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Viewing 1 to 27 of 27
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1320
Yucheng Liu
Abstract A cost effective, portable particulate management system was developed, prototyped, and evaluated for further application and commercialization, which could remove and dispose particulate matter suspended in air efficiently and safely. A prototype of the present system was built for experimental assessment and validation. The experimental data showed that the developed particulate management system can effectively clean the air by capturing the particles inside it. Effects of viscosity of filter medium on the performance of the developed system were also discussed. The present system is very flexible, whose size and shape can be scaled and changed to be fit for different applications. Its manufacturing cost is less than $10. Based on the experimental validation results, it was found that the present system can be further developed, commercialized, and applied for a variety of industries.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1588
Yucheng Liu, Collin Davenport, James Gafford, Michael Mazzola, John Ball, Sherif Abdelwahed, Matthew Doude, Reuben Burch
Abstract A dynamic modeling framework was established to predict status (position, displacement, velocity, acceleration, and shape) of a towed vehicle system with different driver inputs. This framework consists of three components: (1) a state space model to decide position and velocity for the vehicle system based on Newton’s second law; (2) an angular acceleration transferring model, which leads to a hypothesis that the each towed unit follows the same path as the towing vehicle; and (3) a polygon model to draw instantaneous polygons to envelop the entire system at any time point. Input parameters of this model include initial conditions of the system, real-time locations of a reference point (e.g. front center of the towing vehicle) that can be determined from a beacon and radar system, and instantaneous accelerations of this system, which come from driver maneuvers (accelerating, braking, steering, etc.) can be read from a data acquisition system installed on the towing vehicle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1305
Yucheng Liu, Jeremy Batte, Zachary Collins, Jennifer Bateman, John Atkins, Madelyn Davis, David Salley, Cindy L. Bethel, John Ball, Christopher Archibald
Abstract A robot mining system was developed by the State Space Robotic undergraduate student design team from Mississippi State University (MSU) for the 2016 NASA Robotic Mining Competition. The mining robot was designed to traverse the Martian chaotic terrain, excavate a minimum of 10 kg of Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a collector bin within 10 minutes as part of the competition. A Systems Engineering approach was followed in proceeding with this design project. The designed mining robot consisted of two major components: (1) mechanical system and (2) control system. This paper mainly focuses on the design and assessment process of the mechanical system but will also briefly mention the control system so as to evaluate the designed robotic system in its entirety. The final designed robot consisted of an aluminum frame driven by four motors and wheels. It utilized a scoop and lifting arm subsystem for collecting and depositing Martian regolith.
2016-12-21
Journal Article
2016-01-9082
Bradley Michael, Rani Sullivan, Dulip Samaratunga, Ratneshwar Jha
Abstract Polymer matrix composites are increasingly adopted in aerospace and automotive industries due to their many attributes, such as their high strength to weight ratio, tailorability, and high fatigue and durability performance. However, these materials also have complex damage and failure mechanisms, such as delaminations, which can severely degrade their strength and fatigue performance. To effectively and safely use composite materials in primary structures, it is essential to assess composite damage response for development of accurate predictive models. Therefore, this study focuses on determining the response of damaged and undamaged carbon epoxy beams subjected to vibration loadings at elevated temperatures. The Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) technique is used to analyze the beams’ modal response. The HHT shows potential in identifying the nonlinear damaged response of the beams.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2359
Khashayar Olia, Masood Shahverdi, Michael Mazzola, Abdelwahed Sherif
Although the cost-saving and good environmental impacts are the benefits that make Electric Vehicles (EVs) popular, these advantages are significantly influenced by the cost of battery replacement over the vehicle lifetime. After several charging and discharging cycles, the battery is subjected to energy and power degradation which affects the performance and efficiency of the vehicle. In addition to battery replacement cost, the electricity cost being paid by drivers is another key factor in selecting the EVs. An Energy Management System (EMS) with Model Predictive Control-based (MPC) algorithm is presented for a specific case of heavy-duty EV. Such EV draws its energy from the grid via catenary in addition to the on-board battery. Dynamic model of the vehicle will be defined by State Space Equations (SSE).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0315
Daniel Downs, Taylor Comer, Christopher Archibald, Cindy Bethel, Christopher Goodin, Phillip Durst
