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Viewing 1 to 30 of 1404
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0935
Leonid Tartakovsky, Ran Amiel, Vladimir Baibikov, Mark Veinblat
Abstract This study considers one of the challenges that arise during conversion of gasoline SI engines to ‘heavy fuel’ feeding - worsening engine performance because of intensive fuel film formation on inner surfaces of the intake manifold. A main goal of this study was investigation of an interaction process of a single fuel drop and a fuel jet with the impingement surface. Ultrasonic (US) oscillation of the latter was applied to prevent fuel film formation. Diesel fuel was chosen for our experiments because it causes more problems of mixture formation in SI engines. In the series of experiments with a single drop, effects of the drop size, ultrasound performance and a type of the impingement surface on the drop behavior were studied using a high-speed photography. In experiments with a fuel jet the phenomena of fuel film formation and size distribution of the impinging and reflected droplets were studied using a high-speed photography and PDPA/LDV technique.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0936
Andrew Swantek, Alan Kastengren, Daniel Duke, Zak Tilocco, Nicolas Sovis, Christopher F. Powell
Abstract Recent advancements in x-ray radiography diagnostics for direct injection sprays at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source have allowed absorption measurements of individual spray events, in addition to ensemble-averaged measurements. These measurements offer insight into the shot-to-shot variation of these sprays in the near-nozzle, spray formation region. Three single hole diesel injectors are studied across various injection and ambient pressures, spanning 14 different conditions. We calculated two dimensional maps of the standard deviation in line of sight mass distribution between individual spray events. These illuminated the spatial and temporal extent of variability between spray events. Regions of large fluctuations were observed to move downstream during the initial spray period and reached a steady state location after this initial transient.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0938
Prashanth Karra, Thomas Rogers, Petros Lappas
Abstract The air entrainment process of a compressed natural gas transient fuel jet was investigated in a constant-volume chamber using Schlieren and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. A new method of calculating air entrainment around a gaseous fuel jet is proposed using Schlieren and PIV imaging techniques. This method offers an alternative to calculation of an alternative to calculation of entrainment using LIF technique in gaseous fuel jets. Several Jet-ambient pressure ratios were tested. In each test, nitrogen was used to fill the chamber as an air surrogate before the jet of natural gas was injected. Schlieren high speed videography and PIV experiments were performed at the same conditions. Schlieren mask images were used to accurately identify the jet boundary which was then superimposed onto a PIV image. Vectors adjacent to the Schlieren mask in the PIV image were used to calculate the spatial distribution of the air entrainment at the jet boundary.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0937
Philip Zoldak, Joel John Joseph, William Shelley, Jaclyn Johnson, Jeffrey Naber
Abstract The increased availability of natural gas (NG) in the United States (US) and its relatively low cost compared to diesel fuel has heightened interest in the conversion of medium duty (MD) and heavy duty (HD) diesel engines to NG fuel and combustion systems (compressed or liquefied). The intention is to realize fuel cost savings and reduce harmful emissions, while maintaining or improving overall vehicle fuel economy. This is a potential path to help the US achieve energy diversity and reduce dependence on crude oil. Traditionally, port-injected, premixed NG spark-ignited combustion systems have been used for medium and heavy duty engines with widespread use in the US and Europe. But this technology exhibits poor cycle efficiency and is load limited due to knock phenomenon. Direct Injection of NG during the compression stroke promises to deliver improved thermal efficiency by avoiding premixing and extending the lean limits which helps to extend the knock limit.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0939
Daliang Jing, Shi-Jin Shuai, Zhi Wang, Yanfei Li, Hongming Xu
Abstract The design and optimization of a modern spray-guided gasoline direct injection engine require a thorough understanding of the fuel spray characteristics and atomization process. The fuel spray Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling technology can be an effective means to study and predict spray characteristics, and as a consequence, to drastically reduce experimental work during the engine development process. For this reason, an accurate numerical simulation of the spray evolution process is imperative. Different models based on aerodynamically-induced breakup mechanism have been implemented to simulate spray atomization process in earlier studies, and the effect of turbulence from the injector nozzle is recently being concerned increasingly by engine researchers. In this study, a turbulence-induced primary breakup model coupled with aerodynamic instability is developed.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0940
