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Viewing 1 to 30 of 146
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2502
Yujun Liao, Panayotis Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Alexander Spiteri, Lorenzo Nocivelli, Gianluca Montenegro, Konstantinos Boulouchos
The injection process of urea-water solution (AdBlue) determines initial conditions for reactions and catalysis and is fundamentally responsible for optimal operation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. The spray characteristics of four, commercially available, injectors (one air-assisted and three pressure-driven with different nozzle-hole configurations) are investigated with non-intrusive measuring techniques. Injection occurred in the crossflow of a channel blowing preheated air in an exhaust duct similar configuration. The effect of several gas temperatures and flows on the spray propagation and entrainment has been extensively studied by shadow imaging. Shadow images, in addition, show that the spray of the pressure-driven injectors is only marginally affected by the gas crossflow. In contrast, the air assisted spray is strongly deflected by the gas, the effect increasing with increasing gas flow.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2501
Thomas Laible, Stefan Pischinger, Bastian Holderbaum
Abstract Within a project of the Research Association for Combustion Engines e.V., different measures for rising the temperature of exhaust gas aftertreatment components of both a passenger car and an industrial/commercial vehicle engine were investigated on a test bench as well as in simulation. With the passenger car diesel engine and different catalyst configurations, the potential of internal and external heating measures was evaluated. The configuration consisting of a NOx storage catalyst (NSC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) illustrates the potential of an electrically heated NSC. The exhaust aftertreatment system consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a DPF shows in simulation how variable valve timing in combination with electric heated DOC can be used to increase the exhaust gas temperature and thus fulfill the EU6 emission limits.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2506
Paolo Iodice, Adolfo Senatore
Nowadays, due to catalyst improvements and electronic mixture control of last generation vehicles equipped with internal combustion engine, the most significant part of the total emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons takes place during the cold phase, if compared with those exhausted in hot conditions, with a clear consequence on air quality of urban contexts. The purpose of this research, developed by the Department of Industrial Engineering of the University of Naples Federico II with reference to an European background, is a deeper analysis of the engine and after-treatment system behaviour within the cold start transient and the evaluation of cold start additional emissions: a methodology was developed and optimized to evaluate the cold transient duration, the emitted quantities during the cold phase and the relevant time-dependence function.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2508
Joschka Schaub, Thorsten Schnorbus, Thomas Koerfer, Stefan Pischinger
Abstract Model-based control strategies along with an adapted calibration process become more important in the overall vehicle development process. The main drivers for this development trend are increasing numbers of vehicle variants and more complex engine hardware, which is required to fulfill the more and more stringent emission legislation and fuel consumption norms. Upcoming fundamental changes in the homologation process with EU 6c, covering an extended range of different operational and ambient conditions, are suspected to intensify this trend. One main reason for the increased calibration effort is the use of various complex aftertreatment technologies amongst different vehicle applications, requiring numerous combustion modes. The different combustion modes range from heating strategies for active Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration or early SCR light-off and rich combustion modes to purge the NOx storage catalyst (NSC) up to partially premixed combustion modes.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2504
Gerben Doornbos, Emma Adams, Per-Anders Carlsson, Daniel Dahl, Mats Laurell, Håkan Schyllander, Par Gabrielsson, Milica Folic, Ingemar Denbratt, Magnus Skoglundh
Commercial three way catalysts have limited capacity towards reducing NOx in the presence of excessive oxygen. This prevents lean-burn combustion concepts from meeting legislative emission standards. A solution towards decreasing NOx emissions in the presence of excess air is the use of a passive-SCR system. Under rich conditions ammonia is formed over an ammonia formation catalyst, the ammonia is stored in the SCR and in its turn reacts with the NOx under lean engine conditions. Here up-scaled Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 catalysts as well as a commercially Pd-Rh based three-way catalyst (TWC) are evaluated using both engine and further lab-scale tests. The purpose of these tests is to compare the ammonia production for the various catalysts under various lambda values and temperatures by means of engine and lab scale tests. The Pd/Al2O3 showed little sensitivity to temperature both under engine and lab scale experiments.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2513