Abstract The ability to quickly and automatically evaluate vehicle designs is a critical tool in an efficient vehicle design process. This paper presents techniques for vehicle parameter estimation using automatic intelligent simulations. These techniques enable the efficient and automatic evaluation of many important aspects of vehicle designs. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by using vehicle tests that are commonly performed on military ground vehicles. Our simulation techniques are able to determine the relevant vehicle performance characteristics in a much more efficient manner than could be done previously. This is done automatically, once the user has specified the type of test to be performed. A terrain sample is automatically generated and the vehicle’s behavior on each terrain instance is evaluated until the specified test conditions are met.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2586
Bradley Michael, Rani Warsi Sullivan, Dulip Samaratunga, Ratneshwar Jha
Abstract The vibration response from undamaged and damaged polymer matrix composite beams at elevated temperatures is analyzed using the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) technique. The HHT shows potential in identifying the nonlinear damaged response of the beams. Using empirical mode decomposition to separate superposed modes of signals, several intrinsic mode functions can be determined which can reveal more information about complex nonlinear signals than traditional data analysis techniques such as the Fourier Transform. The composite beams are fabricated from an out-of-autoclave uniaxial carbon/epoxy prepreg (CYCOM™-5320-1/T650). Delamination damage in the composite layups is introduced by insertion of mold release wax films during fabrication. A shaker-table fixture was used for the vibration testing of all beams in a vertical cantilever configuration. High temperature piezoelectric accelerometers were used to obtain the vibration data for a frequency range of 1-61 Hz.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2402
Yucheng Liu
Abstract Differential equations play a prominent role in aerospace engineering by modeling aerospace structures, describing important phenomena, and simulating mathematical behavior of aerospace dynamical systems. Presently, aerospace systems have become more complex, space vehicle missions require more hours of simulation time to complete a maneuver, and high-performance missiles require more logical decisions in there phases of flight. Because of these conditions, a computationally efficient algorithm for solving these differential equations is highly demanded to significantly reduce the computing time.
2013-09-17
Journal Article
2013-01-2270
Joseph Carroll, David Marcum
Many Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (SUAV) are driven by small scale, fixed blade propellers. Flow produced by the propeller can have a significant impact on the aerodynamics of a SUAV. Therefore, in Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations, it is often necessary to simulate the SUAV and propeller coupled together. For computational efficiency, the propeller can be modeled in a steady-state view by using momentum source terms to add the thrust and swirl produced by the propeller to the flow field. Many momentum source term models are based on blade element theory. Blade element theory divides the blade into element sections in the spanwise direction and assumes each element to operate independently as a two-dimensional (2D) airfoil.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0980
Marcos Lugo, J. B. Jordon, J.D. Bernard, M.F. Horstemeyer
We characterize the cyclic behavior of an AM30 extruded magnesium alloy. The micromechanisms of cyclic damage were studied by means of strain controlled experiments in both the extruded and transverse directions. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the microstructure revealed that second phase particles were present in the Mg alloy that nucleated the cracks. However, crack initiation sites were observed to occur due to profuse twinning. Low cycle fatigue parameters were determined, and a microstructure-sensitive MultiStage Fatigue (MSF) model, which is able to capture mechanical and microstructure properties, was implemented to predict fatigue behavior and failure.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0554
Nicole Lambiase, Brian Benoy, Kristen De La Rosa, Vahid Motevalli, George Molen, Douglas Nelson, Robert Alley, Patrick Walsh
EcoCAR 2: Plugging In to the Future (EcoCAR) is North America's premier collegiate automotive engineering competition, challenging students with systems-level advanced powertrain design and integration. The three-year Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition (AVTC) series is organized by Argonne National Laboratory, headline sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and General Motors (GM), and sponsored by more than 28 industry and government leaders. Fifteen university teams from across North America are challenged to reduce the environmental impact of a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu by redesigning the vehicle powertrain without compromising performance, safety, or consumer acceptability. During the three-year program, EcoCAR teams follow a real-world Vehicle Development Process (VDP) modeled after GM's own VDP. The VDP serves as a roadmap for the engineering process of designing, building and refining advanced technology vehicles.