Yun Bai, Liyun Fan, Xiuzhen Ma, Enzhe Song, Xin Yan
Abstract Electronic in-line pump system (EIPS) is an electronic controlled fuel injection system which meets China's emission regulations. In this paper, a numerical model of EIPS was developed in AMESim for the purpose of creating a tool for simulation experiments. Experiments were conducted at the same model conditions to validate the model. The results are quite encouraging and in agreement with model predictions which imply that the model can accurately predict the dynamic injection characteristics of EIPS. The design of experiments was performed using a 2-level-5-factor face-centered central composite design (FCCD) method in order to study the interactive effect of factors on fuel injection quantity fluctuation (FIQF). The factors studied were supply fuel pressure, cam linear velocity, control valve lift, needle spring pretightening force and nozzle flow coefficient.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0941
Gina M. Magnotti, Caroline L. Genzale
Abstract Spray processes, such as primary breakup, play an important role for subsequent combustion processes and emissions formation. Accurate modeling of these spray physics is therefore key to ensure faithful representation of both the global and local characteristics of the spray. However, the governing physical mechanisms underlying primary breakup in fuel sprays are still not known. Several theories have been proposed and incorporated into different engineering models for the primary breakup of fuel sprays, with the most widely employed models following an approach based on aerodynamically-induced breakup, or more recently, based on liquid turbulence-induced breakup. However, a complete validation of these breakup models and theories is lacking since no existing measurements have yielded the joint liquid mass and drop size distribution needed to fully define the spray, especially in the near-nozzle region.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0942
Vikram Singh, Anshul Koli
Abstract This research presents the simulation of the jet behavior of gasoline ethanol blends in a quiescent chamber using the Lattice Boltzmann method. The fuel is taken as different mixtures of gasoline and ethanol, and the properties, such as density, viscosity and surface tension, are varied accordingly in the Lattice Boltzmann model. The variations in jet structure and instabilities are modeled according to the velocity of fuel injection, the composition of the gasoline-ethanol blend and the property of the surrounding mixture. The model implemented for the interaction of the two fluids; air and fuel, is the Shan Chen model. The accuracy of the model is confirmed using a static drop test at different curvatures for the two fluids as well as observing the evolution of merging droplets. This is the first time that the study of different fuels in done using the Shan Chen model.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0943
Bizhan Befrui, Mario D'Onofrio, Lee E. Markle, Peter Spiekermann
Abstract This paper presents results of a coupling of the Volume-of-Fluid Large-Eddy simulation (VOF-LES) of the jet primary breakup with a Lagrangian stochastic spray simulation of a GDi multi-hole injector. The objective is to assess the potential of replacing the phenomenological models of jet primary atomization with the stochastic parcel size - velocity data extracted from the VOF-LES analysis. The paper describes the methodology and assesses the predictive capability achieved, through comparison of the Lagrangian far-field spray simulation results with the complete experimental spray characterization data under the atmospheric ambient conditions. The injector sac-nozzle flow and jet primary breakup simulation is performed with the Open-FOAM code. The simulation of the spray development processes - of propagation, evaporation and secondary atomization - is performed with the AVL-FIRE commercial CFD code adopting the standard Lagrangian discrete droplet method.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0944
Maryam Moulai, Ronald Grover, Scott Parrish, David Schmidt
Abstract A computational and experimental study was performed to characterize the flow within a gasoline injector and the ensuing sprays. The computations included the effects of turbulence, cavitation, flash-boiling, compressibility, and the presence of non-condensible gases. The flow domain corresponded to the Engine Combustion Network's Spray G, an eight-hole counterbore injector operating in a variety of conditions. First, a rate tube method was used to measure the rate of injection, which was then used to define inlet boundary conditions for simulation. Correspondingly, injection under submerged conditions was simulated for direct comparison with experimental measurements of discharge coefficient. Next, the internal flow and external spray into pressurized nitrogen were simulated under the base spray G conditions. Finally, injection under flashing conditions was simulated, where the ambient pressure was below the vapor pressure of the fuel.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0946
Yongjin Jung, Julien Manin, Scott Skeen, Lyle M Pickett
Abstract The mixing field of sprays injected into high temperature and pressure environments has been observed to be tightly connected to spreading angle, therefore linking vaporization and combustion processes to the angular dispersion of the spray. Visualization of the Engine Combustion Network three-hole, Spray B diesel injector shows substantial variation in near-field spreading angle with respect to time compared to past measurements of the single-hole, Spray A injector. The source of these variations originating inside the nozzle, and the implications on mixing, evaporation, and combustion of the diesel plume, need to be understood. In this study, we characterize the ECN-target plume for a Spray B injector (Serial # 211201), which already benefits from extensive and detailed internal measurements of nozzle geometry and needle movement, while comparing to the single-hole Spray A with the same type of detailed geometry and understanding.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0948
Le (Emma) Zhao, Ahmed Abdul Moiz, Jeffrey Naber, Seong-Young Lee, Sam Barros, William Atkinson
Abstract High-speed spray-to-spray liquid impingement could be an effective phenomenon for the spray propagation and droplet vaporization. To achieve higher vaporization efficiency, impingement from two-hole nozzles is analyzed in this paper. This paper focuses on investigating vaporization mechanism as a function of the impingement location and the collision breakup process provided by two-hole impinging jet nozzles. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) is adopted to do simulation. Lagrangian model is used to predict jet-to-jet impingement and droplet breakup conditions while KH-RT breakup and O'Rourke collision models are implemented for the simulation. The paper includes three parts: First, a single spray injected into an initially quiescent constant volume chamber using the Lagrangian approach is simulated to identify the breakup region, which will be considered as a reference to study two-hole impinging jet nozzles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0950
Jonas Galle, Roel Verschaeren, Sebastian Verhelst
Abstract The need for simulation tools for the internal combustion engine is becoming more and more important due to the complex engine design and increasingly strict emission regulation. One needs accurate and fast models, but fuels consist of a complex mixture of different molecules which cannot realistically be handled in computations. Simplifications are required and are realized using fuel surrogates. The main goal of this work is to show that the choice of the surrogates is of importance if simplified models are used and that the performance strongly depends upon the sensitivity of the fuel properties that refer to the main model hypotheses. This paper starts with an overview of surrogates for diesel and bio-diesel as well as the motivation for choosing them. Next, a phenomenological model for vaporizing fuel-sprays is implemented to assess how well-known surrogates for diesel and bio-diesel affect the obtained results.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0949
Mathis Bode, Tobias Falkenstein, Vincent Le Chenadec, Seongwon Kang, Heinz Pitsch, Toshiyuki Arima, Hiroyoshi Taniguchi
Abstract Compared to conventional injection techniques, Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) has a lot of advantages such as increased fuel efficiency, high power output and low emission levels, which can be more accurately controlled. Therefore, this technique is an important topic of today's injection system research. Although the operating conditions of GDI injectors are simpler from a numerical point of view because of smaller Reynolds and Weber numbers compared to Diesel injection systems, accurate simulations of the breakup in the vicinity of the nozzle are very challenging. Combined with the complications of experimental techniques that could be applied inside the nozzle and at the nozzle exit, this is the reason for the lack of understanding the primary breakup behavior of current GDI injectors.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0952
Michael A. Groendyk, David Rothamer
Abstract The effect of fuel physical properties on the ignition and combustion characteristics of diesel fuels was investigated in a heavy-duty 2.52 L single-cylinder engine. Two binary component fuels, one comprised of farnesane (FAR) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), and another comprised of primary reference fuels (PRF) for the octane rating scale (i.e. n-heptane and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane), were blended to match the cetane number (CN) of a 45 CN diesel fuel. The binary mixtures were used neat, and blended at 25, 50, and 75% by volume with the baseline diesel. Ignition delay (ID) for each blend was measured under identical operating conditions. A single injection was used, with injection timing varied from −12.5 to 2.5 CAD. Injection pressures of 50, 100, and 150 MPa were tested. Observed IDs were consistent with previous work done under similar conditions with diesel fuels. The shortest IDs were seen at injection timings of −7.5 CAD.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0951
