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Viewing 271 to 300 of 190834
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0555
Ashok Patidar
This paper broadly describes two computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis methods to predict the de-icing phenomenon over the vehicle windshield and front side windows. 1 Solid Modeling Method: In this method, the windshield and window glasses are modeled as solid and 2 Shell Modeling Method: Here, windshield and side window glasses are modeled as shell elements and considered as wall with defined thickness as input condition to capture the correct heat transfer effect due to the conduction and convection from warm air to ice layer. The CFD analyses by both methods are done in two key-steps: a) First, steady state velocity distributions for several different defroster flow rates are calculated; b) Secondly, based on the pre calculated velocity fields, the defogging time is estimated. The solidification and melting model is used to simulate the ice melting process over the glasses available with commercial CFD software Fluent.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0554
Felix Regin
The influence of environmental changes on underhood and underbody components of a vehicle is an important issue in new vehicle design as increased engine power, cabin comfort demands and package space limitations create an increasingly difficult problem to solve. Sufficient airflow needs to be available for adequate cooling of the underhood components. The amount of air mass flow depends on the underhood geometry details: positioning and size of the grilles, fan operation, and the positioning of the other underhood components. This paper describes a prediction methodology that significantly streamlines the process of passenger car underhood thermal management by utilizing state-of-the-art computer simulation of airflow. The methodology uses a complete 3-D CAD model of all pertinent underhood components of a passenger car with a general purpose Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code to simulate underhood airflow.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0595
Qianwang Fan, Zongjie Hu, Jun Deng, Liguang Li, Yi You, Jingyan Hu
This paper presents the simulation of in-cylinder stratified mixture formation, spray motion, combustion and emissions in a four-stroke and four valves direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine with a pent-roof combustion chamber by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The Extended Coherent Flame Combustion Model (ECFM), implemented in the AVL-Fire codes, was employed. The key parameters of spray characteristics related to computing settings, such as skew angle, cone angle and flow per pulse width with experimental measurements were compared. The numerical analysis is mainly focused on how the tumble flow ratio and geometry of piston bowls affect the motion of charge/spray in-cylinder, the formation of stratified mixture and the combustion and emissions (NO and CO₂) for the wall-guided stratified-charge spark-ignition DISI engine.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0591
Philipp Adomeit, Rolf Weinowski, Jens Ewald, Andre Brunn, Henning Kleeberg, Dean Tomazic, Stefan Pischinger, Markus Jakob
Advanced technologies such as direct injection DI, turbocharging and variable valve timing, have lead to a significant evolution of the gasoline engine with positive effects on driving pleasure, fuel consumption and emissions. Today's developments are primarily focused on the implementation of improved full load characteristics for driving performance and fuel consumption reduction with stoichiometric operation, following the downsizing approach in combination with turbocharging and high specific power. The requirements of a relatively small cylinder displacement with high specific power and a wide flexibility of DI injection specifications lead to competing development targets and additionally to a high number of degrees of freedom during optimization. In order to successfully approach an optimum solution, FEV has evolved an advanced development methodology, which is based on the combination of simulation, optical diagnostics and engine thermodynamics testing.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0593
Ben Twiney, Richard Stone, Xiangdong Chen, Gavin Edmunds
In the catalyst heating operation for a spray guided DISI (Direct Injection Spark Ignition) engine, split injection has been shown to improve combustion stability which is critical for the trade-off between tailpipe emissions and vehicle idle NVH [ 1 ]. The spray guided DISI engine has a multi-hole injector centrally located in the chamber with the spark plug. For catalyst heating operation, the first injection occurs during induction, which forms a relatively well mixed but lean mixture in the cylinder before ignition, and the second injection occurs close to a retarded ignition, which produces a stratified fuel rich mixture in the central region of the combustion chamber. Combustion initialization is found to be sensitive to spark plug protrusion and orientation, injector orientation and 2 nd injection timing relative to ignition [ 1 ].