2012-09-10
Journal Article
2012-01-1768
Matthew Doude, G. Marshall Molen, William Brown, Joshua Hoop, Jonathan Moore, William Dickerson
EcoCAR 2: Plugging In to the Future is a three-year design competition co-sponsored by General Motors and the Department of Energy. Mississippi State University has designed a plug-in hybrid powertrain for a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu vehicle platform. This vehicle will be capable of 57 miles all-electric range and utility-factor corrected fuel economy of greater than 80 miles per gallon gasoline equivalent (mpgge). All modifications are designed without sacrificing any of the vehicle's utility or performance. Advanced modeling, simulation, and Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) simulation capabilities are being used for rapid control prototyping and vehicle design to ensure success in the following years of the competition.
2009-06-15
Technical Paper
2009-01-1979
Gang Sheng, Mohamad Qatu, Rao V. Dukkipati, Jun Zhu
Serpentine belt system has been widely used to drive automotive accessories like power steering pump, alternator, and A/C compressor from a crankshaft pulley. Overload under severe conditions can lead to excessive slippage in the belt pulley interface in poorly designed accessory systems. This can lead to undesirable noise that increases warranty cost substantially. The mechanisms and data of these tribology performance, noise features and system response are of utmost interest to the accessory drive designers. As accessories belt systems are usually used in ambient condition, the presence of water on belt is unavoidable under the raining weather conditions. The presence of water in interface induces larger slippage as the water film in interface changes the friction mechanisms in rubber belt-pulley interface from coulomb friction to friction with mixed lubrication that has negative slope of coefficient of friction (cof) - velocity.
2009-05-19
Technical Paper
2009-01-2066
Mohamad S. Qatu, Javed Iqbal
The advantages of having higher stiffness to weight ratio and strength to weigh ratio that composite materials have resulted in an increased interest in them. In automotive engineering, the weight savings has positive impacts on other attributes like fuel economy and possible noise, vibration and harshness (NVH). The driveline of an automotive system can be a target for possible use of composite materials. The design of the driveshaft of an automotive system is primarily driven by its natural frequency. This paper presents an exact solution for the vibration of a composite driveshaft with intermediate joints. The joint is modeled as a frictionless internal hinge. The Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is used. Lumped masses are placed on each side of the joint to represent the joint mass. Equations of motion are developed using the appropriate boundary conditions and then solved exactly.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-0348
K. E. Brister, M.F. Horstemeyer, E. Acar, K. Solanki
The Mississippi State University Formula SAE race car upright was optimized using radial basis function metamodels and an internal state variable (ISV) plasticity damage material model. The weight reduction of the upright was part of a goal to reduce the weight of the vehicle by 25 percent. Using an optimization routine provided an upright design that is lighter that helps to improve vehicle fuel economy, acceleration, and handling. Finite element (FE) models of the upright were produced using quadratic tetrahedral elements. Using tetrahedral elements provided a quick way to produce the multiple FE models of the upright required for the multi-objective optimization. A design of experiments was used to determine how many simulations were required for the optimization. The loads for the simulations included braking, acceleration, and corning loads seen by the car under track conditions.
