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Viewing 1 to 30 of 316
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2820
Rong Ma, Chao He, Jiaqiang Li
A simulation model of catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) is established based on the CFD software FIRE and has been validated through a series of experimental comparison. This model simulates the CDPF continuous regeneration process, and the factors that influence the exhaust NO2 concentration from CDPF including oxygen concentration, exhaust temperature, space velocity, proportion of NO2/NOX and soot mass fraction are studied. The results show that the higher oxygen concentration causes an increase in NO2/NOX. The NO2/NOX is significantly increased when the exhaust temperature is about 350 °C based on the simulation conditions when the inlet oxygen concentration is at 5.79% and the space velocity is 7s−1. The space velocity in a certain degree leads to higher NO2/NOX. For the soot mass, there is no significant influence of increasing proportion of the NO2/NOX.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2819
S. F. Benjamin, C. A. Roberts
Abstract In an attempt to reduce particulate and NOx emissions from Diesel exhaust, the combined DPF and SCR filter is now frequently chosen as the preferred catalyst. When this device functions effectively it saves valuable packaging space in a passenger vehicle. As part of its development, modelling of its emissions performance is essential. Single channel modelling would seem to be the obvious choice for an SCRF because of its complex internal geometry. This, however, can be computationally demanding if modelling the full monolith. For a normal flow-through catalyst monolith the porous medium approach is an attractive alternative as it accounts for non-uniform inlet conditions without the need to model every channel. This paper attempts to model an SCRF by applying the porous medium approach. The model is essentially 1D but as with all porous medium models, can very easily be applied to 3D cases once developed and validated.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2818
Mohammad Reza Hamedi, Athanasios Tsolakis, Jose Martin Herreros
Abstract Recent developments in diesel engines lead to increased fuel efficiency and reduced exhaust gas temperature. Therefore more energy efficient aftertreatment systems are required to comply with tight emission regulations. In this study, a computational fluid dynamics package was used to investigate the thermal behaviour of a diesel aftertreatment system. A parametric study was carried out to identify the most influential pipework material and insulation characteristics in terms of thermal performance. In the case of the aftertreatment pipework and canning material effect, an array of different potential materials was selected and their effects on the emission conversion efficiency of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) were numerically investigated over a driving cycle. Results indicate that although the pipework material's volumetric heat capacity was decreased by a factor of four, the total emission reduction was only considerable during the cold start.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2817
Kenan Muric, Ola Stenlaas, Per Tunestal, Bengt Johansson
In the last couple of decades, countries have enacted new laws concerning environmental pollution caused by heavy-duty commercial and passenger vehicles. This is done mainly in an effort to reduce smog and health impacts caused by the different pollutions. One of the legislated pollutions, among a wide range of regulated pollutions, is nitrogen oxides (commonly abbreviated as NOx). The SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) was introduced in the automotive industry to reduce NOx emissions leaving the vehicle. The basic idea is to inject a urea solution (AdBlue™) in the exhaust gas before the gas enters the catalyst. The optimal working temperature for the catalyst is somewhere in the range of 300 to 400 °C. For the reactions to occur without a catalyst, the gas temperature has to be at least 800 °C. These temperatures only occur in the engine cylinder itself, during and after the combustion.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2824
Piotr Bielaczyc, Andrzej Szczotka, Joseph Woodburn
Abstract Ethanol has a long history as an automotive fuel and is currently used in various blends and formats as a fuel for spark ignition engines in many areas of the world. The addition of ethanol to petrol has been shown to reduce certain types of emissions, but increase others. This paper presents the results of a detailed experimental program carried out under standard laboratory conditions to determine the influence of different quantities of petrol-ethanol blends (E5, E10, E25, E50 and E85) on the emission of regulated and unregulated gaseous pollutants and particulate matter. The ethanol-petrol blends were laboratory tested in two European passenger cars on a chassis dynamometer over the New European Driving Cycle, using a constant volume sampler and analyzers for quantification of both regulated and unregulated emissions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2823
