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Viewing 1 to 30 of 1255
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1386
Mark Sellnau, James Sinnamon, Kevin Hoyer, Harry Husted
A single-cylinder engine was used to study the potential of a high-efficiency combustion concept called gasoline direct-injection compression-ignition (GDCI). Low temperature combustion was achieved using multiple injections, intake boost, and moderate EGR to reduce engine-out NOx and PM emissions engine for stringent emissions standards. This combustion strategy benefits from the relatively long ignition delay and high volatility of regular unleaded gasoline fuel. Tests were conducted at 6 bar IMEP - 1500 rpm using various injection strategies with low-to-moderate injection pressure. Results showed that triple injection GDCI achieved about 8 percent greater indicated thermal efficiency and about 14 percent lower specific CO2 emissions relative to diesel baseline tests on the same engine. Heat release rates and combustion noise could be controlled with a multiple-late injection strategy for controlled fuel-air stratification. Estimated heat losses were significantly reduced.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1385
Yi Ren, Xianguo Li
The importance of using biodiesel as an alternative in diesel engines has been demonstrated previously. A reduction in the soot, CO and HC emissions and an increase in the NO emission burning biodiesel fuels were reported consistently in previous technical papers. However, a widely accepted NO formation mechanism for biodiesel-fueled engines is currently lacking. As a result, in past multi-dimensional simulation studies, the NO emission of biodiesel combustion was predicted unsatisfactorily. In this study, the interaction between the soot and NO formations is considered during the prediction of the soot and NO emissions in a biodiesel-fueled engine. Meanwhile, a three-step soot model and an eight NO model which includes both the thermal NO mechanism and prompt mechanism are implemented.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1389
Kihyun Kim, Sangwook Han, Choongsik Bae
Mode transition between low temperature combustion and conventional combustion was investigated in a direct injection diesel engine. Low temperature diesel combustion was realized by means of high exhaust gas recirculation rate (69~73%) and early injection timing (-28~ -16 crank angle degree after top dead center) compared with those (20% exhaust gas recirculation rate and -8 crank angle degree after top dead center) of conventional combustion. Tests were carried out at different engine speeds and injection pressures. Exhaust gas recirculation rate was changed transiently by controlling each throttle angle for fresh air and exhaust gas recirculation to implement mode transition. Various durations for throttle transition were applied to investigate the effect of speed change of exhaust gas recirculation rate on the characteristics of mode transition.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1388
Andrew Smallbone, Amit Bhave, Aaron R. Coble, Sebastian Mosbach, Markus Kraft, Robert McDavid
In recent decades, “physics-based” gas-dynamics simulation tools have been employed to reduce development timescales of IC engines by enabling engineers to carry out parametric examinations and optimisation of alternative engine geometry and operating strategy configurations using desktop PCs. However to date, these models have proved inadequate for optimisation of in-cylinder combustion and emissions characteristics thus extending development timescales through additional experimental development efforts. This research paper describes how a Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) with reduced chemistry can be employed to successfully determine in-cylinder pressure, heat release and emissions trends from a diesel fuelled engine operated in compression ignition direct injection mode using computations which are completed in 147 seconds per cycle.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1382
Wenbin Yu, Bin Liu, Yang Li, Qingpeng Su, Yiqiang Pei, Wanhua Su
Combustion control strategy for high efficiency and low emissions in a heavy duty (H D) diesel engine was investigated experimentally in a single cylinder test engine with a common rail fuel system, EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) system, boost system and retarded intake valve closing timing actuator. For the operation loads of IMEPg (Gross Indicated Mean Effective Pressure) less than 1.1 MPa the low temperature combustion (LTC) with high rate of EGR was applied. The fuel injection modes of either single injection or multi-pulse injections, boost pressure and retarded intake valve closing timing (RIVCT) were also coupled with the engine operation condition loads for high efficiency and low emissions. A higher boost pressure played an important role in improving fuel efficiency and obtaining ultra-low soot and NOx emissions.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1381
Ezio Mancaruso, Luigi Sequino, Bianca Maria Vaglieco, Claudio Ciaravino, Alberto Vassallo
The present paper describes the results of a cooperative research project between GM Powertrain Europe and Istituto Motori - CNR aimed at studying the impact of both fresh and highly oxidized RME at two levels of blending on spray formation and combustion in modern automotive diesel engines. The tests were performed on an optical single-cylinder engine sharing combustion system configuration with the 2.0L Euro5 GM diesel engine for passenger car application. Two blends (B50 and B100) blending were tested for both fresh and aged RME and compared with commercial diesel fuel in two different operating points typical of NEDC (1500rpm/2bar BMEP and 2000rpm/5bar BMEP). The experimental activity was devoted to an in-depth investigation of the spray density, breakup and penetration, mixture formation, combustion and soot formation, by means of optical techniques.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1384