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0598
Walter F. Piock, Peter Weyand, Edgard Wolf, Volker Heise
The success of stratified combustion is strongly determined by the injection and ignition system used. A large temporal and spatial variation of the main parameters - mixture composition and charge motion - in the vicinity of the spark location are driving the demands for significantly improved ignition systems. Besides the requirements for conventional homogeneous combustion systems higher ignition energy and breakdown voltage capability is needed. The spark location or spark plug gap itself has to be open and well accessible for the mixture to allow a successful flame kernel formation and growth into the stratified mixture regime, while being insensitive to potential interaction with liquid fuel droplets or even fuel film. For this purpose several different ignition concepts are currently being developed. The present article will give an ignition system overview for stratified combustion within Delphi Powertrain Systems.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0600
Christophe Pfister, Soeren Bernhardt, Ulrich Spicher
Spray-guided gasoline direct injection demonstrates great potential to reduce both fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. However, conventional materials used in high-pressure pumps wear severely under fuel injection pressures above 20 MPa as the lubricity and viscosity of gasoline are very low. The use of ceramic components promises to overcome these difficulties and to exploit the full benefits of spray-guided GDI-engines. As part of the Collaborative Research Centre “High performance sliding and friction systems based on advanced ceramics” at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, a single-piston high-pressure gasoline pump operating at up to 50 MPa has been designed. It consists of 2 fuel-lubricated sliding systems (piston/cylinder and cam/sliding shoe) that are built with ceramic parts. The pump is equipped with force, pressure and temperature sensors in order to assess the behaviour of several material pairs.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0596
Diana Martin, Jochen Stratmann, Philipp Pischke, Reinhold Kneer, Ming-Chia Lai
In present GDI engines, multiple injection strategies are often employed for engine cold start mixture formation. In the future, these strategies may also be used to control the combustion process, and to prevent misfiring or high emission levels. While the processes occurring during individual injections of GDI injectors have been investigated by a number of researchers, this paper concentrates on the interactions of multiple injection events. Even though multiple injection strategies are already applied in most GDI engines, the impact of the first injection event on the second injection event has not been analyzed in detail yet. Different optical measurement techniques are used in order to investigate the interaction of the two closely timed injection events, as well as the effect of dwell time and the in-cylinder conditions. The injector investigated is a GDI piezo injector with an outwardly opening needle.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0597
Yunlong Bai, Zhi Wang, Jianxin Wang
Knocking is the main obstacle of increasing compression ratio to improve the thermal efficiency of gasoline engines. In this paper, the concept of stratified stoichiometric mixture (SSM) was proposed to suppress knocking in gasoline engines. The rich mixture near the spark plug increases the speed of the flame propagation and the lean mixture in the end gas suppresses the auto ignition. The overall air/fuel ratio keeps stoichiometric to solve the emission problem using three way catalysts (TWC). Moreover, both the rich zone and lean zone lead to soot free combustion due to homogeneous mixture. The effect on the knocking of homogeneous and stratified mixture was studied in a direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine using numerical simulation and experimental investigation respectively.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0601
Atsushi Matsumoto, Wayne R. Moore, Ming-Chia Lai, Yi Zheng, Matthew Foster, Xing-Bin Xie, David Yen, Keith Confer, Eunjoo Hopkins
Operation of flex fuel vehicles requires operation with a range of fuel properties. The significant differences in the heat of vaporization and energy density of E0-E100 fuels and the effect on spray development need to be fully comprehended when developing engine control strategies. Limited enthalpy for fuel vaporization needs to be accounted for when developing injection strategies for cold start, homogeneous and stratified operation. Spray imaging of multi-hole gasoline injectors with fuels ranging from E0 to E100 and environmental conditions that represent engine operating points from ambient cold start to hot conditions was performed in a spray chamber. Schlieren visualization technique was used to characterize the sprays and the results were compared with Laser Mie scattering and Back-lighting technique. Open chamber experiments were utilized to provide input and validation of a CFD model.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0577
Jessica L. Brakora, Rolf D. Reitz
