usability. To meet the timing needs for product development, usability testing needs to be performed in a quick, cost effective manner. Hence the required sample size of participants for a usability study is one of the critical factors. To determine an acceptable sample size, a Monte Carlo simulation using SUS scores from eleven different in-vehicle automotive interface usability studies was used to create 500,000 subsamples of different sample sizes. The percentage of subsamples with mean scores within the confidence interval of the population mean was calculated. At a subsample size of thirty-five, 95% of the subsamples have a mean SUS score within the 95% confidence interval of the population mean.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1381
Satheesh Kumar Chandran, James Forbes, Carrie Bittick, Shimul Bhuva
Abstract There is a strong business case for automotive companies to improve by understanding what consumers want, like and dislike. Various aspects of ergonomics such as reach, visibility, usability, feel are dependent on measuring consumer’s ability, opinions and satisfaction. Rating scales (such as adjective, continuous, logarithmic, etc.) are used to measure these complex attitudes. It is essential the correct rating scale and appropriate analysis methods are used to capture these attitudes. Previous psychology research has been conducted on the performance of different rating scales. This ratings scale research focused on scales and their reliability and validity for various applications. This paper will summarize past research, discuss the use of rating scales specific to vehicle ergonomics, and analyze the results of an automotive interface study that correlates the seven-point adjective rating scale to the system usability score (SUS).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1388
S. M. Akbar Berry, Michael Kolich, Johnathan Line, Waguih ElMaraghy
Abstract Thermal comfort in automotive seating has been studied and discussed for a long time. The available research, because it is focused on the components, has not produced a model that provides insight into the human-seat system interaction. This work, which represents the beginning of an extensive research program, aims to establish the foundation for such a model. This paper will discuss the key physiological, psychological, and biomechanical factors related to perceptions of thermal comfort in automotive seats. The methodology to establish perceived thermal comfort requirements will also be presented and discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1385
Satheesh Kumar Chandran, James Forbes, Carrie Bittick, Kathleen Allanson, Santosh Erupaka, Fnu Brinda
Abstract Measurement of usability with the System Usability Scale (SUS) is successfully applied to products in many industries. The benefit of any measurement scale, however, is limited by the repeatability of the associated testing process. For SUS, these factors can include sample size, study protocol, previous experience, and pre study exposure to the system being tested. Differences in user exposure can influence the usability assessment of interfaces which could affect the validity of SUS scores.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1372
Bo Wang, Smruti Panigrahi, Mayur Narsude, Amit Mohanty
Abstract Increasing number of vehicles are equipped with telematics devices and are able to transmit vehicle CAN bus information remotely. This paper examines the possibility of identifying individual drivers from their driving signatures embedded in these telematics data. The vehicle telematics data used in this study were collected from a small fleet of 30 Ford Fiesta vehicles driven by 30 volunteer drivers over 15 days of real-world driving in London, UK. The collected CAN signals included vehicle speed, accelerator pedal position, brake pedal pressure, steering wheel angle, gear position, and engine RPM. These signals were collected at approximately 5Hz frequency and transmitted to the cloud for offline driver identification modeling. A list of driving metrics was developed to quantify driver behaviors, such as mean brake pedal pressure and longitudinal jerk. Random Forest (RF) was used to predict driver IDs based on the developed driving metrics.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1378
Gianna F. Gomez-Levi, Ksenia Kozak, Nanxin Wang, Jian Wan, Linas Mikulionis
Abstract Researchers report an estimated 35.7 million of vehicles with touchscreens will be sold in 2019 worldwide [1]. As the use of touchscreens grows in the automotive industry, there is a need to study how driver’s arm and hand moves to access the touchscreen as well as how the driver utilizes the hardware around the touchscreen. In order to aid drivers while using the touchscreen and to minimize distractions, the drivers’ hand must be able to freely move to perform a task on the touchscreen without the trim interfering with the task. At the same time some trim may be used to support the hand and fingers while accessing the touchscreen particularly during tasks that take a longer period of time to complete. A study was performed to understand the effect of the size and the angle of a shelf placed under a touchscreen. Motion capture (Mocap) data of the hand of subjects performing two different tasks on the touchscreen was collected in the Human Occupant Package Simulator (HOPS).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0382
Oscar Hernandez Cervantes, Antonio Espiritu Santo Rincon
Abstract The development of an automatic control system for a towing dynamometer used for testing is described in this paper. The process involved the deployment of new power electronics circuit boards, a TELMA retarder, instrumentation and a human machine interface (HMI) achieved through an open source platform. The purpose of this platform is to have a low cost system that allows further function development, data acquisition and communication with other devices. This system is intended as a novel solution that will allow closed loop and automated tests integrated with PCM data for engine calibration. It is projected to be part of a flexible calibration system with direct communication to the interfaces used during development (ATI, ETAS), which will be used to achieve lean test and development schedules.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0490
Rodrigo Polkowski, Alper Kiziltas, Marcelo Ueki