Michael J. Tess, Chang-Wook Lee, Rolf D. Reitz
Several diffusion combustion scaling models were experimentally tested in two geometrically similar single-cylinder diesel engines with a bore diameter ratio of 1.7. Assuming that the engines have the same in-cylinder thermodynamic conditions and equivalence ratio, the combustion models primarily change the fuel injection pressure and engine speed in order to attain similar performance and emissions. The models tested include an extended scaling model, which scales diffusion flame lift-off length and jet spray penetration; a simple scaling model, which only scales spray penetration at equal mean piston speed; and a same speed scaling model, which holds crankshaft rotational velocity constant while also scaling spray penetration. Successfully scaling diffusion combustion proved difficult to accomplish because of apparent differences that remained in the fuel-air mixing and heat transfer processes.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1383
Clément Chartier, Oivind Andersson, Bengt Johansson, Mark Musculus, Mohan Bobba
Post-injection strategies aimed at reducing engine-out emissions of unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) were investigated in an optical heavy-duty diesel engine operating at a low-load, low-temperature combustion (LTC) condition with high dilution (12.7% intake oxygen) where UHC emissions are problematic. Exhaust gas measurements showed that a carefully selected post injection reduced engine-out load-specific UHC emissions by 20% compared to operation with a single injection in the same load range. High-speed in-cylinder chemiluminescence imaging revealed that without a post injection, most of the chemiluminescence emission occurs close to the bowl wall, with no significant chemiluminescence signal within 27 mm of the injector. Previous studies have shown that over-leaning in this near-injector region after the end of injection causes the local equivalence ratio to fall below the ignitability limit.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1395
Cody William Squibb, Harold Schock, Thomas Stuecken, Mulyanto Poort, Kyle Crayne, Charles Gray, Fakhri Hamady
This work presents a method for simultaneously capturing visible and infrared images along with pressure data in an optical Diesel engine based on the International 4.5L VT275 engine. This paper seeks to illustrate the merits of each imaging technique for visualizing both in-cylinder fuel spray and combustion. The engine was operated under a part load, high simulated exhaust gas recirculation operating condition. Experiments examining fuel spray were conducted in nitrogen. Overlays of simultaneously acquired infrared and visible images are presented to illustrate the differences in imaging between the two techniques. It is seen that the infrared images spatially describe the fuel spray, especially fuel vapors, and the fuel mixing process better than the high-speed visible images.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1394
Carl Magnus Lewander, Bengt Johansson, Per Tunestal
Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is a combustion concept by which it is possible to get low smoke and NOx emissions simultaneously. PPC requires high EGR levels to extend the ignition delay so that air and fuel mix prior to combustion to a larger extent than with conventional diesel combustion. This paper investigates the operating region of single injection PPC for three different fuels; Diesel, low octane gasoline with similar characteristics as diesel and higher octane standard gasoline. Limits in emissions are defined and the highest load that fulfills these requirements is determined. The investigation shows the benefits of using high octane number fuel for Multi-Cylinder PPC. With high octane fuel the ignition delay is made longer and the operating region of single injection PPC can be extended significantly. Experiments are carried out on a multi-cylinder heavy-duty engine at low, medium and high speed.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1397
Vladimir Marcov, Sergey Gladyshev, Sergey Devianin
Parameters of the fuel economy and the exhaust gases pollution of the high-speed diesel engines, with unshared and half-shared combustion chambers, are predetermined by processes of fuel spray and fuel-air mixture creation. The parameters of these processes (fuel spraying and development of flame structure dynamic) appreciably depend from design features of a flowing part of the injector tips. The major parameters of the injector tips design are the spraying nozzles length and the ratio of the length these nozzles to their diameters. The experimental research of the D-245.12C type diesel engine has been carried out. Fuel injectors of the diesel engine were equipped with injector tips of different spray nozzles lengths. The experimental data show improvement fuel efficiency, reduction of emissions and smoke due to optimization of geometries in the injector tip.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1396
Yingying Lu, Wenbin Yu, Wanhua Su
The Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) engine has the potential to reduce soot and NOx emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency at part load conditions. However, several technical barriers must be overcome. Notably ways must be found to control ignition timing, expand its limited operation range and limit the rate of heat release. In this paper, comparing with single fuel injection, the superiority of multiple-pulse fuel injection in extending engine load, improve emissions and thermal efficiency trade-off using high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and boost in diesel PCCI combustion is studied by engine experiments and simulation study. It was found that EGR can delay the start of hot temperature reactions, reduce the reaction speed to avoid knock combustion in high load, is a very useful method to expand high load limit of PCCI. EGR can reduce the NOx emission to a very small value in PCCI.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1391