A numerical study was performed to compare the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), collectively termed NOx, resulting from biodiesel and diesel combustion in an internal combustion engine. It has been shown that biodiesel tends to increase NOx compared to diesel, and to-date, there is no widely accepted explanation. Many factors can lead to increased NOx formation and it was of interest to determine if fuel chemistry plays a significant role. Therefore, in order to isolate the fuel chemistry from mixing processes typical in a compression ignition engine, sprays were not considered in the present investigation. The current study compares the NOx formation of surrogates for biodiesel (as represented by methyl butanoate and n-heptane) and diesel (n-heptane) under completely homogeneous conditions. Combustion of each fuel was simulated using the Senkin code for both an adiabatic, constant volume reactor, and an adiabatic, single-zone HCCI engine model.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0576
Matthew J. McNenly, Mark A. Havstad, Salvador M. Aceves, William J. Pitz
Three integration strategies are developed and tested for the stiff, ordinary differential equation (ODE) integrators used to solve the fully coupled multizone chemical kinetics model. Two of the strategies tested are found to provide more than an order of magnitude of improvement over the original, basic level of usage for the stiff ODE solver. One of the faster strategies uses a decoupled, or segregated, multizone model to generate an approximate Jacobian. This approach yields a 35-fold reduction in the computational cost for a 20 zone model. Using the same approximate Jacobian as a preconditioner for an iterative Krylov-type linear system solver, the second improved strategy achieves a 75-fold reduction in the computational cost for a 20 zone model. The faster strategies achieve their cost savings with no significant loss of accuracy.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0575
Gen Shibata, Tomonori Urushihara
An HCCI combustion has a low temperature heat release (LTHR) and a high temperature heat release (HTHR). During the LTHR period, fuel chemicals break down into radicals and small hydrocarbons, and they assist an initial reaction of HTHR. This is an important role of LTHR. On the contrary, LTHR has a negative aspect. In general, a heating value of LTHR changes depending on HCCI engine load due to the difference of the injected fuel quantity. The heating value of LTHR is low under low load condition, and the heating value of LTHR is high under high load condition. This leads to the changes of the starting crank angle of HTHR against engine load and it is a nuisance problem for the control of HCCI engine operation. Therefore, a fuel which exhibits the constant LTHR phasing against engine load would be preferable.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0574
Jonathan Etheridge, Sebastian Mosbach, Markus Kraft, Hao Wu, Nick Collings
A Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) has been used to simulate the transition from Spark Ignition (SI) mode to Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode in a four cylinder in-line four-stroke naturally aspirated direct injection SI engine with cam profile switching. The SRM is coupled with GT-Power, a one-dimensional engine simulation tool used for modelling engine breathing during the open valve portion of the engine cycle, enabling multi-cycle simulations. The model is initially calibrated in both modes using steady state data from SI and HCCI operation. The mode change is achieved by switching the cam profiles and phasing, resulting in a Negative Valve Overlap (NVO), opening the throttle, advancing the spark timing and reducing the fuel mass as well as utilising a pilot injection. Experimental data is presented along with the simulation results.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0581
Rentaro Kuroki, Akira Kato, Eiichi Kamiyama, Daisaku Sawada
The potential of high efficiency zero-emission engines fueled by hydrogen, which is regarded as a promising form of energy for the future, is being researched. The argon circulated hydrogen engine [ 1 ] is one system theoretically capable of achieving both high efficiency and zero emissions, and its feasibility for use in vehicles has been studied. Specifically, tests were performed to verify the following issues. It was examined whether stable hydrogen combustion could be achieved under an atmosphere of argon and oxygen, which has a high specific heat ratio, and whether the substantial thermal efficiency improvement effect of the argon working gas could be achieved. An argon circulation system was also studied whereby steam, which is the combustion product of the hydrogen and oxygen emitted from the engine, is separated by condensation to enable the remaining argon to be re-used.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0580
Richard Stone, Huayong Zhao, Lei Zhou
