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Viewing 1 to 30 of 69
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2059
Rolf Loewenherz, Virgilio Valdivia-Guerrero, Daniel Diaz Lopez, Joshua Parkin
Abstract Auto transformer rectifier units (ATRUs) are commonly used in aircraft applications such as electric actuation for harmonic mitigation due to their high reliability and relative low cost. However, those components and the magnetic filter components associated to it are the major contributors to the overall size and weight of the system. Optimization of the magnetic components is essential in order to minimize weight and size, which are major market drivers in aerospace industry today. This requires knowledge of the harmonic content of the current. This can be obtained by simulation, but the process is slow. In order to enable fast and efficient design space exploration of optimal solutions, an algebraic calculation process is proposed in this paper for multi-pulse ATRUs (e.g. 12-pulse and 18-pulse rectifiers), starting from existing solution proposed for 6 pulse rectifier in the literature.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2063
Beata I. Wawrzyniak, Jagadeesh Tangudu
Abstract Induction machines (IM) are considered work horse for industrial applications due to their rugged, reliable and inexpensive nature; however, their low power density restricts their use in volume and weight limited environments such as an aerospace, traction and propulsion applications. Given recent advancements in additive manufacturing technologies, this paper presents opportunity to improve power density of induction machines by taking advantage of higher slot fill factor (SFF) (defined as ratio of bare copper area to slot area) is explored. Increase in SFF is achieved by deposition of copper in much more compact way than conventional manufacturing methods of winding in electrical machines. Thus a design tradeoff study for an induction motor with improved SFF is essential to identify and highlight the potentials of IM for high power density applications and is elaborated in this paper.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2067
Qingchuan Shi, Kartik Lakshminarashimhan, Christopher Noll, Eelco Scholte, Omer Khan
Abstract Modern aircraft systems employ numerous processors to achieve system functionality. In particular, engine controls and power distribution subsystems rely heavily on software to provide safety-critical functionality, and are expected to move towards multicore architectures. The computing hardware-layer of avionic systems must be able to execute many concurrent workloads under tight deterministic execution guarantees to meet the safety standards. Single-chip multicores are attractive for safety-critical embedded systems due to their lightweight form factor. However, multicores aggressively share hardware resources, leading to interference that in turn creates non-deterministic execution for multiple concurrent workloads. We propose an approach to remove on-chip interference via a set of methods to spatio-temporally partition shared multicore resources.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2069
Zied Aloui, Nawfal Ahamada, Julien Denoulet, Martin Rayrole, Francine Pierre, Marc Gatti
Abstract Avionics is one kind of domain where prevention prevails. Nonetheless failures occur, sometimes due to pilot misreacting, flooded in information. Sometimes information itself would be better verified than trusted. To avoid some kind of failure, it has been thought to add,in midst of the ARINC664 aircraft data network, a new kind of monitoring.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2042
Chad N. Miller, Michael Boyd
Abstract This paper introduces a method for conducting experimental hardware-in-the-loop (xHIL), in which behavioral-level models are coupled with an advanced power emulator (APE) to emulate an electrical load on a power generation system. The emulator is commanded by behavioral-level models running on an advanced real-time simulator that has the capability to leverage Central Processing Units (CPUs) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) to meet strict real-time execution requirements. The paper will be broken down into four topics: 1) the development of a solution to target behavioral-level models to an advanced, real-time simulation device, 2) the development of a high-bandwidth, high-power emulation capability, 3) the integration of the real-time simulation device and the APE, and 4) the application of the emulation system (simulator and emulator) in an xHIL experiment.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2044
Jeffrey J. Joyce, Scott Beecher, Laurent Fabre, Ramesh Rajagopalan
Abstract Over the past few decades, advanced methods have been developed for the analysis of digital systems using mathematical reasoning, i.e., formal logic. These methods are supported by sophisticated software tools that can be used to perform analysis far beyond what is practically achievable using “paper and pencil” analysis. In December 2011, RTCA published RTCA DO-178C [1] along with a set of technical supplements including RTCA DO-333 [2] which provides guidance on the use of formal methods towards the certification of airborne software. Such methods have the potential to reduce the cost of verification by using formal analysis instead of conventional test-based methods to produce a portion of the verification evidence required for certification.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2046
Neno Novakovic