Philipp Adomeit, Markus Jakob, Andreas Kolbeck, Stefan Pischinger
The requirement of reducing worldwide CO₂ emissions and engine pollutants are demanding an increased use of bio-fuels. Ethanol with its established production technology can contribute to this goal. However, due to its resistive auto-ignition behavior the use of ethanol-based fuels is limited to the spark-ignited gasoline combustion process. For application to the compression-ignited diesel combustion process advanced ignition systems are required. In general, ethanol offers a significant potential to improve the soot emission behavior of the diesel engine due to its oxygen content and its enhanced evaporation behavior. In this contribution the ignition behavior of ethanol and mixtures with high ethanol content is investigated in combination with advanced ignition systems with ceramic glow-plugs under diesel engine relevant thermodynamic conditions in a high pressure and temperature vessel.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1390
Antonio Pires da Cruz, Jean-Pierre Dumas, Gilles Bruneaux
Soot Volume Fraction (SVF) measurements were performed in an IFP Energies nouvelles optical single cylinder Diesel engine operated in Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) conditions. The engine was equipped with a sapphire liner, a dedicated flat bowl piston and a six-hole common-rail high pressure injector. The piston design included four quartz windows allowing optical access into the bowl. The aim of this work was to study soot formation and oxidation during the LTC Diesel combustion process and to build a database providing soot formation and oxidation data under a set of engine conditions to help developing and testing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. Two complementary optical diagnostic techniques were combined: Planar Laser Induced Incandescence (PLII) and Laser Extinction Method (LEM).
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1393
Kazuhisa Inagaki, Jyunichi Mizuta, Takayuki Fuyuto, Takeshi Hashizume, Hirokazu Ito, Hiroshi Kuzuyama, Tsutomu Kawae, Masaaki Kono
A new clean diesel combustion concept has been proposed and its excellent performance with respect to gas emissions and fuel economy were demonstrated using a single cylinder diesel engine. It features the following three items: (1) low-penetrating and highly dispersed spray using a specially designed injector with very small and numerous orifices, (2) a lower compression ratio, and (3) drastically restricted in-cylinder flow by means of very low swirl ports and a lip-less shallow dish type piston cavity. Item (1) creates a more homogeneous air-fuel mixture with early fuel injection timings, while preventing wall wetting, i.e., impingement of the spray onto the wall. In other words, this spray is suitable for premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) operation, and can decrease both nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot considerably when the utilization range of PCCI is maximized.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1392
Marcis Jansons, Radu Florea, Kan Zha, Elena Florea
Misfiring or partial combustion during diesel engine operation results in the production of partial oxidation products such as ethylene (C₂H₄), carbon monoxide and aldehydes, in particular formaldehyde (HCHO). These compounds remain in the cylinder as residual gases to participate in the following engine cycle. Carbon monoxide and formaldehyde have been shown to exhibit a dual nature, retarding ignition in one temperature regime, yet decreasing ignition delay periods of hydrocarbon mixtures as temperatures exceed 1000°K. Largely unknown is the synergistic effects of such species. In this work, varying amounts of C₂H₄ and HCHO are added to the intake air of a naturally aspirated optical diesel engine and their combined effect on autoignition and subsequent combustion is examined. To observe the effect of these dopants on the low-temperature heat release (LTHR), ultraviolet chemiluminescent images are recorded using intensified CCD cameras.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1375
Yi Ding, Sonya Zanardelli, David Skalny, Laurence Toomey
Modern commercial and military vehicles are equipped with more electrical accessories and demand more power than ever before. This causes an increase in the weight of the battery as well as drives the battery to end of life when the vehicle is stationary with the engine off. Lithium ion batteries, which are known for their high power and energy to weight density, long cycle life, and low self-discharge rate, are considered to be an alternative for the replacement of existing Starting, Lighting, and Ignition (SLI) lead acid batteries. Lithium ion battery chemistry offers double the reserve time of the stock battery and a significantly greater number of charging and discharging cycles while providing weight savings. There is no acid inside a lithium ion battery to cause corrosion, which eliminates potential damage to a vehicle from chemical spills and poisonous gases.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1379
Jose Desantes, Vicente Bermudez, Antonio Garcia, Waldemar Linares, Christopher Kolodziej
In-cylinder emission control strategies, such as modifications of injection pressure and injection timing, have been used by researchers in order to reduce exhaust emissions and to comply with the legislation standards. Since some years ago post-injections have been studied and are well known as being efficient for soot emissions reduction. Although is well known that diesel gaseous and particle mass emissions have been reduced progressively over the last twenty years in response to the restrictive emission legislation and due to the application of new technologies The aim of this work is to help develop and understand the effect of the post-injection on diesel exhaust particle size distributions. The approach is to use a modern, well instrumented research engine equipped with a flexible high pressure fuel injection system. The results of this work are available to help provide guidelines for strategies to achieve reductions of the particle size distributions in diesel engines.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1376