A single-cylinder Gasoline Direct Injection Engine (GDI) engine with a centrally mounted spray-guided injection system (150 bar fuel pressure) has been operated with stoichiometric and rich mixtures. The base fuel was 65% iso-octane and 35% toluene; hydrogen was aspirated into a plenum in the induction system, and its equivalence ratios were set to 0, 0.02, 0.05 and 0.1. Ignition timing sweeps were conducted for each operating point. Combustion was speeded up by adding hydrogen as expected. In consequence the MBT ignition advance was reduced, as were cycle-by-cycle variations in combustion. Adding hydrogen led to the expected reduction in IMEP as the engine was operated at a fixed manifold absolute pressure (MAP). An engine model has also been set up using WAVE. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were measured with a Cambustion DMS500 particle sizer.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0579
Victor M. Salazar, Sebastian A. Kaiser
This paper examines the interaction of bulk flow and jet-induced fuel convection in an optically accessible hydrogen-fueled engine with direct injection. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of gaseous acetone as a fuel tracer was performed to obtain quantitative images of the hydrogen mole-fraction in the operating engine. With the engine motored, fuel was injected into inert bulk gas from a centrally located injector during the compression stroke. The injector had a single-hole nozzle with the jet angled at 50 degrees with respect to the vertical injector axis. Two parameters were varied in the experiments, injector orientation and tumble intensity, and for each of these, the injection timing was varied. Image series of the mean fuel mole-fraction between injection and near-TDC crank angles capture the mixture-formation process for each configuration and injection timing.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0578
Yan Yan, Zhang Yu-Sheng, Chen Yong-Tian, Chen Zu-Di, Xiao Ge
Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is considered as a clean and high effective combustion technology. Alternative fuel Dimethyl Ether(DME) has some problems in HCCI combustion mode, such as narrow stable conditions and higher unregulated emissions. In this research, a single cylinder diesel engine zs195 was applied to HCCI operation, methanol and DME were fueled to the engine by fuel injection system with an electric controlled port in dual fuel mode. Regulated DME and methanol proportions can significantly expand the stable HCCI operation and obtained over a broad speed and load region. The emission tests indicated that NOx and smoke emissions were overall very low under normal HCCI operation, while HC and CO emissions were much higher than conventional CI-engines. HC and CO emissions increased with methanol content but reduced with output power.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0586
Avoki Michel Omekanda, Todd Geib, Dan Buehler, Kirk Wan, Lucille G. Lavan
Gasoline Direct Injection (GDi) system is a relatively new technology. In early implementations, its major components, i.e. high pressure fuel pump, injectors, and fuel rails, emit objectionable acoustic noise during normal operation. This paper will focus on making an objective comparison (assessment) of acoustic noise emitted by several cam-driven high pressure fuel pumps during their normal operation, especially at engine idle. Taguchi robust engineering methods will be used to conduct the robust assessment study of six GDi high-pressure pumps. A-weighted total sound pressure level (SPL), processed from two free-field microphones around each pump, will be used as the main function in the Taguchi design of experiments (DOE).
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0585
Paul Whitaker, Yuan Shen, Christian Spanner, Heribert Fuchs, Apoorv Agarwal, Kevin Byrd
Gasoline turbocharged direct injection (GTDI) engines, such as EcoBoost™ from Ford, are becoming established as a high value technology solution to improve passenger car and light truck fuel economy. Due to their high specific performance and excellent low-speed torque, improved fuel economy can be realized due to downsizing and downspeeding without sacrificing performance and driveability while meeting the most stringent future emissions standards with an inexpensive three-way catalyst. A logical and synergistic extension of the EcoBoost™ strategy is the use of E85 (approximately 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline) for knock mitigation. Direct injection of E85 is very effective in suppressing knock due to ethanol's high heat of vaporization - which increases the charge cooling benefit of direct injection - and inherently high octane rating. As a result, higher boost levels can be achieved while maintaining optimal combustion phasing giving high thermal efficiency.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0584
Atsushi Shimada, Takao Ishikawa, Shuichi Kajitani
Hydrogen produced from regenerative sources has the potential to be a sustainable substitute for fossil fuels. A hydrogen internal combustion engine has good combustion characteristics, such as higher flame propagation velocity, shorter quenching distance, and higher thermal conductivity compared with hydrocarbon fuel. However, storing hydrogen is problematic since the energy density is low. Hydrogen can be chemically stored as a hydrocarbon fuel. In particular, an organic hydride can easily generate hydrogen through use of a catalyst. Additionally, it has an advantage in hydrogen transportation due to its liquid form at room temperature and pressure. We examined the application of an organic hydride in a spark ignition (SI) engine. We used methylcyclohexane (MCH) as an organic hydride from which hydrogen and toluene (TOL) can be reformed. First, the theoretical thermal efficiency was examined when hydrogen and TOL were supplied to an SI engine.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0590