Michal Vojtisek-Lom, Vit Beranek, Jitka Stolcpartova, Martin Pechout, Vojtech Klir
Abstract N-butanol and isobutanol are alcohols that can be produced from biomass by fermentation and are possibly more compatible with existing engines than ethanol. This work reports on the effects of these two isomers on exhaust emissions of an unmodified direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine. A Ford Focus car with a 1.0-liter Euro 6 Ecoboost DISI engine has been tested on a chassis dynamometer using WLTP and Artemis driving cycles, and on the road on a one-hour test loop containing urban, rural and motorway driving. Two isomers of butanol, 1-butanol and 2-methyl-propanol, were each blended with gasoline at 25% volume. Non-oxygenated gasoline and 15% ethanol in gasoline (E15) were used as reference fuels. The vehicle performed well in terms of cold start, drivability, general performance, and off-cycle particle emissions, staying within several mg of particle mass and about 2×1012 particles (per PMP procedure) per km during laboratory tests.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2512
Barouch Giechaskiel, Alessandro Zardini, Giorgio Martini
Abstract In 2011 a particle number (PN) limit was introduced in the European Union's vehicle exhaust legislation for diesel passenger cars. The PN method requires measurement of solid particles (i.e. those that do not evaporate at 350 °C) with diameters above 23 nm. In 2013 the same approach was introduced for heavy duty engines and in 2014 for gasoline direct injection vehicles. This decision was based on a long evaluation that concluded that there is no significant sub-23 nm fraction for these technologies. In this paper we examine the suitability of the current PN method for L-category vehicles (two- or three-wheel vehicles and quadri-cycles). Emission levels of 5 mopeds, 9 motorcycles, 2 tricycles (one of them diesel) and 1 quad are presented. Special attention is given to sub-23 nm emission levels. The investigation was conducted with PN legislation compliant systems with particle counters measuring above 23 nm and 10 nm.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2510
Jan Czerwinski, Pierre Comte, Martin Güdel, Andreas Mayer, Jacques Lemaire, Felix Reutimann, Adm Heinz Berger
Abstract As a result of increased use of catalytic exhaust aftertreatment systems of vehicles and the low-sulfur Diesel fuels there is an increasing share of nitrogen dioxide NO2 in the ambient air of several cities. This is in spite of lowering the summary nitric oxides NOx emissions from vehicles. NO2 is much more toxic than nitrogen monoxide NO and it will be specially considered in the next legal testing procedures. There are doubts about the accuracy of analyzing the reactive substances from diluted gas and this project has the objective to show how NO2 is changing as it travels down through the exhaust- and the CVS systems. For legal measurements of NO2 a WLTP-DTP subgroup (Worldwide Light Duty Test Procedures - Diesel Test Procedures) proposed different combinations of NOx-analyzers and analysis of NO and NOx. Some of these set-ups were tested in this work.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2509
Maria Vittoria Prati, Giovanni Meccariello, Livia Della Ragione, Maria Antonietta Costagliola
The aim of this study is to investigate the parameters influencing the real driving emission monitoring with particular attention towards the influence of road gradient. For this purpose, an experimental activity was carried out with a Euro 5 Diesel light-duty vehicle, driven along two tracks of Naples characterized by a different road gradient: the first pattern is quite flat, the second includes positive (+2.9%) and negative (−3.6%) road gradient. Exhaust emissions of CO, THC, NOx, CO2 were acquired on road by using a portable emission measuring system (PEMS) connected also to the Engine Control Unit for saving the main engine parameters and to the GPS for the geographical coordinates and altitude. The acquired speed profiles were repeated on the chassis-dynamometer without simulating the road gradient.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2517
Piotr Bielaczyc, Joseph Woodburn, Andrzej Szczotka
Abstract Particulate matter in vehicular exhaust is now under great scrutiny. In the EU, direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engines running on petrol now have limits for particulate emissions set for both mass and number. Current legislative test procedures represent a best-case scenario - more aggressive driving cycles and lower ambient temperatures can increase particulate emissions massively. Ambient temperature is generally the environmental parameter of most importance regarding particulate emissions from an engine, particularly for the reasonably brief periods of operation typical for passenger cars operating from a cold start. Two Euro 5 vehicles with DI SI engines were laboratory tested at three ambient temperatures on two different commercially available fuels, with particulate emissions results compared to results from the same fuels when the vehicles were tested at 25°C.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2516