JM Desantes, FJ Salvador, M Carreres, D Jaramillo
Abstract The influence of pressure and temperature on some of the important thermodynamic properties of diesel fuels has been assessed for a set of fuels. The study focuses on the experimental determination of the speed of sound, density and compressibility (via the bulk modulus) of these fuels by means of a method that is thoroughly described in this paper. The setup makes use of a common-rail injection system in order to transmit a pressure wave through a high-pressure line and measure the time it takes for the wave to travel a given distance. Measurements have been performed in a wide range of pressures (from atmospheric pressure up to 200 MPa) and temperatures (from 303 to 353 K), in order to generate a fuel properties database for modelers on the field of injection systems for diesel engines to incorporate to their simulations.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0955
Hejun Guo, Qining Xun, Shenghua Liu, Xuanjun Wang
Abstract In the present paper, a new biofuel ethylene glycol monomethyl ether soyate has been developed. The biofuel was synthesized with a refined soybean oil and ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as reactants and sodium as catalyst under 90°C. The synthesized crude product was purified and structurally identified through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum (FT-IR), 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H NMR) and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) analyses. The physicochemical properties of the biofuel and its addition effects on properties of diesel fuel were measured according to China national standard test methods. A single cylinder diesel engine was employed to evaluate the influences of the biofuel on engine fuel economy and engine-out emissions of CO, HC, NOx and smoke.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0954
Mario Martins, Thompson Lanzanova, Rafael Sari
Abstract This study evaluates the performance of an ethanol fueled spark ignited engine running with high levels of hydration. Ethanol is a renewable fuel and has been considered a promising alternative to counteract global warming and to reduce pollutant emissions. Its use is well established in ICE as the main fuel or blended with gasoline. However, due to its lower calorific value, it shows increased fuel consumption when compared to gasoline, rendering its use sometimes less attractive. The energy demand to produce ethanol, especially at the distillation phase, increases exponentially as the concentration of ethanol-in-water goes from 80% onwards. Thus, mixtures with less than 80% of ethanol-in-water would reduce the energy consumption during production, yielding a less expensive fuel. In previous studies, to evaluate the feasibility of wet ethanol as a fuel for spark-ignited engines, results have shown that it was possible to use mixtures of up to 40% of water-in-ethanol.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0958
Naveen Kumar, Sidharth Bansal, Harveer Singh Pali
Abstract Concerns about long term availability of petroleum based fuels and stringent environmental norms have been a subject for deliberations around the globe. The vegetable oil based fuels and alcohols are very promising alternative fuels for substitution of diesel, reduce exhaust emissions and to improve combustion in diesel engines which is mainly possible due to oxygenated nature of these fuels. Jatropha oil is important non-edible oil in India which is either used in neat or modified form as diesel fuel. Furthermore n-butanol is renewable higher alcohol having properties quite similar to diesel fuel. In the present study, n-butanol was blended in Jatropha Oil (JO) and Jatropha Oil Methyl Ester (JME) on volumetric basis (10 and 20%). The blends were homogeneous and stable and there was no phase separation. The different physicochemical properties of blends were evaluated as per relevant standards.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0957
George Karavalakis, Daniel Short, Diep Vu, Robert Russell, Akua Asa-Awuku, Thomas Durbin
Abstract Biofuels, such as ethanol and butanol, have been the subject of significant political and scientific attention, owing to concerns about climate change, global energy security, and the decline of world oil resources that is aggravated by the continuous increase in the demand for fossil fuels. This study evaluated the potential emissions impacts of different alcohol blends on a fleet of modern gasoline vehicles. Testing was conducted on a fleet of nine vehicles with different combinations of ten fuel blends over the Federal Test Procedure and Unified Cycle. The vehicles ranged in model year from 2007-2014 and included four vehicles with port fuel injection (PFI) fueling and five vehicles with direct injection (DI) fueling.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0963