Abstract A Landing Gear Control and Actuation System (LGCAS) is one of the most complex aircraft systems. Due to the large landing gear masses and high performance requirements, aircraft hydraulic power with multiple hydraulic actuators and valves is used to provide system dynamic. LGCAS also requires a electrical source of energy for the electro-mechanical components, sensors and electronic control unit. For many years, correct fault isolation in a complex kinematic system, such as an aircraft landing gear actuation system, has been a great challenge with limited success. The fault isolation design challenge rests on the fact that landing gear control and actuation system has many so called “passive” components, whose basic function cannot be continuously monitored without additional sensors, transducers, and designated health monitoring equipment.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2050
Martin Espinosa Sanchez, Mario Pérez Millás
Abstract The effect of air pockets in capillaries in terms of pressure variations is investigated experimentally. Pressure sensors in aircraft are often installed separate to the pipes and connected with capillaries to minimise ignition sources within fuel tanks. Trapped air within these capillaries might distort the measurement. These effects are characterised in this paper. Extensive tests with different capillary configurations, trapped air volumes and pressure transients are studied. The data obtained shows that the main effect of trapped air during pressure transients is a delay in the pressure response against its excitation, causing local pressure oscillations around its source value until the pressure is equal in both places again. These oscillations can turn into high pressure peaks under critical conditions. Greater amounts of air can cause greater delays and viceversa.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2052
Virgilio Valdivia-Guerrero, Ray Foley, Stefano Riverso, Parithi Govindaraju, Atiyah Elsheikh, Leonardo Mangeruca, Gilberto Burgio, Alberto Ferrari, Marcel Gottschall, Torsten Blochwitz, Serge Bloch, Danielle Taylor, Declan Hayes-McCoy, Andreas Himmler
Abstract This paper presents an overview of a project called “Modelling and Simulation Tools for Systems Integration on Aircraft (MISSION)”. This is a collaborative project being developed under the European Union Clean Sky 2 Program, a public-private partnership bringing together aeronautics industrial leaders and public research organizations based in Europe. The provision of integrated modeling, simulation, and optimization tools to effectively support all stages of aircraft design remains a critical challenge in the Aerospace industry. In particular the high level of system integration that is characteristic of new aircraft designs is dramatically increasing the complexity of both design and verification. Simultaneously, the multi-physics interactions between structural, electrical, thermal, and hydraulic components have become more significant as the systems become increasingly interconnected.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2054
Deniz Unlu, Federico Cappuzzo, Olivier Broca, Pierpaolo Borrelli
Abstract This paper presents the activities foreseen on the Leonardo Aircraft Division EIS (Entry In Service) 2020 derivative aircraft performed in the frame of the FP7 European research project TOICA (Thermal Overall Integrated Concept of Aircraft). On board air systems for conventional aircraft are fed by the bleed off-take which penalizes the amount of power available to the turbine of jet or turboprop engines. In order to minimize such operating penalties and optimize the energy efficiency of the overall aircraft, it is of major interest to support trade-offs at aircraft level including aircraft systems as early as possible in the development cycle. The study presents the Virtual Integrated Aircraft methodology and associated simulation activities relying on the system simulation platform LMS Imagine.Lab. This methodology is also relying on concept of flexible model and pyramid of models developed in the context of TOICA.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2027
Brett Robbins, Kevin J. Yost, Jon Zumberge
Abstract Detailed machine models are, and will continue to be, a critical component of both the design and validation processes for engineering future aircraft, which will undoubtedly continue to push the boundaries for the demand of electric power. This paper presents a survey of experimental testing procedures for typical synchronous machines that are applied to brushless synchronous machines with rotating rectifiers to characterize their operational impedances. The relevance and limitations of these procedures are discussed, which include steady-state drive stand tests, sudden short-circuit transient (SSC) tests, and standstill frequency response (SSFR) tests. Then, results captured in laboratory of the aforementioned tests are presented.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2029
Rolf Loewenherz, Francisco Gonzalez-Espin, Laura Albiol-Tendillo, Virgilio Valdivia-Guerrero, Ray Foley
Abstract This paper will present a multi-domain (electrical and thermal) model of a three phase voltage source converter and its implementation in Modelica language. An averaged model is utilised for the electrical domain, and a power balance method is used for linking the DC and AC sides. The thermal domain focuses in deriving the converter losses by deriving the analytical equations of the space vector modulation to derive a function for the duty cycle of each converter leg. With this, the conduction and switching losses are calculated for the individual switches and diodes, without having to model their actual switching behaviour. The model is very fast to simulate, as no switching events are needed, and allows obtaining the simulation of the electrical and thermal behaviour in the same simulation package..