Norifumi Mizushima, Daisuke Kawano, Hajime Ishii, Yutaka Takada, Susumu Sato
Abstract Widespread use of biofuels for automobiles would greatly reduce CO2 emissions and increase resource recycling, contributing to global environmental conservation. In fact, activities for expanding the production and utilization of biofuels are already proceeding throughout the world. For diesel vehicles, generally, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) made from vegetable oils is used as a biodiesel. In recent years, hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) has also become increasingly popular. In addition, biomass to liquid (BTL) fuel, which can be made from any kinds of biomass by gasification and Fischer-Tropsch process, is expected to be commercialized in the future. On the other hand, emission regulations in each country have been tightened year by year. In accordance with this, diesel engines have complied with the regulations with advanced technologies such as common-rail fuel injection system, high pressure turbocharger, EGR and aftertreatment system.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2822
Achinta Varna, Konstantinos Boulouchos, Alexander Spiteri, Panayotis Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Yuri M. Wright
Simulations for a pressure-assisted multi-stream injector designed for urea-dosing in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) exhaust gas system have been carried out and compared to measurements taken in an optically accessible high-fidelity flow test rig. The experimental data comprises four different combinations of mass flow rate and temperature for the gas stream with unchanged injection parameters for the spray. First, a parametric study is carried out to determine the importance of various spray sub-models, including atomization, spray-wall interaction, buoyancy as well as droplet coalescence. Optimal parameters are determined using experimental data for one reference operating condition.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2821
Jonathan Stewart, Roy Douglas, Alexandre Goguet, Cristina Elena Stere, Luke Blades
Abstract One of the most critical aspects in the development of a kinetic model for automotive applications is the method used to control the switch between limiting factors over the period of the chemical reaction, namely mass transfer and reaction kinetics. This balance becomes increasingly more critical with the automotive application with the gas composition and gas flow varying throughout the automotive cycles resulting in a large number of competing reactions, with a constantly changing space velocity. A methodology is presented that successfully switches the limitation between mass transfer and reaction kinetics. This method originally developed for the global kinetics model using the Langmuir Hinshelwood approach for kinetics is presented. The methodology presented is further expanded to the much more complex micro-kinetics approach taking into account various kinetic steps such as adsorption/desorption and surface reactions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2811
Michal Vojtisek-Lom, Martin Pechout, Michael Fenkl
Abstract The paper focuses on portable “on-board” instrumentation and methods for evaluation of exhaust emissions from scooters and various small machinery under real-world driving conditions. Two approaches are investigated here. In one, a miniature on-board system mounted on the equipment itself performs online measurements of the concentrations of the pollutants of interest (HC, CO, CO2, NOx, some property of particulate matter), and measurement or computation of the intake air flow. This approach has been used on a 50 cm3 scooter fitted with a 14-kg on-board system and driven on local routes. Measured concentrations of gaseous compounds, particle mass and total particle length were multiplied with the corresponding intake air flow computed from measured engine rpm, intake air manifold pressure and temperature. In the second approach, a full-flow dilution tunnel, gas analyzers and particle measurement or sampling devices are mounted on an accompanying hand cart or vehicle.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2810
Kihyung Joo, Jin Woo Park, Jin-ha Lee, Seok-Jae Kim, Seungbeom Yoo
Abstract In diesel engine development, the new technology is coming out to meet the stringent exhaust emission regulation. The regulation demands more eco-friendly vehicles. Euro6c demands to meet not only WLTP mode, but also RDE(Real Driving Emission). In order to satisfy RDE mode, the new technology to reduce emissions should cover all operating areas including High Load & High Speed. It is a big challenge to reduce NOx on the RDE mode and a lot of DeNOx technologies are being developed. So the new DeNOx technology is needed to cover widened operating area and strict acceleration / deacceleration. The existing LNT(Lean NOx Trap) and Urea SCR(Selective Catalytic Reduction) is necessary to meet the typical NEDC or WLTP, but the RDE mode demands the powerful DeNOx technology. Therefore, the LNT & Urea SCR on DPF was developed through this study.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2809