Karl Bo Albert Mikkelsen, Steve Lambert
Electric energy storage is among the most significant hurdles to deployment of electric vehicles (EVs). Present storage methods struggle to provide the capacity and the service life demanded by automotive use. Hybrid energy storage systems (HESS) use a combination of storage types, for example, different types of batteries and ultracapacitors, to tailor the characteristics of the storage system to each application. In addition to sizing the system for the intended application, a suitable strategy for the integration of the energy storage system must be adopted. In the present application, a HESS has been designed for the electrification of a 2004 Chrysler Pacifica, through consideration of a combination of high capacity batteries, high power batteries, and capacitors. Hybrid storage systems using batteries alone, batteries and capacitors, and dual batteries have been considered.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1372
Kosuke Oguri, Naoki Maruno
A battery module structure and a battery management system that is optimal for the structure were developed, in order to facilitate the work of equipping hybrid cars with lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) that are expected to improve vehicle performance. This paper describes the structure of the LIB and the battery management system that is optimal for it. The battery module structure has cells with a sturdy holding structure and a highly efficient cooling system. The structure has enabled the improvement of battery pack system power output by 80% per unit weight and by 20% per unit volume compared to the previous model. The optimal management system prevents battery overcharge by detecting and controlling the state of charge (SOC) of each cell with a high degree of accuracy.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1380
Ji Zhang, Tiegang Fang
This paper investigates the combustion of biodiesel and diesel in an optical accessible constant volume chamber that can simulate the conditions in compression ignition engines. The high-pressure and high-temperature environment in the chamber was generated by a controlled premixed combustion with desired content of oxygen left. A common rail and an injector with 160 degree included angle were used to deliver the fuel. Ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and biodiesel from used cook oil were used in this paper. High speed imaging of natural luminosity from the flame was used to study the combustion flame in a time resolved manner. A combination of high speed and intensified imaging of OH chemiluminescence was employed to identify reaction zones. This method has the advantage of capturing the global pictures, thus allowing the studying of jet-to-jet variations, while it does not sacrifice the time-resolved resolution.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1373
Roland Matthe, Lance Turner, Horst Mettlach
Mid 2006 a study group at General Motors developed the concept for the electric vehicle with extended range (EREV),. The electric propulsion system should receive the electrical energy from a rechargeable energy storage system (RESS) and/or an auxiliary power unit (APU) which could either be a hydrogen fuel cell or an internal combustion engine (ICE) driven generator. The study result was the Chevrolet VOLT concept car in the North American Auto Show in Detroit in 2007. The paper describes the requirements, concepts, development and the performance of the battery used as RESS for the ICE type VOLTEC propulsion system version of the Chevrolet Volt. The key requirement for the RESS is to provide energy to drive an electric vehicle with “no compromised performance” for 40 miles. Extended Range Mode allows for this experience to continue beyond 40 miles.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1374
Manuel Fischnaller, Joachim Melbert, Sebastian Scharner, Tanja Eichner
A test center for aging analysis and characterization of Lithium-Ion batteries for automotive applications is optimized by means of a dedicated cell tester. The new power tester offers high current magnitude with fast rise time in order to generate arbitrary charge and discharge waveforms, which are identical to real power net signals in vehicles. Upcoming hybrid and electrical cars show fast current transients due to the implemented power electronics like inverter or DC/DC converter. The various test procedures consider single and coupled effects from current profile, state of charge and temperature. They are simultaneously applied on several cells in order to derive statistical significance. Comprehensive safely functions on both the hardware and the software level ensure proper operation of the complex system.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1420
Vittorio Ravaglioli, Davide Moro, Gabriele Serra, Fabrizio Ponti
In modern Diesel engine control strategies the guideline is to perform an efficient combustion control, mainly due to the increasing request to reduce pollutant emissions. Innovative control algorithms for optimal combustion positioning require the on-board evaluation of a large number of quantities. In order to perform closed-loop combustion control, one of the most important parameters to estimate on-board is MFB50, i.e. the angular position in which 50% of fuel mass burned within an engine cycle is reached. Furthermore, MFB50 allows determining the kind of combustion that takes place in the combustion chamber, therefore knowing such quantity is crucial for newly developed low temperature combustion applications (such as HCCI, HCLI, distinguished by very low NOx emissions). The aim of this work is to develop a virtual combustion sensor, that provides MFB50 estimated value as a function of quantities that can be monitored real-time by the Electronic Control Unit (ECU).