Abstract In recent years, a special attention has been given to the environment protection, as evidenced by an increased commitment of governments and industries for a better use of energy and for reducing the levels of vehicle emissions (CO2). The use of renewable and bio-based plastics in the automotive sector is being considered as alternative solution to the conventional petroleum-based polymeric materials. In the present work, biobased polymer blends were formulated using two polyamides made from biorenewable resources. Polyamide 10,10 (PA1010) and polyamide 6,10 (PA610) were melt mixed in different compositions and the mechanical properties of the blends were investigated by tensile evaluations. The mechanical properties of the blends show intermediate values compared to the pure polymers. Significant improvements on these properties could be observed with the incorporation of PA610 in the blends.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0481
Xian Jun Sun, Patricia Tibbenham, Jin Zhou, Danielle Zeng, Shiyao Huang, Li Lu, Xuming Su
Abstract Weld lines occur when melt flow fronts meet during the injection molding of plastic parts. It is important to investigate the weld line because the weld line area can induce potential failure of structural application. In this paper, a weld line factor (W-L factor) was adopted to describe the strength reduction to the ultimate strength due to the appearance of weld line. There were two engineering thermoplastics involved in this study, including one neat PP and one of talc filled PP plastics. The experimental design was used to investigate four main injection molding parameters (melt temperature, mold temperature, injection speed and packing pressure). Both the tensile bar samples with/without weld lines were molded at each process settings. The sample strength was obtained by the tensile tests under two levels of testing speed (5mm/min and 200mm/min) and testing temperatures (room temperature and -30°C).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0482
Cristiano Grings Herbert, Luiz Rogério De Andrade Lima, Cristiane Gonçalves
Abstract Phthalates have been extensively used in rubbers formulation as plasticizer additive for PVC and NBR promoting processing parameters or for cost reduction. The most commonly used plasticizer in PVC compounds was di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) currently not recommend due toxicity. DEHP is listed as prohibited to the Global Automotive Declarable Substance List (GADSL). Phthalates alternatives are already available but the compatibility in automotive fuel system with biodiesel was not extensively understood. This aspect is important since plasticizer may migrate and change rubber properties. Tri-2-ethylhexyl trimellitate (TOTM) and di-2-ethylhexyl terephthalate (DEHT) were selected in this work as alternative additives to a rubber formulation since is not listed to GADSL and have good potential as plasticizer.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0493
Li Lu, Sean West, Stacey Raines, Jin Zhou, Paul Hoke, Yi Yang Tay
Abstract Traditionally, Knee Air Bag (KAB) is constructed of a woven nylon or polyester fabric. Recently, Ford developed an injection molded air bag system for the passenger side called Active Glove Box (AGB). This system integrates a plastic bladder welded between the glove box outer and inner doors. This new system is smaller and lighter, thus improving the roominess and other creature comforts inside the passenger cabin while providing equivalent restraint performance as traditional knee airbag system. This patented technology allows positioning of airbags in new locations within the vehicle, thus giving more freedom to designers. The first application of this technology was standard equipment on the 2015 Ford Mustang. Given that this technology is first in the industry, it was a challenge to design, test and evaluate the performance of the system as there is no benchmark to compare this technology. A CAE driven design methodology was chosen to overcome this challenge.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0494
Michael Christian Haverkamp, Anja Moos
Abstract Material authenticity is an important factor for appearance and perceived quality of the vehicle interior. The term authenticity implies ambivalence: For the product designer, it means identification and trueness of the origin of the material. The customers, however, can only access information on the nature of the materials via their own perception of surface features. Thus, the intended authenticity of a material always needs to be conveyed by its surface. Specific cases illustrate the context: 1. The customer touches a part of known matter, but various layers prevent from directly touching the natural material: e.g. leather at the steering wheel, applications of wood. 2. Perception of a thin surface layer indicates authentic material, which is not fulfilled by the whole part: e.g. plastic parts plated with metal. 3.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0069
Venkatesh Raman, Mayur Narsude, Damodharan Padmanaban
Abstract This manuscript compares window-based data imputation approaches for data coming from connected vehicles during actual driving scenarios and obtained using on-board data acquisition devices. Three distinct window-based approaches were used for cleansing and imputing the missing values in different CAN-bus (Controller Area Network) signals. Lengths of windows used for data imputation for the three approaches were: 1) entire time-course for each vehicle ID, 2) day, and 3) trip (defined as duration between vehicle's ignition statuses ON to OFF). An algorithm for identification of ignition ON and OFF events is also presented, since this signal was not explicitly captured during the data acquisition phase. As a case study, these imputation techniques were applied to the data from a driver behavior classification experiment.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0323
Rosa Radovanovic, Samuel J. Tomlinson
Abstract Press-in-place gasket stability is required to maintain consistent and predictive sealing compression in a sealing joint utilizing a housing groove and a mating component sealing surface. Without proper balance between height of the groove and height of the gasket, the sealing joint can be compromised. Hence, automotive engineers balance design variables with the desire to achieve long term sealability and gasket stability. The percentage of gasket out of groove was varied to study the interactions of this design control and the resultant deviation of gasket centerline to the groove centerline. Finally, an optimal percentage of gasket out of groove is recommended.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 1529

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: