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Viewing 1 to 30 of 194
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2581
Scott Eberhardt
Abstract World War 1 began with the airplane as a frail, unarmed means of observing enemy troop movements and ended with the airplane as a powerful, much more evolved weapon of war. There were specialized roles for fighter, bomber and ground attack aircraft as well as newly developed aerial strategies and tactics for operational effectiveness. Many aircraft design technologies greatly matured during the war. Four will be the subject of this paper: Drag reduction, aircraft handling qualities, stability and control, airfoil design technology, and structures design technology. Propulsion and armament also matured greatly but are not discussed in the paper. The discussion of drag reduction will illustrate the innovations of the British on external wire bracing drag, the French on cowl design and the Germans on cantilevered wings and induced drag.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2580
David Lednicer
Abstract During the 1930s and 1940s, aircraft designers worked on developing novel design features. Some of these features worked and are commonplace today. Other features fell by the wayside and have been forgotten. These novel design features include laminar flow wings, low-drag cooling systems, buried propulsion systems, canard configurations, jet engines, break-away wing tips, pressure cabins and swept wings. The development and applications of these features will be examined. Specific technical details of these applications will be included in this examination. For the design features that fell by the wayside, the reasons for this outcome will be discussed
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2579
Brandon Todd Buerge
Abstract While operational airships globally number in the low dozens, interest in buoyant or semi-buoyant platforms continues to arouse imaginations of commercial and military planners and developers alike. The airship-as-advertisement business model is the only model that has proven sustainable on any scale since the crash of the initially successful LZ-128 Hindenburg effectively ended regular passenger and cargo transport by airship, and the 1962 termination of the US Naval airship program terminated regular large-scale surveillance from airships. Efforts in the US and Japan during the 2000's to have a self-sustaining sight-seeing business model using the modern semi-rigid Zeppelin NT both failed. In theory, the buoyant nature of airships provides compelling endurance and cost-per-ton-mile capability which fills a niche arguably not currently occupied by other modes of transportation.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2578
Alessandro Ceruti, Piergiovanni Marzocca
Abstract The flight simulation of airships and hot air balloons usually considers the envelope geometry as a fixed shape, whose volume is eventually reduced by ballonets. However, the dynamic pressure or helium leaks in airships, and the release of air to allow descent in hot air balloons can significantly change the shape of the envelope leading to potential dangerous situations. In fact, in case of semi-rigid and non-rigid airships a reduction in envelope internal pressure can reduce the envelope bending stiffness leading to the loss of the typical axial-symmetric shape. For hot air balloons thing goes even worse since the lost of internal pressure can lead to the collapsing of the balloon shape to a sort of vertically stretched geometry (similar to a torch) which is not able to sustain the attached basket and its payload.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2576
Vasu Kumar, Vishvendra Tomar, Naveen Kumar, Samarth Jain
Abstract The Aerofoil theory along with its design has integrated itself into the vast areas of applications ranging from Automobile, Aeronautical, Wind Turbine, Micro-Vehicles, UAVs applications. In this paper, knowing the intricacy of the airfoil's applications, A MATLAB Code for NACA-2415 Airfoil is developed and a Model with dimensions c=180mm, w=126mm, tmax=27mm is generated. The model is then subjected to Flow Simulation with various input parameters: Reynolds Numbers taken are- (REN-1) 105 and (REN-2) 2×105 [Laminar External Flow], Angles of attack taken are-0°, 4°, 8°, 12°. The pressure and velocity distribution along the airfoil sketch curve are graphed qualitatively, emphasizing on the flow separation leading to the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The various aerodynamics characteristic curves for coefficient of pressure, coefficient of lift and coefficient of drag are plotted against different angle of attacks for REN-1 and REN-2.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2577
Alessandro Ceruti, Piergiovanni Marzocca, Vitaly Voloshin
Abstract The aim of this paper is to develop a new concept of unconventional airship based on morphing a lenticular shape while preserving the volumetric dimension. Lenticular shape is known to have relatively poor aerodynamic characteristics. It is also well known to have poor static and dynamic stability after the certain critical speed. The new shape presented in this paper is obtained by extending one and reducing the other direction of the original lenticular shape. The volume is kept constant through the morphing process. To improve the airship performance, four steps of morphing, starting from the lenticular shape, were obtained and compared in terms of aerodynamic characteristics, including drag, lift and pitching moment, and stability characteristics for two different operational scenarios. The comparison of the stability was carried out based on necessary deflection angle of the part of tail surface.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2575
Swen Noelting, Ehab Fares