Miao Tian, Robin Van Haaren, Jos Reijnders, Michael Boot
Abstract Owing to environmental and health concerns, tetraethyl lead was gradually phased out from the early 1970's to mid-1990's in most developed countries. Advances in refining, leading to more aromatics (via reformate) and iso-paraffins such as iso-octane, along with the introduction of (bio) oxygenates such as MTBE, ETBE and ethanol, facilitated the removal of lead without sacrificing RON and MON. In recent years, however, legislation has been moving in the direction of curbing aromatic and olefin content in gasoline, owing to similar concerns as was the case for lead. Meanwhile, concerns over global warming and energy security have motivated research into renewable fuels. Amongst which are those derived from biomass. The feedstock of interest in this study is lignin, which, together with hemicellulose and cellulose, is amongst the most abundant organic compounds on the planet.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0960
Thomas Huelser, Daniel Klein, Benedikt Heuser, Thorsten Brands, Christian Schulz, Gerd Grunefeld, Stefan Pischinger
Abstract With increasing interest in new biofuel candidates, 1-octanol and di-n-butylether (DNBE) were presented in recent studies. Although these molecular species are isomers, their properties are substantially different. In contrast to DNBE, 1-octanol is almost a gasoline-type fuel in terms of its auto-ignition quality. Thus, there are problems associated with engine start-up for neat 1-octanol. In order to find a suitable glow-plug position, mixture formation is studied in the cylinder under almost idle operating conditions in the present work. This is conducted by planar laser-induced fluorescence in a high-speed direct-injection optical diesel engine. The investigated C8-oxygenates are also significantly different in terms of their evaporation characteristics. Thus, in-cylinder mixture formation of these two species is compared in this work, allowing conclusions on combustion behavior and exhaust emissions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0966
Sauhard Singh, Anil Bhardwaj, Reji Mathai, A K Sehgal, R Suresh, B P Das, Nishant Tyagi, Jaywant Mohite, N B Chougule
Abstract The ever increasing demand of fuels for vehicles can only be met by use of alternate fuels like Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Hydrogen (H2). The 18 percent hydrogen enriched CNG fuel referred to as HCNG has the potential to lower emissions and is considered to be the first step towards promotion of a Hydrogen economy. While, automotive industry matures up with the usage of new engines, lubricant manufacturers are also moving on to the next stage by formulating oils to be used in gas engines such as CNG, HCNG etc. This paper presents the evaluation of gas engine oil on 6-cylinder heavy duty CNG engine using HCNG. The six cylinder engine was chosen due to its importance for urban bus transportation. The engine was optimized for using HCNG fuel. Initial performance of the engine using HCNG was compared vis-à-vis CNG and, thereafter, the engine was subjected to endurance test of 500 hours as per 8 mode engine simulated driving cycle.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0965
James M. Sevik, Thomas Wallner, Scott Miers, Jeff Wasil
Abstract In 1990, Roy Douglas developed an analytical method to calculate the global air-to-fuel ratio of a two-stroke engine from exhaust gas emissions. While this method has considerable application to two-stroke engines, it does not permit the calculation of air-to-fuel ratios for oxygenated fuels. This study proposed modifications to the Roy Douglas method such that it can be applied to oxygenated fuels. The ISO #16183 standard, the modified Spindt method, and the Brettschneider method were used to evaluate the modifications to the Roy Douglas method. In addition, a trapped air-to-fuel ratio, appropriate for two-stroke engines, was also modified to incorporate oxygenated fuels. To validate the modified calculation method, tests were performed using a two-stroke carbureted and two-stroke direct injected marine outboard engine over a five-mode marine test cycle running indolene and low level blends of ethanol and iso-butanol fuels.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0972
Alexander Pawlowski, Derek Splitter
Abstract It is well known that spark ignited engine performance and efficiency is closely coupled to fuel octane number. The present work combines historical and recent trends in spark ignition engines to build a database of engine design, performance, and fuel octane requirements over the past 80 years. The database consists of engine compression ratio, required fuel octane number, peak mean effective pressure, specific output, and combined unadjusted fuel economy for passenger vehicles and light trucks. Recent trends in engine performance, efficiency, and fuel octane number requirement were used to develop correlations of fuel octane number utilization, performance, specific output. The results show that historically, engine compression ratio and specific output have been strongly coupled to fuel octane number.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0967