Panayotis Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Daniel Schreiber
Particulate matter in diesel exhaust is captured in diesel particulate filters (DPFs). Since increased load in the filter and thus increased pressure drop deteriorates the engine performance, the filter load of the DPF has to be removed during a process referred to as regeneration. Measures for successful regeneration aim at accelerating soot oxidation and increase fuel consumption. Regeneration lay-out and thus fuel consumption increase is strongly depending on the oxidation behavior of soot. The aim of the present study is the investigation of soot oxidation characteristics. Therefore particle filters have been loaded with soot using the exhaust gas of small heavy duty vehicle operated under defined conditions on an engine dynamometer. The particle filters have been then dismantled and fragmented on their constituting segments. Each filter segment has been regenerated individually in a specifically designed test bench.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2515
Christophe Barro, Sushant Pandurangi, Philipp Meyer, Konstantinos Boulouchos, Philipp Elbert, Yuri M. Wright
Abstract Past research has shown that post injections have the potential to reduce Diesel engine exhaust PM concentration without any significant influence in NOx emissions. However, an accurate, widely applicable rule of how to parameterize a post injection such that it provides a maximum reduction of PM emissions does not exist. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms are not thoroughly understood. In past research, the underlying mechanisms have been investigated in engine experiments, in constant volume chambers and also using detailed 3D CFD-CMC simulations. It has been observed that soot reduction due to a post injection is mainly due to two reasons: increased turbulence from the post injection during soot oxidation and lower soot formation due to lower amount of fuel in the main combustion at similar load conditions. Those studies do not show a significant temperature rise caused by the post injection.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2514
Marco Piumetti, Samir Bensaid, Nunzio Russo
A set of ceria-zirconia nanocatalysts with different Zr-contents and structural properties was prepared to study the effect of both the Zr-amount and surface-dependent activity towards soot combustion in “loose” and “tight” soot-catalyst contact. The properties of the catalysts were examined using several physico-chemical techniques. The best soot oxidation activities were achieved for the Ce0.9Zr0.1O2-NP catalyst (NP means nano-polyhedra and 0.9 indicates the atomic ratio of Ce/Ce+Zr), due to its easier reducibility, compared to high-surface area catalysts with the same Ce/Zr ratio. Moreover, better performances were reached for Ce0.9Zr0.1O2-NP, than similar nano-polyhedra with higher Zr-amounts (denoted as CexZr1-xO2-NP, where x = 0.8 or 0.7). On the other hand, worse activities were obtained for both mesoporous and microporous catalysts with the same Ce/Zr ratio.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2520
Simona Silvia Merola, Adrian Irimescu, Gerardo Valentino, Cinzia Tornatore, Stefano Silva, Alberto Grimaldi, Eugenio Carugati
Abstract A plasma ignition system was tested in a GDI engine with the target of combustion efficiency improvement without modifying engine configuration. The plasma was generated by spark discharge and successively sustained to enhance its duration up to 4 ms. The innovative ignition system was tested in an optically accessible single-cylinder DISI engine to investigate the effects of plasma on kernel stability and flame front propagation under low loads and lean mixture (λ≅1.3). The engine was equipped with the head of a commercial turbocharged engine with similar geometrical specifications (bore, stroke, compression ratio). All experiments were performed at 2000 rpm and 100 bar injection pressure. UV-visible 2D chemiluminescence was applied in order to study the flame front inception and propagation with particular interest in the early combustion stages. A bandpass filter allowed selecting luminous signal due to OH radicals.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2521
José Ramón Serrano, Pedro Piqueras, Emanuele Angiolini, Cesare Meano, Joaquín De La Morena
Abstract The abatement of nitrogen oxides emissions is a topic of major concern for automotive manufacturers. In addition to aftertreatment solutions such as LNT or SCR devices, the use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is necessary in most of the applications to meet emissions regulations. Due to the high specific humidity of the exhaust gases, a high condensate flow may be generated if EGR gases are significantly cooled down. In the case of long-route EGR (LR-EGR) usage, this condensate flow would reach the compressor wheel. This paper explores the variables governing the condensation process and the potential effects of the liquid droplets and streams on the compressor wheel durability combining experimental and theoretical approach. For this purpose, visualization of both the condensate flow and the compressor wheel are performed. Tests are conducted in a flow test rig in which LR-EGR water content is reproduced by water injection on the hot air mass flow.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2518