Abstract An overview of the theory and applications of the Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) is presented in this paper. LBM has gained a reputation over the past decade as a viable alternative to traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based methods for the solution of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications in the aerospace and automotive industries. The theoretical background of the method is presented and the key differentiators to traditional RANS methods are summarized. We then look at current and potential future applications of CFD in the aerospace industry and identify a number of areas where the limitations of RANS tools, in particular with regard to unsteady flows and the handling of complex geometries, prevent a deeper penetration of CFD into product development processes in the aerospace industry.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2574
Nicholas R. Motahari, Franklin Turbeville, Nandeesh Hiremath, Narayanan Komerath
Abstract The interest in flying cars comes with the question of characterizing aerodynamic loads on shapes that go beyond traditional aircraft shapes. When carried as slung loads under aircraft, vehicles can encounter severe aerodynamic loads, which may also cause them to go into divergent oscillations that can threaten the vehicle and aircraft. Slung loads can encounter the wind at arbitrary attitudes. Flight test certification for every vehicle-aircraft combination is prohibitive. Characterizing the aerodynamic loads with sufficient resolution for use in dynamic simulation, has in the past been extremely arduous. Sharp changes that drive instabilities arise over small ranges of yaw and pitch. With the Continuous Rotation technique developed by our group, aerodynamic load characterization is viable and efficient. With two well-chosen attitude sweeps and appropriate transformations, the entire 6-DOF load map can be obtained, for several rates.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2572
Nikolaus Thorell, Nicholas R. Motahari, Narayanan Komerath
Abstract At high angles of attack, the flow over a swept wing generates counter-rotating vortical features. These features can amplify into a nearly sinusoidal fluctuation of velocity components. The result is excitation of twin-fin buffeting, driven at clearly predictable frequencies, or at nearby lock-in frequencies of the fin structure. This is distinct from the traditional model of fin buffeting as a structural resonant response to broadband, large-amplitude excitation from vortex core bursting. Hot-film anemometry was conducted ahead of the vertical fins of a 1:48 scale model of the F-35B aircraft, in the angle of attack range between 18 and 30 degrees. Auto spectral density functions from these data showed a sharp spectral peak in the flow ahead of the fins for angles of attack between 20 and 28 degrees. Small fences placed on the top surface of the wing eliminated the spectral peak, leaving only a broadband turbulent spectrum.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2573
Kyle J. Forster, Tracie Barber, Sammy Diasinos, Graham Doig
Abstract Streamwise vortices can be observed to interact in a number of real world scenarios. Vortex generators operating in boundary layers, as well as aircraft flying in formation can produce vortex interactions with multiple streamwise vortices in close proximity to each other. The tracking of these vortex paths as well as the location and nature of their breakdown is critical to determining how the structures can be used to aid flow control, and how large scale turbulence develops from them. Six configurations of two NACA0012 vanes were evaluated computationally to observe the interactions of a pre-existing vortex with a vortex generated downstream. Co and counter-rotating configurations at three different lateral spacings were used to vary vortex position and impingement on the rear vane.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2570
Brandon Liberi, Praditukrit Kijjakarn, Narayanan Komerath
Abstract Loads slung under aircraft can go into divergent oscillations coupling multiple degrees of freedom. Predicting the highest safe flight speed for a vehicle-load combination is a critical challenge, both for military missions over hostile areas, and for evacuation/rescue operations. The primary difficulty was that of obtaining well-resolved airload maps covering the arbitrary attitudes that a slung load may take. High speed rotorcraft using tilting rotors and co-axial rotors can fly at speeds that imply high dynamic pressure, making aerodynamic loads significant even on very dense loads such as armored vehicles, artillery weapons, and ammunition. The Continuous Rotation method demonstrated in our prior work enables routine prediction of divergence speeds. We build on prior work to explore the prediction of divergence speed for practical configurations such as military vehicles, which often have complex bluff body shapes.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2571
Cornelis Bil, Man Chiu Fung, Sherman C.P. Cheung, Piergiovanni Marzocca
Abstract This paper introduces the Seabus SB-8, a new Wing-In-Ground-Effect (WIGE) craft designed for 8 - 10 passengers. The craft will be used for fast transportation across Port Phillip Bay in Melbourne, Australia. With a cruise speed of about 140 km/hr, it can cross the bay in 30 min as compared to 75 min for land transportation. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted on the design to determine aerodynamic properties at various angles of attack and operating heights. The influence of ground effect was also determined as well as the effect of Centre of Gravity (CG) position on longitudinal stability. Using flow visualization areas of potential flow separation were identified and interactions of wake vortices with different parts of the aircraft were determined. Note that some aspects of the design are proprietary.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2568
Michele Castellani, Yves Lemmens, Jonathan Cooper
Abstract Flight loads calculations play a fundamental role in the development and certification of an aircraft and have an impact on the structural sizing and weight. The number of load cases required by the airworthiness regulations is in the order of tens of thousands and the analysis must be repeated for each design iteration. On large aircraft, CS-25 explicitly requires taking into account for loads prediction, airframe flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics and interaction of systems and structure, leading to computationally expensive numerical models. Thus there is a clear benefit in speeding-up this calculation process. This paper presents a methodology aiming to significantly reduce the computational time to predict loads due to gust and maneuvers. The procedure is based on Model Order Reduction, whose goal is the generation of a Reduced Order Model (ROM) able to limit the computational cost compared to a full analysis whilst retaining accuracy.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2569
Georges Ghazi, Ruxandra Botez
Abstract During aircraft development, mathematical models are elaborated from our knowledge of fundamental physical laws. Those models are used to gain knowledge in order to make the best decisions at all development stages. Depending on the application, different models can be used to describe, in one way or another, the aircraft behavior. The goal of this paper is to develop a high-fidelity aircraft simulation model that is exceptionally capable, flexible and responsive to the needs of the researchers. The proposed model includes nonlinear aerodynamic coefficients, a generic engine model and a complete autopilot with auto-landing. The simulation model has been designed to help researchers develop and validate new algorithms for trajectory optimization, control design, stability analysis and parameter estimation. To make it easy to use, the simulation model also includes algorithms for stability and control analysis.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2566
Reuben Chandrasekharan, Nick Iarocci, Sherry Vafa, Iyad Akel
Abstract The Learjet 85 is a business jet with an unpowered manual elevator control and is designed for a maximum dive Mach number of 0.89. During the early design, it was found that the stick force required for a 1.5g pull-up from a dive would exceed the limit set by FAA regulations. A design improvement of the tailplane was initiated, using 2D and 3D Navier-Stokes CFD codes. It was discovered that a small amount of positive camber could reduce the elevator hinge moment for the same tail download at high Mach numbers. This was the result of the stabilizer forebody carrying more of the tail download and the elevator carrying less. Consequently, the elevator hinge-moment during recovery from a high-speed dive was lower than for the original tail. Horizontal tails are conventionally designed with zero or negative camber since a positive camber can have adverse effects on tail stall and drag.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2567
Dushyant Kaliyari, Khadeeja Nusrath TK, Jatinder Singh
Abstract Aerodynamic database update from the flight tests using system identification techniques is a crucial tool for the development of control laws and high fidelity simulators. For the certification of aircraft under test, aero-database needs to be validated from flight tests throughout the flight envelope and also to certain levels beyond the envelope boundaries. Validation of aero-database close to envelope boundaries entails additional complexities which necessitates careful handling of flight data identification and update process. This paper discusses the approach adopted for aero-database update and flight clearance, followed by a discussion on the issues relevant in the extreme flight test regimes, such as, flow angle accuracy at higher angles-of-attack, center-of-gravity variation with fuel pitch angle for high-g maneuvering conditions and inaccuracies in Mach number at transonic speeds.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2564
Benjamin Riggins, Davide Locatelli, Joseph Schetz, Rakesh Kapania, Thomas Poquet
Abstract 1 Most traditional methods and equations for estimating the structural and nonstructural weights and aerodynamics used at the aircraft conceptual design phase are empirical relations developed for conventional tube-and-wing aircraft. In a computation-heavy design process, such as Multidisciplinary Design and Optimization (MDO) simplicity of calculation is paramount, and for conventional configurations the aforementioned approaches work well enough for conceptual design. But, for non-traditional designs such as strut-braced winged aircraft, empirical data is generally not available and the usual methods can no longer apply. One solution to this is a movement toward generalized physics-based methods that can apply equally well to conventional or non-traditional configurations.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2565
Nhan Nguyen, Sonia Lebofsky, Eric Ting, Upender Kaul, Daniel Chaparro, James Urnes
Abstract This paper summarizes the recent development of an adaptive aeroelastic wing shaping control technology called variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF). As wing flexibility increases, aeroelastic interactions with aerodynamic forces and moments become an increasingly important consideration in aircraft design and aerodynamic performance. Furthermore, aeroelastic interactions with flight dynamics can result in issues with vehicle stability and control. The initial VCCTEF concept was developed in 2010 by NASA under a NASA Innovation Fund study entitled “Elastically Shaped Future Air Vehicle Concept,” which showed that highly flexible wing aerodynamic surfaces can be elastically shaped in-flight by active control of wing twist and bending deflection in order to optimize the spanwise lift distribution for drag reduction.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2562
Tak W. Chan, Wajid Chishty, Craig Davison, David Buote
Abstract This study reports gaseous and particle (ultrafine and black carbon (BC)) emissions from a turbofan engine core on standard Jet A-1 and three alternative fuels, including 100% hydrothermolysis synthetic kerosene with aromatics (CH-SKA), 50% Hydro-processed Esters and Fatty Acid paraffinic kerosene (HEFA-SPK), and 100% Fischer Tropsch (FT-SPK). Gaseous emissions from this engine for various fuels were similar but significant differences in particle emissions were observed. During the idle condition, it was observed that the non-refractory mass fraction in the emitted particles were higher than during higher engine load condition. This observation is consistent for all test fuels. The 100% CH-SKA fuel was found to have noticeable reductions in BC emissions when compared to Jet A-1 by 28-38% by different BC instruments (and 7% in refractory particle number (PN) emissions) at take-off condition.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2563
Alberto Charro, Solange Baena, Joseph K-W Lam
Abstract The paper presents an extensive assessment of the hygroscopic characteristics of a number of alternative jet fuel blends. These are blended with conventional Jet A-1 to conform with current aviation standards at a 50:50 ratio by volume, except for DSHC (Direct Sugar to Hydrocarbon), which is blended at 10% DSHC and 90% Jet A-1. Given the lack of information available on the water solubility of alternative jet fuels, an effective analysis of experimental data about this characteristic in six different alternatives was performed. These included four ASTM approved alternatives (two Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetics from coal and natural gas, one HEFA (Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids) derived from camelina and DSHC. An extra two alternatives currently under consideration for ASTM approval were also tested; ReadiJet and an ATJ (Alcohol to Jet).
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2626
Charla Wise
Abstract The nature of aerospace innovation has changed dramatically in the past few decades, including some subtle changes that might go unnoticed to a casual observer outside our industry. The achievements of the 1950s through the 1990s were often epitomized by events that made headlines throughout the world - for example, breaking the sound barrier, walking on the Moon, receiving the first images from a roving vehicle on Mars, or launching the first airliner designed solely using computers. Aerospace engineers today are creating feats that are no less innovative or impressive but that often lack the universal sensational appeal of those past “miracles.” Now the accomplishments are likely to be concerned with using data more effectively to reduce risk and enhance the safety and affordability of products and services rather than flying faster, higher or more stealthily.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2625
Anthony Cheruet, Robert Schmitz
Abstract In the research of lightweighting solutions, the use of CFRP has dramatically increased during the last two decades to represent today about 50 percent of the materials used in the recent commercial aircrafts. However designers are still facing the challenge to accelerate the insertion of new materials for applications. One of the main challenge concerns the reduction of the material certification time which relies only on experimental procedure. Globally speaking, there is a need for a material definition and certification in a numerical form to meet platform requirement and that allows to reduce cost and development time of new material by replacing manual tests with advanced simulation. A comprehensive simulation process is then proposed and described. This process allows to define a complete test matrix in order to generate B-basis allowable for a given material system. Several aspects have to be considered.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2619
Karl-Otto Strömberg, Stefan Borgenvall, Mohamed Loukil, Bertrand Noharet, Carola Sterner, Magnus Lindblom, Orjan Festin
Abstract Lightweight Production Technology (LWPT) is today a well-established technology in the automotive industry. By introducing light weight fixtures manufactured from Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) in aeronautical applications, new challenges as well as possibilities of in-situ health monitoring emerges. The present paper present results from experimental investigations using optical fibers with multiplex Bragg gratings (FBG) as strain gauges in an industrial CFRP fixture. Fixtures were manufactured of laminates made from CFRP. Measurements have been performed on a single CFRP beam with dimensions (8000 × 500 × 500 mm), used as a structural part in a larger assembly (9000 × 4000mm). The optical fibers were placed in between two laminates on two sides of the beam. The measurement data from the FBGs were compared and correlated to the measured displacements of the beam and the applied loads.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2618
Bernd-Michael Wolf, Christian Meiners
Abstract SCALE is a modular, non-contact, in-line measurement system. It measures the diameter of the countersink directly after the drilling, the amount and distribution of sealant in the open hole, and the head height of the fastener as well as pressed out sealant (cf. Figure 1). The system is fast and reliable and the out coming information is reliable and trustworthy. Until now the system could not measure the inner diameter of the hole. The reason for this is that it is not possible to detect the inner diameter with a camera that looks only at the top of the component. But as our customers make the request to us, we decided to develop an optical hole probe system which is fully integrated in the auto fastening process. We think that a mechanical system cannot fulfill the customer expectations in terms of reliability, low maintenance, precision and speed. Only a non-contact system can measure permanently safe and fast the inner diameter of holes.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2621