Kohei Yoshida, Yusuke Nozaki, Toshihiro Mori, Yuki Bisaiji, Yuki Haba, Kazuhiro Umemoto, Takao Fukuma
Abstract In this paper, a control strategy to switch NSR (NOx storage and reduction) function from standard DeNOx by rich combustion to DiAir (Diesel NOx After-treatment by Adsorbed Intermediate Reductants) and additional advantages to use HCI (Hydrocarbon Injector) during desulfation were introduced. Investigations under a transient cycle suggest that NOx conversion with DiAir is strongly affected by preliminary NOx storage condition in the NSR catalyst. To avoid NOx breakthrough just after starting HC dosing for DiAir, a rich operation to reduce stored NOx was shown to be important and high NOx conversion could be maintained using this control strategy under a transient cycle. Furthermore, by combining HCI and in-cylinder post injection, usage of rich condition for NSR DeSOx can be expand to wider engine speed and load area.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2816
Ossi Kaario, Teemu Sarjovaara, Olli Ranta, Tuomo Hulkkonen, Karri Keskinen, Martti Larmi, Sauli Halonen, Arno Amberla
Abstract A novel high pressure SCR spray system is investigated both experimentally and numerically. RANS simulations are performed using Star-CD and polyhedral meshing. This is one of the first studies to compare droplet breakup models and AdBlue injection with high injection pressure (Pinj=200 bar). The breakup models compared are the Reitz-Diwakar (RD), the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KHRT), and the Enhanced Taylor Analogy Breakup (ETAB) model. The models are compared with standard model parameters typically used in diesel fuel injection studies to assess their performance without any significant parameter tuning. Experimental evidence from similar systems seems to be scarce on high pressure AdBlue (or water) sprays using plain hole nozzles. Due to this, it is difficult to estimate a realistic droplet size distribution accurately. Thereby, there is potential for new experimental data to be made with high pressure AdBlue or water sprays.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2815
Anders Widd, Magnus Lewander
Abstract The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst with ammonia as reducing agent plays a central role in today's exhaust after-treatment systems for heavy-duty vehicles and there is a wide selection of possible catalytic materials to use. In order to facilitate the design of future catalysts, several aspects of the materials must be evaluated both in steady-state and transient operation. To this end, this paper presents a methodology for comparing the dynamic properties of different catalysts using full-size engine testing. The studied characteristics include the ammonia storage capacity, the effect of starting with an empty catalyst, the transient response to temperature gradients and changes in the urea dosing level. The temperature response is of particular importance in transient operation, where temperature increases may lead to substantial ammonia slip.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2814
Andrew Pedlow, Geoffrey McCullough, Alexandre Goguet, Ken Hansen
Abstract Mathematical modelling has become an essential tool in the design of modern catalytic systems. Emissions legislation is becoming increasingly stringent, and so mathematical models of aftertreatment systems must become more accurate in order to provide confidence that a catalyst will convert pollutants over the required range of conditions. Automotive catalytic converter models contain several sub-models that represent processes such as mass and heat transfer, and the rates at which the reactions proceed on the surface of the precious metal. Of these sub-models, the prediction of the surface reaction rates is by far the most challenging due to the complexity of the reaction system and the large number of gas species involved.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2812
Ahmad Khalfan, Hu Li, Gordon Andrews
Abstract The tailpipe exhaust emissions were measured using a EURO4 emissions compliant SI car equipped with on-board measurement systems such as a FTIR system for gaseous emission, a differential GPS for velocity, altitude and position, thermal couples for temperatures, and a MAX fuel meter for transient fuel consumption. Various nitrogen species emissions (NO, NO2, NOx, NH3, HCN and N2O) were measured at 0.5 Hz. The tests were designed and employed using two real world driving cycles/routes representing a typical urban road network located in a densely populated area and main crowded road. Journeys at various times of the day were conducted to investigate traffic conditions impacts such as traffic and pedestrian lights, road congestion, grade and turning on emissions, engine thermal efficiency and fuel consumption. The time aligned vehicle moving parameters with Nitrogen pollutant emission data and fuel consumption enabled the micro-analysis of correlations between these parameters.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2837
Jinyoung Jang, Young-Jae Lee, Ohseok Kwon, Minseob Lee, Jeonghwan Kim
Abstract This study focused on the effect of engine oils on regulated emissions, particulates and fuel economy. Three engine oils of the same SAE grade (synthetic oil with poly alpha olefins (PAOs), Group III base oil, and Group III genuine oil with additive package) were used in one gasoline and one diesel vehicle. A GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) vehicle and a diesel vehicle without DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) were selected because those vehicles obviously emit more particulates than port-injection gasoline vehicles and diesel vehicles with DPF. A combined mode consisting of the US EPA emission test cycles FTP-75 and HWFET was used for these tests. HORIBA and PIERBURG gas analyzers were used to measure regulated emissions and fuel economy, respectively. Unregulated emissions and particulates were analyzed by FTIR and PPM-S, respectively. Samples (300 ml) of test engine oil were taken periodically just after each test, and the colors of the sampled oil compared.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2838
Xiangang Wang, Zhangsong Zhan, Tiegang Hu, Zuohua Huang
Abstract Performance and particulate emissions of a modern common-rail and turbocharged diesel engine fueled with diesel and biodiesel fuels were comparatively studied. An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) was employed to measure particle size distribution and number concentration. Two biodiesel fuels, BDFs (biodiesel from soybean oil) and BDFc (biodiesel from used cooking oil), as well as ultra-low sulfur diesel were used. The study shows that biodiesels give higher thermal efficiency than diesel. Biodiesels give obviously lower exhaust gas temperature than diesel under high engine speed. The differences in fuel consumption, thermal efficiency and exhaust gas temperature between BDFs and BDFc are negligible. The first peaks of heat release rate for biodiesels are lower than that of diesel, while the second peaks are higher and advanced for biodiesels. BDFs show slightly slower heat release than BDFc during the first heat release stage at low engine speed.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2839
Christophe Barro, Philipp Meyer, Konstantinos Boulouchos
Abstract Past research has shown that post injections have the potential to reduce Diesel engine exhaust PM concentration without any significant influence in the NOx emissions. In earlier research it was observed that soot reduction due to a post injection is based on three reasons: increased turbulence (1) and heat (2) from the post injection during soot oxidation and lower soot formation due to smaller main injection for similar load conditions (3). The second effect of heat addition during the soot oxidation is debated in the literature. The experimental investigation presented in the current work provides insight into the underlying mechanisms of soot formation and reduction using post injections under different operating conditions. The experimental data have been obtained using a cylindrical constant volume chamber with high optical access. The soot evolution has been obtained using 2-color-pyrometry.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2840
Juan J. Hernández, Rosario Ballesteros, Javier Barba, José Guillén-Flores
Abstract In order to reduce the pollutant emissions (NOx and PM) of diesel engines, the addition of small gaseous fuel amounts or dual mode operation have been proved as potential techniques. This paper is focused on a detailed characterization of the particles emitted from a single cylinder diesel engine when part of the diesel fuel (5 to 20% by energy) is replaced by a gaseous fuel (producer gas, mainly composed by H2, CO, CH4 and inert compounds) coming from biomass steam gasification. The engine was run at constant speed and torque and different EGR rates. Particle samples were collected by means of fiber glass filters placed in a dilution mini-tunnel. Simultaneously, during tests, part of the exhaust gas was conducted to an SMPS to determine the particle size distribution.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2841
Jing Qin, Xiang Li, Yiqiang Pei
Abstract The aim of this research is to experimentally investigate the effects of combustion parameters [ignition timings, injection timings, excess air ratio (λ)] and lubricating oil on particulate matter (PM) emissions from a 2.0 L turbo-charged gasoline direct injection (T-GDI) engine fueled with gasoline (octane number = 97), methanol/gasoline blends and pure methanol. The results of this paper show that the PM number concentration mostly presents a typical bimodal distribution in figures. The particle number concentration mainly concentrates in the nucleation mode. With the increase of methanol volume fraction in the blended fuel, the PM emissions decrease significantly. Furthermore, there are few particles when the engine fueled with pure methanol. As advancing ignition timing, the total PM number rises by over about 200%. Under the pre-ignition condition, the higher in-cylinder temperature may also accelerate the formation of the nucleation mode particles.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2843