Tingjun Hu, Ho Teng, Xuwei Luo, Bin Chen
Abstract Turbocharged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engines often have a flat torque curve with the maximum torque covering a wide range of engine speeds. Increasing the high-speed-end torque for a TGDI engine provides better acceleration performance to the vehicle powered by the engine. However, it also requires more fuel deliveries and thus longer injection durations at high engine speeds, for which the multiple fuel injections per cycle may not be possible. In this study, results are reported of an experimental investigation of impact of fuel injection on dilution of the crankcase oil for a highly-boosted TGDI engine. It was found in the tests that the high-speed-end torque for the TGDI engine had a significant influence on fuel dilution: longer injection durations resulted in impingement of large liquid fuel drops on the piston top, leading to a considerable level of fuel dilution.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0974
Aaron Brooker, Jeffrey Gonder, Sean Lopp, Jacob Ward
Abstract The Automotive Deployment Options Projection Tool (ADOPT) is a light-duty vehicle consumer choice and stock model supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office. It estimates technology improvement impacts on future U.S. light-duty vehicles sales, petroleum use, and greenhouse gas emissions. ADOPT uses techniques from the multinomial logit method and the mixed logit method to estimate vehicle sales. Specifically, it estimate sales based on the weighted value of key attributes including vehicle price, fuel cost, acceleration, range and usable volume. The average importance of several attributes changes nonlinearly across its range and changes with income. For several attributes, a distribution of importance around the average value is used to represent consumer heterogeneity. The majority of existing vehicle makes, models, and trims are included to fully represent the market. The Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations are enforced.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0973
Aaron Brooker, Jeffrey Gonder, Lijuan Wang, Eric Wood, Sean Lopp, Laurie Ramroth
Abstract The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is a high-level advanced vehicle powertrain systems analysis tool supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office. FASTSim provides a quick and simple approach to compare powertrains and estimate the impact of technology improvements on light- and heavy-duty vehicle efficiency, performance, cost, and battery life. The input data for most light-duty vehicles can be automatically imported. Those inputs can be modified to represent variations of the vehicle or powertrain. The vehicle and its components are then simulated through speed-versus-time drive cycles. At each time step, FASTSim accounts for drag, acceleration, ascent, rolling resistance, each powertrain component's efficiency and power limits, and regenerative braking.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0979
Chih Feng Lee, Per Öberg
Abstract This paper investigates classifications of road type and driving style based on on-board diagnostic data, which is commonly accessible in modern vehicles. The outcomes of these classifications can be utilized in, for example, supporting the advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) for enhancing safety and drivability, and online adaptation of engine controller for improving performance and fuel consumption. Furthermore, the classifications offer valuable information for fleet operators to consider when making decision on procurement plans, maintenance schedules and assisting fleet drivers in choosing suitable vehicles. To this end, a velocity-based road type classification method is evaluated on measurements collected from real driving conditions and compared to an open-sourced map.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0981
Patrick Phlips
Abstract A normalized analytical vehicle fuel consumption model is developed based on an input/output description of engine fuel consumption and transmission losses. Engine properties and fuel consumption are expressed in mean effective pressure (mep) units, while vehicle road load, acceleration and grade are expressed in acceleration units. The engine model concentrates on the low rpm operation. The fuel mep is approximately independent of speed and is a linear function of load, as long as the engine is not knock limited. A linear, two-constant engine model then covers the speed/load range of interest. The model constants are a function of well-known engine properties. Examples are discussed for naturally aspirated and turbocharged SI engines and for Diesel engines. A similar model is developed for the transmission where the offset reflects the spin and pump losses, and the slope is the gear efficiency.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 1404

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