Douglas Leicht
Abstract Aviation regulations requires that engine mounts, and other flight structures located in designated fire zones must be constructed of fireproof material so that they are capable of withstanding the effects of fire. Historically, steel is defined as being inherently fireproof, however, titanium was not. Therefore, a fireproof test was conducted using 6AL-4V titanium structure for the attachment of the propulsion system on a mid-size business jet to satisfy FAA Federal Aviation Requirement 25.865. To determine if the titanium structure would be able to support normal operating loads during the fire event, finite element analysis was performed on the titanium structure simulating the fire test. The fire test simulates a fire on the aircraft from the propulsion system by using a burner with jet fuel exposing the component to a 2000 °F (1093°C) flame. The 2000 °F (1093°C) Flame is calibrated based on FAA Advisory Circular AC20-135.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2620
Philip Van Baren
Abstract Random vibration control systems produce a PSD plot by averaging FFTs. Modern controllers can set the degrees of freedom (DOF), which is a measure of the amount of averaging to use to estimate the PSD. The PSD is a way to present a random signal-which by nature “bounces” about the mean, at times making high excursions from the mean-in a format that makes it easy to determine the validity of a test. This process takes time as many frames of data are collected in order to generate the PSD estimate and a test can appear to be out of tolerance until the controller has enough data to estimate the PSD with a sufficient level of confidence. Something is awry with a PSD estimate that achieves total in-tolerance immediately after the test begins or immediately after a change in level, and this can hide dangerous over or under test conditions within specific frequency bands, and should be avoided.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2614
Hideki Okada, Kenichi Kamimuki, Syuhei Yoshikawa, Shintaro Fukada
In the modern aircraft manufacturing, the cost reduction, the manufacturing time reduction, and the weight saving of aircraft are strongly demanded. The Refill Friction Spot Joining [1,2](FSJ, in other words FSSW, Friction Stir Spot Welding), which is one of innovative solid-state joining methodologies based on the Friction Stir Welding[3], is a promising technology that can replace rivets and fasteners. This technology is expected to offer cost reduction and weight saving for the aircraft manufacturing. In this study, to make stronger and reliable joints, the shoulder-plunging process of Refill FSJ was employed. The weldability of the Alodine or Chromic Acid Anodize coated materials along with a faying-surface sealant was investigated. The joint properties, such as tensile shear strengths and corrosion resistance, were evaluated.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2615
Donald Jasurda
The aerospace industry is continually becoming more competitive. With an aircraft's large number of components, and the large supplier base used to fabricate these components, it can be a daunting task to manage the quality status of all parts in an accurate, timely and actionable manner. This paper focuses on a proof of concept for an aircraft fuselage assembly to monitor the process capability of machined parts at an aircraft original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and their supply chain. Through the use of standardized measurement plans and statistical analysis of the measured output, the paper will illustrate how stakeholders can understand the process performance details at a workcell level, as well as overall line and plant performance in real time. This ideal process begins in the product engineering phase using simulation to analyze the tolerance specifications and assembly process strategy, with one of the outputs being a production measurement plan.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2616
Richard Lindqvist, Tobias Jansson
Abstract The scope and purpose of this paper is to give input and propose solutions to the creation of an efficient and productive geometrical measurement planning process. The case study outline what is important and how to identify and determine the preconditions and input data which is required to start the preparation and planning activities of geometrical measurements. That is why the following three main research and development questions should be answered: Firstly; What is the need and why does an efficient and productive geometrical measurement planning process contribute to decrease cost upstream as well as downstream in terms of reduced lead times in measurement planning process work? Secondly; Why are reduced uncertainties related to geometrical; functionality, specification and verification, important? And how are they linked to each other and how can they be theoretically modeled and defined in terms of uncertainties?
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2617
Raimund Loser, Michael Kleinkes
Abstract Industrial robots are well introduced into automated production processes. Their mechanical design is dominated by some major key factors like required flexibility, different payload demands, working range, working speed, combination with different working tools and robot costs. The final achieved position accuracy of the robot tool centre point (TCP) is based on the combination of these key factors. In general, the smallest movement steps and the repeatability of robots are much lower than the absolute achievable accuracy. The positioning results and especially the programmed paths of the TCP show relatively large differences between the programmed nominal paths related to the final achieved movements in reality. These differences can be detected using the Absolute Tracker with its very high dynamic performance, especially if the 6DoF capability is included.
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