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2031
Michal Sztykiel, Steven Fletcher, Patrick Norman, Stuart Galloway, Graeme Burt
Abstract There is a well-recognised need for robust simulation tools to support the design and evaluation of future More-Electric Engine and Aircraft (MEE/MEA) design concepts. Design options for these systems are increasingly complex, and normally include multiple power electronics converter topologies and machine drive units. In order to identify the most promising set of system configurations, a large number of technology variants need to be rapidly evaluated. This paper will describe a method of MEE/MEA system design with the use of a newly developed transient modeling, simulation and testing tool aimed at accelerating the identification process of optimal components, testing novel technologies and finding key solutions at an early development stage. The developed tool is a Matlab/Simulink library consisting of functional sub-system units, which can be rapidly integrated to build complex system architecture models.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2033
Rudolf Neydorf, Ivan Chernogorov, Victor Polyakh, Orkhan Yarakhmedov, Julia Goncharova, Anna Neydorf
Abstract Mathematical modeling of technical objects is most frequently connected with mathematical processing of experimental data. The obtained pointlike dependencies of output variables on input ones are often strongly nonlinear, piecewise, and sometimes discontinuous. Approximation of these dependencies using polynomial resolution and spline-functions is problematic and may cause low accuracy. A radically new solution to this problem was suggested in a number of previous works. The method is based on partitioning of experimental dependencies into patches, approximation of each patch by analytic functions, multiplicative cutting of fragments from each function along the patch border and additive gluing of the fragments into a single function -- namely the model of approximated dependence. The analytic properties of this approximating glued function appear to be the major distinguishing feature and advantage of the method.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2035
Rudolf Neydorf, Anna Neydorf
Abstract The main difficulties of the mathematical models vehicles creation are defined by strongly nonlinearity of dependences which connect various variables their states and conditions of the movement environment. Most it belongs to aircrafts as aerodynamic interactions are characterized by essential nonlinearity up to discontinuity of variables and their derivatives. Creation process of these models is complicated by high-dimensionality, characteristic for the mechanical movement laws. Experimental creation of the mathematical models (MM) of such dependences is carried out by various mathematical methods of approximation of data. Universal remedies of the solution of the formulated task don't exist. Each of it possesses both benefits, and considerable shortcomings. In this regard the possibilities of a method creation of high-precision analytical approximations of the strongly nonlinear dependences using the analytical functions have been investigated.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2039
Prashant S. Vadgaonkar, Ullas Janardhan
Avionics industry is moving towards fly-by wire aircrafts with less reliance on mechanical systems leading to increase in the complexity of in-flight hardware elements. RTCA/DO-254 and EUROCAE ED-80 plays a vital role in the design assurance of airborne electronic hardware. RTCA/ DO-254 and EUROCAE ED-80 are the industry standards for Design Assurance Guidance for Airborne Electronic Hardware. The two different agencies FAA and EU regulate and apply this design assurance guidance to the regulatory law in CFR and EASA CS respectively. This paper discusses the need for DO-254 /ED-80 certification in Aerospace industry, the advantages and benefits to the avionics manufacturers. The paper presents the study made on similarities and differences between DO-254/ED-80.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2004
M. Parvez Alam, Dinesh Manoharan
In this paper we discuss about the design and development of an “Autonomous Amphibious Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (AAUAV)” that can fly autonomously to the polluted water areas where human accessibility is formidable to test the water quality. The AAUAV system is an integrated multi-copter with tilt rotor capability to facilitate easy landing, navigation and maneuver on water. A 3D CAD model has been designed and analyzed. A specific propulsion system has been devised and lab tested. A proof of concept model has been made and tested in the field with its instruments to ascertain its technical/ operational feasibility. This system can also be tailored to collect and store the water samples from the polluted sites for further comprehensive research at the laboratory. AAUAV system is the novel solution to the polluted environment through a complete integrated system. This will be an effective alternative for the conventional water sampling techniques.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2008
Alexander Grima, Colin Theodore, Oliver Garrow, Ben Lawrence, Linnea Persson
Abstract The Elytron 2S is a prototype aircraft concept to allow VTOL capabilities together with fixed wing aircraft performance. It has a box wing design with a centrally mounted tilt-wing supporting two rotors. This paper explores the aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft using computational fluid dynamics in hover and low speed forward flight, as well as analyzing the unique control system in place for hover. The results are then used to build an input set for NASA Design and Analysis if Rotorcraft software allowing trim and flight stability and control estimations to be made with SIMPLI-FLYD.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2010
Nandeesh Hiremath, Dhwanil Shukla, Narayanan Komerath
Abstract The design of advanced rotorcraft requires knowledge of the flowfield and loads on the rotor blade at extreme advance ratios (ratios of the forward flight speed to rotor tip speed). In this domain, strong vortices form below the rotor, and their evolution has a sharp influence on the aero-dynamics loads experienced by the rotor, particularly the loads experienced at pitch links. To understand the load distribution, the surface pressure distribution must be captured. This has posed a severe problem in wind tunnel experiments. In our experiments, a 2-bladed teetering rotor with collective and cyclic pitch controls is used in a low speed subsonic wind tunnel in reverse flow. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry is used to measure the three component spatial velocity field. Measurement accuracy is now adequate for velocity data, and can be converted to pressure both at and away from the blade surface.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2014
Jonathan M. Rheaume, Charles Lents
Abstract Energy storage options for a hybrid electric commercial single aisle aircraft were investigated. The propulsion system features twin Geared Turbofan™ engines in which each low speed spool is assisted by a 2,500 HP electric motor during takeoff and climb. During cruise, the aircraft is powered solely by the turbine engines which are sized for efficient operation during this mission phase. A survey of state of the art energy storage options was conducted. Battery, super-capacitor, and flywheel metrics were collected from the literature including Specific Energy (Wh/kg), Volumetric Energy Density (Wh/L), Specific Power (W/kg), Cost ($/kWh), and Number of Cycles. Energy storage in fuels was also considered along with various converters sized to produce a targeted quantity of electric power. The fuel and converters include fuel cells (both proton exchange membrane and solid oxide operating on hydrogen or on jet fuel) and a turbogenerator (jet fuel or LNG).