2007-06-12
Technical Paper
2007-01-2475
Mark D. Thomas, John A. McGinley, Daniel W. Carruth, Christopher Blackledge
The current research conducted a cross-validation between an infrared motion capture system and an electromechanical motion capture device. No differences were found between the motion capture methods in shoulder and elbow angles. However, differences were found between the motion capture methods on distances of hand movements and actor location in space. Results of the current study indicate electromechanical motion capture devices are too inaccurate to use for validating digital human models unless the ultimate application of the model does not require millimeter accuracy or an absolute location in space. If one is primarily interested in joint angles, and distances are secondary, an electromechanical device is acceptable.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0942
Sundar Rajan Krishnan*, Kalyan Kumar Srinivasan, Kenneth Clark Midkiff
Recently [1, 2, 3 and 4], the novel Advanced (injection) Low Pilot-Ignited Natural Gas (ALPING) low-temperature combustion (LTC) concept was demonstrated to yield very low NOx emissions (<0.2 g/kWh) with high fuel conversion efficiencies (>40%). In the ALPING-LTC concept, very small diesel pilot sprays (contributing ∼2-3 percent of total fuel energy) are injected early in the compression stroke (60°BTDC) to ignite lean, homogeneous natural gas-air mixtures. To simulate ALPING-LTC, a phenomenological thermodynamic model was developed. The cylinder contents were divided into an unburned zone containing fresh natural gas-air mixture, several packets containing diesel and entrained natural gas-air mixture, a flame zone, and a burned zone. The simulation explicitly accounted for pilot injection, spray entrainment, diesel ignition (with the Shell autoignition model), spray combustion of diesel and entrained natural gas, and premixed turbulent combustion of the natural gas-air mixture.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1065
C. L. Whitt, D. L. Oglesby, E. W. Jones
The Mississippi State Challenge X team has built a new rear cradle for its 2005 Chevy Equinox hybrid, which allows for the integration of a Ballard electric drive system. The OEM cradle would have required extensive modification for the installation of the Ballard unit. The new cradle will save space by utilizing smaller members with thicker walls, thereby permitting more flexibility in mounting the drive. The team developed a working model of the MSU cradle that serves the duties of the existing cradle and allows the Ballard drive to be installed. Analytical calculations were performed to determine the loads experienced by the cradle during on-road service. A stress analysis was then performed using these loading criteria. The MSU team determined that mechanical testing would be the fastest way to analyze the stiffness of the original part. Two mechanical tests were performed to determine the part's stiffness.
2006-08-30
Technical Paper
2006-01-2443
Issam K. Samarah, Gamal S. Weheba, Thomas E. Lacy
A series of carefully selected tests were used to isolate the coupled influence of various combinations of the number of facesheet plies, impact energies, and impactor diameters on the damage formation and residual strength degradation of sandwich composites due to normal impact. The diameter of the planar damage area associated with Through Transmission Ultrasonic C-scan and the compression after impact measurements were used to describe the extent of the internal damage and residual strength degradation of test panels, respectively. Standard analysis of variance techniques were used to assess the significance of the regression models, individual terms, and the model lack-of-fit. In addition, the inherent variability associated with given types of experimental measurements was evaluated.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1060
Joseph Szczerba, Scott Geisler, Vincent G. Duffy, Zachary Rowland, Jihun Kang
This study examines the performance and subject acceptance level of a hand-operated brake actuator. Using a fixed-base vehicle simulator, data for driver reaction time, stopping time, distance, deceleration, customer acceptance and mental workload were collected. Data for three prototype hand-operated brake actuators and traditional foot-operated brake were compared. An additional test, designed to evaluate anthropometrics, sensitivity, and comfort was performed during training. A user preference survey to determine handbrake acceptance was given to subjects after completing the driving test in the simulator. In certain trials, participants were given the choice of handbrake or footbrake for an unexpected stop condition. When placed into an unexpected braking situation, subjects showed faster brake-application times for operating the hand-operated brake, indicating potential for reduced braking distance.