Riccardo Amirante, Elia Distaso, Paolo Tamburrano, Rolf D. Reitz
Due to the new challenge of meeting number-based regulations for particulate matter (PM), a numerical and experimental study has been conducted to better understand particulate formation in engines fuelled with compressed natural gas. The study has been conducted on a Heavy-Duty, Euro VI, 4-cylinder, spark ignited engine, with multipoint sequential phased injection and stoichiometric combustion. For the experimental measurements two different instruments were used: a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a fast-response particle size spectrometer (DMS) the latter able also to provide a particle size distribution of the measured particles in the range from 5 to 1000 nm. Experimental measurements in both stationary and transient conditions were carried out. The data using the World Harmonized Transient Cycle (WHTC) were useful to detect which operating conditions lead to high numbers of particles. Then a further transient test was used for a more detailed and deeper analysis.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2519
Richard Cornwell, Huntly Thomas, Joshua Dalby, Phil Carden, Brian Knight, Andrew Ward, Grace Carr
Fuel consumption, and the physical behaviours behind it, have never been of greater interest to the automotive engineering community. The enormous design, development and infrastructure investment involved with a new engine family which will be in production for many years demands significant review of the base engine fundamental architecture. Future CO2 challenges are pushing car manufacturers to consider alternative engine configurations. As a result, a wide range of diesel engine architectures are available in production, particularly in the 1.4 to 1.6 L passenger car market, including variations in cylinder size, number of valves per cylinder, and bore:stroke (B/S) ratio. In addition, the 3 cylinder engine has entered the market in growing numbers, despite its historic NVH concerns. Ricardo has performed a generic architecture study for a midsize displacement engine in order to assess the pros and cons of each engine configuration.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2525
Luigi De Simio, Sabato Iannaccone, Michele Gambino, Veniero Giglio, Natale Rispoli, Gianluca Barbolini, Dario Catanese, Marco Ferrari, Walter Lo Casale
This paper presents an experimental study on a 2-stroke SI engine, used on small portable tools for gardening or agriculture, aimed to identify possible correlations between parameters related to ionization current and air/fuel mixture richness, considering different fuels and spark plug wear. This, to realize a simple system to control the engine parameters and adapt them to engine aging and fuel type changing. The engine was fed with commercial gasoline, low octane number gasoline, alkylate gasoline and a blend of 80% gasoline and 20% ethanol. In all tests carried out with varying engine speed and spark advance the ionization signal was characterized by a single peak, resulting in the impossibility of distinguishing chemical and thermal ionization. All data collected were analyzed looking for correlations between all the available data of CO emissions and several characteristic parameters obtained from the ionization signal.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2526
Borislav Klarin, Thomas Resch, Chiara Sessarego, Giorgio Spanu, Gianni Lamonaca
This paper presents a methodology for numerical investigation of a full flexible balancer drive together with engine and crank train under realistic operating conditions where shaft dynamics, gear contact and rattle impacts, gear root stresses and friction losses in bearings and gear interaction are taken into account and can be balanced against each other to achieve the design criteria. Gear rattle is driven by the speed fluctuation of the crank train, the resistance torque (mainly friction), shaft inertia and the backlash in the gears. The actual trend to engine downsizing and up-torqueing increases the severity to rattle as engines are running on higher combustion pressures. This increases torque and speed fluctuation, which makes the detailed investigation in this torque transfer even more demanding. A common method to reduce gear rattle is the usage of so-called scissors gears.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2523
Calogero Avola, Colin Copeland, Tomasz Duda, Richard Burke, Sam Akehurst, Chris Brace
Abstract The adoption of two stage serial turbochargers in combination with internal combustion engines can improve the overall efficiency of powertrain systems. In conjunction with the increase of engine volumetric efficiency, two stage boosting technologies are capable of improving torque and pedal response of small displacement engines. In two stage sequential systems, high pressure (HP) and low pressure (LP) turbochargers are packaged in a way that the exhaust gases access the LP turbine after exiting the HP turbine. On the induction side, fresh air is compressed sequentially by LP and HP compressors. The former is able to deliver elevated pressure ratios, but it is not able to highly compressor low flow rates of air. The latter turbo-machine can increase charge pressure at lower mass air flow and be by-passed at high rates of air flow.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2524