Dave OudeNijeweme, Paul Freeland, Markus Behringer, Pavlos Aleiferis
Abstract Particulate emissions are of growing concern due to health impacts. Many urban areas around the world currently have particulate matter levels exceeding the World Health Organisation safe limits. Gasoline engines, especially when equipped with direct injection systems, contribute to this pollution. In recognition of this fact European limits on particulate mass and number are being introduced. A number of ways to meet these new stringent limits have been under investigation. The focus of this paper is on particulate emissions reduction through improvements in fuel delivery. This investigation is part of the author's ongoing particulate research and development that includes optical engine spray and combustion visualisation, CFD method development, engine and vehicle testing with the aim to move particulate emission development upstream in the development process.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2845
Jianye Su, Min Xu, Peng Yin, Yi Gao, David Hung
Abstract Spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) gasoline engine, especially in downsized boosted engine platform, has proven to be one of the most promising concepts to improve vehicle fuel economy. SIDI engines are also getting a larger share of the gasoline engine market which is traditionally dominated by the port fuel injection (PFI) engines in the U.S., European and Chinese vehicles. However, higher particle number emissions associated with operating the engine at higher loads pose additional challenges for meeting future stringent emissions regulations. In this study, the potential of using multiple injection strategies (double injection and triple injection strategy during the intake stroke in homogeneous combustion mode) to reduce particle number emissions in a 2.0 liter boosted SIDI gasoline engine at 1000 rpm, 11 bar BMEP condition was investigated using Horiba MEXA SPCS1000 PN measurement instrument.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2844
Matthias Stark, Richard Mittler
Abstract Understanding tribodynamic effects is crucial when aiming to reduce lube oil consumption and related exhaust gas emissions. This report briefly describes the lubrication concept of large two stroke marine diesel engines and different contributors to the lube oil balance of such an engine. Addressing possible measures to influence the contribution of lubrication system parameters on exhaust gas emissions requires a detailed analysis of possible actions to achieve the expected improvement. Activities to enhance lubrication system performance concentrate on: Modifications of relevant engine components The application of experimentally gained data to support computational simulation models The application of suitable validation approaches This report in particular highlights piston ring pack optimizations on basis of computational simulation.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2827
Kristin Götz, Anja Singer, Olaf Schröder, Christoph Pabst, Axel Munack, Jürgen Bünger, Jürgen Krahl
Abstract One political and economic aim in Europe is to increase the use of renewable energy resources. In the transport sector, up to 10 % of fossil diesel fuel should be replaced by biogenic fuels by 2020. This also means a reduction in crude oil dependency. In the area of diesel fuel, fatty acid methyl esters are introduced since over 20 years as biodiesel. However, biodiesel can lead to an increase of engine oil dilution in passenger cars with diesel particulate filters. During the regeneration of the particulate filters, there is an entry of fuel components in the engine oil. While most of the diesel fuel (DF) evaporates from the engine oil, biodiesel remains in the oil and can cause sludge formation in the engine. A promising approach to reduce this problem is the use of a new type of biogenic fuel, called hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO). This is also produced from vegetable oil or animal fat. Like biodiesel, HVO is free of sulfur and any aromatics.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2826
Jon Andersson, John May, Cecile Favre, Dirk Bosteels, Simon de Vries, Matthew Heaney, Matthew Keenan, Jonathon Mansell
Abstract The exhaust emissions of two Euro 6 diesel cars with different emissions control systems have been evaluated both on the road and over various chassis dynamometer test cycles. European emissions limits are currently set using the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), but the European Commission is preparing additional test procedures to ensure that emissions are well controlled both in real-world use and over the legislative test cycle. The main focus of this work on ‘Real Driving Emissions’ (RDE) is on measurements using Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS) in truly representative, on-road, driving. A key focus of the test programme, undertaken as a collaboration between AECC (the Association for Emissions Control by Catalyst) and Ricardo UK, was therefore the use of PEMS systems to measure on-road emissions of both gaseous pollutants and particulate matter. This included measurement of particle number emissions with a new candidate system for this type of measurement.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2830
