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Viewing 1 to 5 of 5
2017-12-01
Book
Ravi Rajamani
The environmental impact of hydrocarbon-burning aircraft is one of the main motivations for the move to electric propulsion in aerospace. Also, cars, buses, and trucks are incorporating electric or hybrid-electric propulsion systems, reducing the pressure on hydrocarbons and lowering the costs of electrical components. The economies of scale necessitated by the automotive industry will help contain costs in the aviation sector as well. The use of electric propulsion in airplanes is not a new phenomenon. However, it is only recently that it has taken off in a concrete manner with a viable commercial future. The Electric Flight Technology: Unfolding of a New Future reviews the history of this field, discusses the key underlying technologies, and describes how the future for these technologies will likely unfold, distinguishing between all-electric (AE) and hybrid-electric (HE) architectures. Written by Dr.
2017-05-18
Book
Jean Broge
Aviation propulsion development continues to rely upon fossil fuels for the vast majority of commercial and military applications. Until these fuels are depleted or abandoned, burning them will continue to jeopardize air quality and provoke increased regulation. With those challenges in mind, research and development of more efficient and electric propulsion systems will expand. Fuel-cell technology is but one example that addresses such emission and resource challenges, and others, including negligible acoustic emissions and the potential to leverage current infrastructure models. For now, these technologies are consigned to smaller aircraft applications, but are expected to mature toward use in larger aircraft. Additionally, measures such as electric/conventional hybrid configurations will ultimately increase efficiencies and knowledge of electric systems while minimizing industrial costs.
2009-10-08
Book
Jean-Pierre Pirault, Martin L.S. Flint
This book explores the opposed piston (OP) engine, a model of power and simplicity, and provides the first comprehensive description of most opposed piston (OP) engines from 1887 to 2006. Design and performance details of the major types of OP engines in stationary, ground, marine, and aviation applications are explored and their evolution traced. The OP engine has set enviable and leading-edge standards for power/weight refinement, fuel tolerance, fuel efficiency, package space, and manufacturing simplicity. For these reasons, the OP concept still remains of interest for outstanding power and package density, simplicity, and reliability; e.g., aviation and certain military transport requirements. Using material from historic and unpublished internal research reports, the authors present the rationale for OP engines, their diverse architecture, detailed design aspects, performance data, manufacturing details, and leading engineers and applications.
2001-08-15
Book
Graham White
This book chronicles the development, production, and application of what was arguably the finest aircraft piston engine ever produced - the Pratt & Whitney R-2800. It powered many of the significant fighters and medium bombers of the conflict, and went on to power many other military and commercial aircraft.
1995-09-01
Book
Graham White
While it took the demands of two World Wars to bring aviation into acceptance by the general public, it was a relative handful of engineers, entrepreneurs, and pilots who positioned the technology and resources necessary to make aviation one of the deciding factors in ending World War II. This book attempts to illuminate some of the historically significant technical developments that were incorporated into World War II aircraft engines that directly contributed to the execution and tactics of the war. Engines detailed in the book include those from these manufacturers: Rolls-Royce Bristol, Napier General Electric Pratt and Whitney Allison Wright Aeronautical Corporation
Viewing 1 to 5 of 5