José Lujan, José V. Pastor, Héctor Climent, Manuel Rivas
Abstract On actual gasoline turbocharged engines it is common to use a compressor by-pass valve in order to solve the compressor surge problem when the throttle pedal position is released and closes rapidly. The paper deals with a methodology based on experiments to measure the discharge coefficient of an integrated compressor by-pass valve, to understand the possible difference between the steady flow test bench and turbocharger test bench discharge coefficient measurements. To determine if there is some compressor outlet flow field influence due to compressor blades rotation that could modify the discharge coefficient measurement, compared to the steady flow test bench measurements, a fully instrumented turbocharger was used to measure the difference between steady flow test bench and turbocharger test bench discharge coefficients results.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2530
Mohamed El Morsy, Gabriela Achtenova
Abstract A vehicle gearbox serves for torque and speed conversion with help of rotating elements. Therefore the gearbox experiences periodic excitation forces with a fundamental frequency following the rotation frequency. These excitation forces give rise to corresponding periodic response signals, i.e. signals having content at the fundamental (rotational) frequency and its harmonics. Order analysis is an analysis technique which is used to extract these harmonic orders from the response signals. This article intends to use the order tracking analysis for gearbox fault diagnosis under variable speed conditions to compare between healthy and faulty cases by using order extraction. Finally, determine maximum Root Mean Square (RMS) as severity index.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2531
Marco Leonetti, Michael Bargende, Martin Kreschel, Christoph Meier, Horst Schulze
Abstract Due to the demands for today's passenger cars regarding fuel consumption and emissions, exhaust turbo charging has become a fundamental step in achieving these goals. Especially in upper and middle class vehicles it is also necessary to consider the noise comfort. Today, floating bushings are mainly used as radial bearings in turbochargers. In the conventional operating range of the turbocharger dynamic instability occurs in the lubrication films of the bearings. This instability is transferred by structure-borne noise into audible airborne sound and known as constant tone phenomenon. This phenomenon is not the major contributor of the engine noise but its tonal character is very unpleasant. In order to gain a more detailed understanding about the origin of this phenomenon, displacement sensors have been applied to the compressor- and the turbine-side of the rotor, to be able to determine the displacement path.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2527
Daniela Siano, Giovanni Ferrara, Giulio Lenzi, Danilo D'Agostino, Andrea Fioravanti
In an Internal Combustion Engine, the design of the intake system is a very critical aspect since it affects both the engine power output and noise emissions at the intake side. In particular, downsized VVA engines typically produce higher gas-dynamic noise levels since, due to the intake line de-throttling at part-load, a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves is realized. In this work, the acoustic performance of the intake air filter of a commercial VVA engine is numerically and experimentally analyzed. In particular, a FEM model of the system is realized in order to compute the Transmission Loss (TL) parameter of the base device. The numerical analysis accounts of fluid-structure interaction, which gives the possibility to determine the effect of structure participation on the TL profile. Contemporarily, the experimental tests are performed on an acoustic test bench based on the multi-microphone technique for the evaluation of the acoustic parameters.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2529
Riccardo Russo, Salvatore Strano, Mario Terzo
A new controllable limited slip differential is proposed and tested in software environment. It is characterized by the employment of a magnetorheological fluid, which presents the property of changing its rheology thanks to an applied magnetic field. A vehicle model has been designed and employed for the synthesis of a sliding controller. The control is based on a double level scheme: the upper controller aims to generate the target locking torque, while the lower controller generates, as control action, the supply current for the controllable limited slip differential. The obtained results show the effectiveness of the device in terms of vehicle dynamics improvement. Indeed, the results reached by the vehicle in presence of the new differential confirm the improved performances for both steady and unsteady state manoeuvres.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2535