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2018
Syed J. Khalid
Abstract The key commercial aircraft propulsion requirements toward ensuring flight safety, operational efficiency, reduced CO2 footprint, and community acceptability include high installed thrust, low specific fuel consumption, and reduced noise. The objective of this paper is to highlight the various ways turbofan performance can be enhanced. First the advantage of high bypass ratio (BPR) configurations will be explained with the help of clean sheet cycle designs with the corresponding off-design performance. The achievement of hot day performance and improved durability with high BPR designs, and the benefit from core supercharging has been presented. Next, the use of on-line control effector modulations, including variable bypass exhaust nozzle, for further improvement in cruise SFC (up to an indicated 2.6%) is shown. This is followed by a discussion of medium BPR mixed exhaust designs which have a performance advantage compared to the same BPR separate exhaust configurations.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2022
Ajay Rao, Vivek Karan, Pradeep Kumar
Abstract Turbulence is by far the number one concern of anxious passengers and a cause for airline injuries. Apart from causing discomfort to passengers, it also results in unplanned downtime of aircrafts. Currently the Air Traffic Control (ATC) and the meteorological weather charts aid the pilot in devising flight paths that avoid turbulent regions. Even with such tailored flight paths, pilots report constant encounters with turbulence. The probability of turbulence avoidance can be increased by the use of predictive models on historical and transactional data. This paper proposes the use of predictive analytics on meteorological data over the geographical area where the aircraft is intended to fly. The weather predictions are then relayed to the cloud server which can be accessed by the aircraft planned to fly in the same region. Predictive algorithms that use Time series forecasting models are discussed and their comparative performance is documented.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-1990
Nisha Kondrath, Nathaniel Smith
Abstract In aerospace applications, it is important to have efficient, small, affordable, and reliable power conversion units with high power density to supply a wide range of loads. Use of wide-band gap devices, such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) devices, in power electronic converters is expected to reduce the device losses and need for extensive thermal management systems in power converters, as well as facilitate high-frequency operation, thereby reducing the passive component sizes and increasing the power density. A performance comparison of state-of-the art power devices in a 10 kW full-bridge dc-dc buck converter operating in continuous conduction mode (CCM) and at switching frequencies above 100 kHz will be presented in this manuscript. Power devices under consideration are silicon (Si) IGBT with Si antiparallel diodes, Si IGBT with SiC antiparallel diodes, Si MOSFETs, SiC MOSFETs, and enhancement-mode GaN transistors.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-1988
Rodney Yeu, Jason Wells, Chad Miller, Jane Thompson
Abstract Movement toward more-electric architectures in military and commercial airborne systems has led to electrical power systems (EPSs) with complex power flow dynamics and advanced technologies specifically designed to improve power quality in the system. As such, there is a need for tools that can quickly analyze the impact of technology insertion on the system-level dynamic transient and spectral power quality and assess tradeoffs between impact on power quality versus weight and volume. Traditionally, this type of system level analysis is performed through computationally intensive time-domain simulations involving high fidelity models or left until the hardware fabrication and integration stage. In order to provide a more rapid analysis prior to hardware development and integration, stochastic equivalent circuit analysis is developed that can provide power quality assessment directly in the frequency domain.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1996
David R. Markham, J. Michael Cutbirth
Abstract Modern military electronics systems are generating increasingly higher heat loads, necessitating larger capacity thermal management systems (TMSs). These high-capacity TMSs must meet the strict size and weight requirements of these advancing platforms. Commercially available compressor technology can generate sufficient cooling for these systems; however, they are too heavy and expansive. Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a compact, lightweight, high-speed screw compressor that can provide a large cooling capacity with a small package envelope. The compressor housing material is light-weight with a low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), allowing a wide operating temperature range. The compressor, with a nominal cooling capacity from 20 kW to 60 kW, was tested over a range of saturated suction conditions, pressure ratios, rotational speeds, and oil lubrication conditions.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1994