2005-06-14
Technical Paper
2005-01-2733
Tinghao Wu, John McGinley, Vincent G. Duffy, Liqin Liu
This study introduces a system which integrates a mechanical motion capture system into computer-aided ergonomics assessment. The study focuses on the application of the system on industrial ergonomics studies and evaluation of system's over-time reliability and criteria-related validity in assessing ergonomics risks. Two lifting jobs were analyzed using this system in the real industrial environment. By taking the manual measurement as the baseline criteria, the validity of the system was assessed. The system demonstrated the capability in efficiency and accuracy. Also, participants were invited to perform two lifting tasks in a well-calibrated lab environment in different time. By comparing the ergonomic assessment results between different trials, the system over-time reliability was assessed. The high correlation of ergonomics result between trials demonstrated good over-time reliability.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1174
Kiran Solanki, D. L. Oglesby, C. L. Burton, H. Fang, M. F. Horstemeyer
Finite element models of vehicles have been increasingly used in component design and crashworthiness evaluation. As vehicle finite element models are becoming more sophisticated in terms of their accuracy, robustness, fidelity, and size, the need to compare different FEA codes has become more apparent. In this study, we compare finite element simulations of a 1996 Dodge Neon using LS-DYNA and PAM-CRASH codes with an effort to keep sameness of the material models, meshes and boundary conditions. The original Neon mesh and material properties were developed at the FHWA/NHTSA National Crash Analysis Center (NCAC) for LS-DYNA and subsequently modified for this study. The comparisons between test data and simulation results of the full-scale vehicle in terms of overall impact deformation, component failure modes, and velocity and acceleration at various locations in the vehicle show good correlations with only minor discrepancy.
2002-03-04
Technical Paper
2002-01-0368
Richard Patton, Micael Edwards
The concept of a structural index, λ, is developed using the simple example of a hollow beam with a cantilever load case. It is assumed that when performing material substitution, only the thickness, t, is changed. It is shown that the stiffness, K, of the beam can be defined as a function of tλ, that 1 ≤ λ ≤ 3, and that λ can be used to predict the weight savings from material substitution where stiffness is held constant. It is then demonstrated that λ can be used to predict the weight savings from material substitution in the more complex cases of the joints of a light truck cab.
2002-03-04
Technical Paper
2002-01-1291
Richard Patton, Fang Li
The substitution of lightweight materials, such as aluminum or magnesium alloys, to produce lightweight car bodies, has been the subject of intensive research in resent years. It has been established that an aluminum body is lighter than a steel body for constant stiffness. The causes of this weight reduction have not been established. In particular, since the specific modulus (modulus of elasticity/density) of steel, aluminum and magnesium are nearly identical, there is no easy answer for their ability to reduce weight. In this paper, it is shown that there are stress concentrations in thin walled structures, which are dependent on the thickness of the material. These stress concentrations appear in joints and other parts with complex geometry and loading conditions. For example, the flanges on a curved beam in flexure have an effective (load bearing) width, which increases as the material is thickened.
2000-12-04
Technical Paper
2000-01-3424
Richard Patton, Ellen Brehob, Matthew State, Vickie Furman, Paul Geck, Michael Cummins
This paper reports on the efforts of the initial phase of the IMPACT program to define the underlying structural theory behind selecting the proper material(s) to reduce weight in the most efficient, cost-effective manner. Following this initial phase, the IMPACT program will proceed to design and build, optimized, proprietary, full vehicle platform prototypes that achieve up to a 25 percent weight reduction total without compromising any customer-driven vehicle attributes. Most importantly, the materials and technologies selected must be implementation ready for high volume, low cost, dual-use applications. The purpose of the initial phase and an in-depth discussion on which material properties should most influence material selection are presented.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770470
Phillip D. Bridges, Ernest J. Cross, Donald W. Boatwright
A flight test method has been developed for determining the level flight drag and propulsive efficiency of propeller-driven aircraft. The overall drag of the aircraft is expressed in terms of the measured increment of power required to overcome a corresponding known increment of drag, which is generated by a towed drogue. The simplest form of the governing equations, , is such that all of the parameters on the right side of the equation can be measured in flight. An evaluation of the governing equations has been performed using data generated by flight test of a Beechcraft T-34B.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770473
A. G. Bennett, J. K. Owens, R. L. Harris
A simple rugged acoustic stall sensor which has an output proportional to angle of attack near wing stall has been evaluated on a Cessna 319 aircraft. A sensor position has been found on the wing where the sensor output is only slightly affected by engine power level, yaw angle, flap position and wing roughness. The NASA LRC General Aviation Simulator has been used to evaluate the acoustic sensor output as a control signal for active stall deterrent systems. It has been found that a simple control algorithm is sufficient for stall deterrence.
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