Andreas Behn, Matthias Feindt, Gerhard Matz, Sven Krause, Marcus Gohl
Abstract The limitation of fuel entry into the oil sump of an internal combustion engine during operation is important to preserve the tribological properties of the lubricant and limit component wear. For observation and quantification of the effects leading to fuel entry, a highly sensitive and versatile measurement system is essential. While oil sampling from the sump followed by laboratory analysis is a common procedure, there is no system for automatic sampling of all the positions and fast online analysis of the samples. For the research project ‘Fuel in Oil’, a measurement system was developed especially for the described tasks. The system is placed next to the engine in the test cell. Sampling points are the target point of the fuel injector jet and the liner below, the oil sump and the crankcase ventilation system.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2534
Jochen Bregar, Adrian Rienäcker, Marcus Gohl, Gunter Knoll
Increased quantities of fuel in the lubricating oil of CI engines pose a major challenge to the automotive industry in terms of controlling the oil aging and the wear caused by dilution. Due to a lack of methods to calculate the oil-fuel-composite transport across the ring pack, predicting the fuel ratio in the oil sump has been an extremely challenging task for engine manufacturers. An accurate and computationally efficient simulation model is critical to predict the quantity of fuel diluted in the oil in the preliminary development stage of automotive engines. In this work, the complex composite transport across the piston ring pack was reduced to a simple transport model, which was successfully implemented into a multi-body simulation of the ring pack. The calculation domain was partitioned into two parts, the ring grooves and the piston lands. Inside the grooves the oil flow caused by the pumping and squeezing action of the piston rings was calculated using the Reynolds equation.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2532
Reinhard Ratzberger, Thomas Kraxner, Jochen Pramhas, Klaus Hadl, Helmut Eichlseder, Ludwig Buergler
Abstract The continuously decreasing emission limits lead to a growing importance of exhaust aftertreatment in Diesel engines. Hence, methods for achieving a rapid catalyst light-off after engine cold start and for maintaining the catalyst temperature during low load operation will become more and more necessary. The present work evaluates several valve timing strategies concerning their ability for doing so. For this purpose, simulations as well as experimental investigations were conducted. A special focus of simulation was on pointing out the relevance of exhaust temperature, mass flow and enthalpy for these thermomanagement tasks. An increase of exhaust temperature is beneficial for both catalyst heat-up and maintaining catalyst temperature. In case of the exhaust mass flow, high values are advantageous only in case of a catalyst heat-up process, while maintaining catalyst temperature is supported by a low mass flow.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2473
Alessandro Montanaro, Luigi Allocca, Giovanni Meccariello, Maurizio Lazzaro
Abstract In internal combustion engines, the direct injection at high pressures produces a strong impact of the fuel on the combustion chamber wall, especially in small-bore sizes used for passenger cars. This effect is relevant for the combustion process resulting in an increase of the pollutant emissions and in a reduction of the engine performances. This paper aims to report the effects of the injection pressure and wall temperature on the macroscopic behavior and atomization of the impinging sprays on the wall. The gasoline spray-wall interaction was characterized inside an optically accessible quiescent chamber using a novel make ready Z-shaped schlieren-Mie scattering set-up using a high-speed C-Mos camera as imaging system. The arrangement was capable to acquire alternatively the schlieren and Mie-scattering images in a quasi-simultaneous fashion using the same line-of-sight.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2476
Christian Pötsch, Laura Sophie Baumgartner, Daniel Koch, Felix Bernhard, Bastian Beyfuss, Georg Wachtmeister, Donatus Wichelhaus
Alongside with the severe restrictions according to technical regulations of the corresponding racing series (air and/or fuel mass flow), the optimization of the mixture formation in SI-race engines is one of the most demanding challenges with respect to engine performance. Bearing in mind its impact on the ignition behavior and the following combustion, the physical processes during mixture formation play a vital role not only in respect of the engine's efficiency, fuel consumption, and exhaust gas emissions but also on engine performance. Furthermore, abnormal combustion phenomena such as engine knock may be enhanced by insufficient mixture formation. This can presumably be explained by the strong influence of the spatial distribution of the air/fuel-ratio on the inflammability of the mixture as well as the local velocity of the turbulent flame front.
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