Amar Deep, Naveen Kumar, Ashish Karnwal, Dhruv Gupta, Vipul Vibhanshu, Abhishek Sharma, Jitesh Singh Patel
Abstract The interest of using alternative fuels in diesel engines has been accelerated exponentially due to a foreseen scarcity in world petroleum reserves, increase in the prices of the conventional fossil fuels and restrictions on exhaust emissions such as greenhouse gases from internal combustion (IC) engines initiated by environmental concerns. The constant trade-off between efficiency and emissions should be in proper balance with the conventional fuels in a fuel design process for future combustors. Unlike gasoline and diesel, alcohols act as oxygenated fuels. Adding alcohols to petroleum products allows the fuel to combust properly due to the presence of oxygen, which enhances premixed combustion phase, improves the diffusive combustion phase which increases the combustion efficiency and reduces air pollution. The higher activation energy of alcohols leads to better resistance to engine knocking that allows higher compression ratios and greater engine thermal efficiencies.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2832
Barouch Giechaskiel, Giorgio Martini
Abstract In the current heavy-duty engine and light-duty diesel vehicle exhaust emission legislation Particle Number (PN) limits for solid particles >23 nm are prescribed. The legislation was extended to include Gasoline Direct Injection (G-DI) vehicles since September 2014 and will be applied to Non-Road Mobile Machinery engines in the future. However there are concerns transferring the same methodology to other engine technologies, where higher concentration of sub-23 nm particles might exist. This paper focuses on the capabilities of existing PN measurement equipment on measuring solid particles smaller than 23 nm.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2833
Kotaro Tanaka, Masatoshi Takano, Shuji Iimura, Kai Miyamura, Mitsuru Konno
Abstract Recently, highly sensitive near-IR laser absorption spectrometers have been employed to measure ammonia (NH3) emissions. These instruments allow in-situ measurements of highly time-resolved NH3 emission levels in automobile exhaust. However, the effect of the automobile exhaust CO2 in NH3 measurements has not been studied in detail. Because the CO2 concentration in automobile exhaust is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than the NH3 concentration, there is a possibility that spectral overlap by CO2 lines and/or the spectral broadening of NH3 by CO2 could affect the measured NH3 levels. This study had two major objectives. First, the effect of CO2 on the measured NH3 concentration was assessed using our developed near-IR laser absorption spectrometer. The second objective was to provide on-board NH3 measurements in the hybrid gasoline automobile exhaust using the developed spectrometer.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2834
Barouch Giechaskiel, Urbano Manfredi, Giorgio Martini
Abstract In the current diesel vehicle exhaust emissions legislation Particle Number (PN) limits for solid particles >23 nm are prescribed. The legislation was extended to include Gasoline Direct Injection (G-DI) vehicles since September 2014. Target of this paper was to investigate whether smaller than 23 nm solid particles are emitted from engines in considerable concentration focusing on G-DI engines. The literature survey and the experimental investigation of >15 vehicles showed that engines emit solid sub-23 nm particles. The average percentage over a test cycle for G-DIs (30-40%) is similar to diesel engines. These percentages are relatively low considering the emission limit levels (6×1011 p/km) and the repeatability (10-20%) of the particle number method. These percentages are slightly higher compared to the percentages expected theoretically not to be counted due to the 23 nm cut-off size (5-15%).
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2857
Jose Serrano, Pablo Olmeda, Francisco Arnau, Artem Dombrovsky
Abstract These days many research efforts on internal combustion engines are centred on optimising turbocharger matching and performance on the engine. In the last years a number of studies have pointed out the strong effect on turbocharger behaviour of heat transfer phenomena. The main difficulty for taking into account these phenomena comes from the little information provided by turbocharger manufacturers. In this background, Original Engine Manufacturers (OEM) need general engineering tools able to provide reasonably precise results in predicting the mentioned heat transfer phenomena. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to provide a procedure, applicable to small automotive turbochargers, able to predict the heat transfer characteristics that can be used in a lumped 1D turbocharger heat transfer model. This model must be suitable to work coupled to whole-engine simulation codes (such as GT-Power or Ricardo WAVE) for being used in global engine models by the OEM.
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