Wei Wu, Yeong-Ren Lin, Louis Chow, Edmund Gyasi, John P. Kizito, Quinn Leland
Abstract For aircraft electromechanical actuator (EMA) cooling applications using forced air produced by axial fans, the main objective in fan design is to generate high static pressure head, high volumetric flow rate, and high efficiency over a wide operating range of rotational speed (1x∼3x) and ambient pressure (0.2∼1 atm). In this paper, a fan design based on a fan diameter of 86 mm, fan depth (thickness) of 25.4 mm, and hub diameter of 48 mm is presented. The blade setting angle and the chord lengths at the leading and trailing edges are varied in their suitable ranges to determine the optimal blade profiles. The fan static pressure head, volumetric flow rate, and flow velocity are calculated at various ambient pressures and rotational speeds. The optimal blade design in terms of maximum total-to-total pressure ratio and efficiency at the design point is obtained via CFD simulation.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2000
Mark Bodie, Thierry Pamphile, Jon Zumberge, Thomas Baudendistel, Michael Boyd
Abstract As technology for both military and civilian aviation systems mature into a new era, techniques to test and evaluate these systems have become of great interest. To achieve a general understanding as well as save time and cost, the use of computer modeling and simulation for component, subsystem or integrated system testing has become a central part of technology development programs. However, the evolving complexity of the systems being modeled leads to a tremendous increase in the complexity of the developed models. To gain confidence in these models there is a need to evaluate the risk in using those models for decision making. Statistical model validation techniques are used to assess the risk of using a given model in decision making exercises. In this paper, we formulate a transient model validation challenge problem for an air cycle machine (ACM) and present a hardware test bench used to generate experimental data relevant to the model.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1998
Michele Trancossi, Jose Pascoa, Carlos Xisto
Abstract Environmental and economic issues related to the aeronautic transport, with particular reference to the high-speed one are opening new perspectives to pulsejets and derived pulse detonation engines. Their importance relates to high thrust to weight ratio and low cost of manufacturing with very low energy efficiency. This papers presents a preliminary evaluation in the direction of a new family of pulsejets which can be coupled with both an air compression system which is currently in pre-patenting study and a more efficient and enduring valve systems with respect to today ones. This new pulsejet has bee specifically studied to reach three objectives: a better thermodynamic efficiency, a substantial reduction of vibrations by a multi-chamber cooled architecture, a much longer operative life by more affordable valves. Another objective of this research connects directly to the possibility of feeding the pulsejet with hydrogen.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2055
Koji Muraoka, Daisuke Hirabayashi, Masayuki Sato, Yoshihisa Aoki
Abstract JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) has been conducting a research on a future commercial tilt wing VTOL (Vertical TakeOff and Landing) transport under JAXA's "Sky Frontier" Program aiming to develop technologies for aircraft innovation. The research focuses on QTW (Quad Tilt Wing) civil VTOL transport, which features tandem tilt wings with propellers mounted at the mid-span of each wing. The goals of the research in the present phase are to propose a concept of a QTW business VTOL transport system and to pursue the essential technologies development such as OEI (One-Engine-Inoperative) safe recovery, transition flight control and cruise efficient aerodynamic design. Nine passengers business QTW concept was designed and trade-off analysis of the propulsion system architecture for OEI safety was conducted.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2025
Amir Fazeli, Adnan Cepic, Susanne Reber
Abstract Aircraft weight and center of mass are two critical design and operational parameters that have to be within a design envelope to ensure a safe and efficient operation of aircraft. Previous efforts to accurately determine aircraft weight and center of mass before takeoff using landing gear shock strut pressures have failed due to the distortion of measured pressures by shock strut seal friction. Currently, aircraft loading process is controlled with loading sheets and passenger/cargo weight estimation as there are no online measurement systems that can accurately and efficiently estimate aircraft weight and determine the center of mass location before takeoff. However, errors in loading sheets, shifting cargo and errors in weight estimation could lead to incorrect loading of aircraft and, consequently, increase the risk of accidents, particularly in cargo flights.
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