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1419
Nicolo Cavina, Enrico Corti, Luca Poggio, Daniele Zecchetti
The paper presents the development and real-time implementation of a combustion control system based on optimal management of multiple spark discharge events, in order to increase combustion stability, reduce pollutant emissions and fuel consumption, and avoid partial or missing combustion cycles. The proposed approach has been developed as a cost-effective solution to several combustion-related issues that affect Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines during cold start and part load operation. The problem of optimizing combustion efficiency and improving its stability during such operating modes is even more critical for high performance engines, which are designed to maximize charge efficiency especially at medium-high engine speeds.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1418
Seongeun Yu, Han Ho Song, Kyoungdoug Min, Hoimyung Choi, Sunghwan Cho, Kyoungchan Han
Emissions regulations are becoming more severe, and they remain a principal issue for vehicle manufacturers. Many engine subsystems and control technologies have been introduced to meet the demands of these regulations. For diesel engines, combustion control is one of the most effective approaches to reducing not only engine exhaust emissions but also cylinder-by-cylinder variation. However, the high cost of the pressure sensor and the complex engine head design for the extra equipment are stressful for the manufacturers. In this paper, a cylinder-pressure-based engine control logic is introduced for a multi-cylinder high speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine. The time for 50% of the mass fraction to burn (MFB50) and the IMEP are valuable for identifying combustion status. These two in-cylinder quantities are measured and applied to the engine control logic.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1417
Bastian Maass, Jiamei Deng, Richard Stobart
More and more stringent emission regulations require advanced control technologies for combustion engines. This goes along with increased monitoring requirements of engine behaviour. In case of emissions behaviour and fuel consumption the actual combustion efficiency is of highest interest. A key parameter of combustion conditions is the in-cylinder pressure during engine cycle. The measurement and detection is difficult and cost intensive. Hence, modelling of in-cylinder conditions is a promising approach for finding optimum control behaviour. However, on-line controller design requires real-time scenarios which are difficult to model and current modelling approaches are either time consuming or inaccurate. This paper presents a new approach of in-cylinder condition prediction. Rather than reconstructing in-cylinder pressure signals from vibration transferred signals through cylinder heads or rods this approach predicts the conditions.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1424
Adrian P. Lee
Full-toroidal traction drives (IVT, TCVT & TVAD) have demonstrated a significant fuel economy, emissions and cost benefits across a diverse range of applications. However, increasing emphasis is being placed on power density and endurance limits, hence additional demands are being placed on the ability of the variator elements and traction fluid to withstand the heavily loaded rolling contact fatigue conditions within the variator. This paper describes the experimental work done to demonstrate the high temperature durability of traction fluid and variator disc and roller material. In addition, the latest fatigue endurance limit testing results are presented which provide further evidence of traction fluid ‘fill for life’
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1423
Joachim Foth
The megatrends "reduction of emissions" and "fuel consumption reduction" play a predominant role in the development of powertrains. For transit buses this implies both the reduction of emissions and pollutions of the internal combustion engine, and, on the other hand, a further reduction of noise and brake dust. Also very important is the reduction of both fuel consumption and CO₂ emissions. For all these targets the actual developments on the engine side have led to great improvements in the last decades, but what can be mentioned for the other components of the powertrain, especially looking for transmissions? First of all the relevant trends for transit buses have to be considered: A large increase of the torque of the combustion engines during the last years has a big impact on the development of transmissions for buses.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1422
Ying Huang, Fuyuan Yang, Minggao Ouyang, Lin Chen, Xueqing Yang
In-cylinder pressure sensor, which provides the means for precise combustion control to achieve improved fuel economy, lower emissions, higher comfort, additional diagnostic functions etc., is becoming a necessity in future diesel engines, especially for chemical-kinetics dominated PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) or LTC (Low Temperature Combustion) engines. In this paper, new control strategy is investigated to utilize in-cylinder pressure information into engine start process, in order to guarantee the success of engine start and in the meantime prevent penalty of fuel economy or pollutant emissions due to excessive fuel injection. An engine start acceleration model is established to analyze the engine start process. “In-cylinder Combustion Analysis Tool” (i-CAT), is used to acquire and process the in-cylinder pressure data and deliver the combustion indices to ECU (Engine Control Unit). Feedback control is accomplished in ECU based on this information.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 1255

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