John E. Kirwan, Mark Shost, Gregory Roth, James Zizelman
Today turbo-diesel powertrains offering low fuel consumption and good low-end torque comprise a significant fraction of the light-duty vehicle market in Europe. Global CO₂ regulation and customer fuel prices are expected to continue providing pressure for powertrain fuel efficiency. However, regulated emissions for NO and particulate matter have the potential to further expand the incremental cost of diesel powertrain applications. Vehicle segments with the most cost sensitivity like compacts under 1400 kg weight look for alternatives to meet the CO₂ challenge but maintain an attractive customer offering. In this paper the concepts of downsizing and downspeeding gasoline engines are explored while meeting performance needs through increased BMEP to maintain good driveability and vehicle launch dynamics. A critical enabler for the solution is adoption of gasoline direct injection (GDi) fuel systems.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0582
Sebastian Verhelst, Joachim Demuynck, Steven Martin, Michael Vermeir, Roger Sierens
Hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (H₂ICEs) are an affordable, practical and efficient technology to introduce the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier. They are practical as they offer fuel flexibility, furthermore the specific properties of hydrogen (wide flammability limits, high flame speeds) enable a dedicated H₂ICE to reach high efficiencies, bettering hydrocarbon-fueled ICEs and approaching fuel cell efficiencies. The easiest way to introduce H₂ICE vehicles is through converting engines to bi-fuel operation by mounting a port fuel injection (PFI) system for hydrogen. However, for naturally aspirated engines this implies a large power penalty due to loss in volumetric efficiency and occurrence of abnormal combustion. The present paper reports measurements on a single-cylinder hydrogen PFI engine equipped with an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and a supercharging set-up.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0589
Michele Kaiser, Uwe Krueger, Roderick Harris, Luke Cruff
Due to the rising costs of fuel and increasingly stringent regulations, auto makers are in need of technology to enable more fuel-efficient powertrain technologies to be introduced to the marketplace. Such powertrains must not sacrifice performance, safety or driver comfort. Today's engine and powertrain manufacturers must, therefore, do more with less by achieving acceptable vehicle performance while reducing fuel consumption. One effective method to achieve this is the extreme downsizing of current direct injection spark ignited (DISI) engines through the use of high levels of boosting and cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Key challenges to highly downsized gasoline engines are retarded combustion to prevent engine knocking and the necessity to operate at air/fuel ratios that are significantly richer than the stoichiometric ratio.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0588
David B. Roth, Philip Keller, Michael Becker
It has been clearly demonstrated separately, that the application of both Dual Cam Phasers (DCP) and External Cooled EGR systems are highly beneficial to improving the efficiency of highly-boosted GDI engines. DCP systems can optimize the volumetric efficiency at WOT conditions, improve boost and transient response at low engine speeds, and provide internal EGR at low RPM part-load conditions. External cooled EGR has been demonstrated to dramatically improve the fuel consumption, lower turbine inlet temperature, and improve emissions at high power conditions. In previous investigations by the BorgWarner Engine Systems Group, we showed that full engine speed/load range EGR coverage can be obtained by combining High Pressure Loop and Low Pressure Loop external EGR systems with a DCP strategy.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0587
Luke Cruff, Michele Kaiser, Steven Krause, Roderick Harris, Uwe Krueger, Matthew Williams
The Ethanol-Boosted Direct Injection (EBDI) demonstrator engine is a collaborative project led by Ricardo targeted at reducing the fuel consumption of a spark-ignited engine. This paper describes the design challenges to upgrade an existing engine architecture and the synergistic use of a combination of technologies that allows a significant reduction in fuel consumption and CO₂ emissions. Features include an extremely reduced displacement for the target vehicle, 180 bar cylinder pressure capability, cooled exhaust gas recirculation, advanced boosting concepts and direct injection. Precise harmonization of these individual technologies and control algorithms provide optimized operation on gasoline of varying octane and ethanol content.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0415
Dongkon Lee, Myung Han Lee, Kang-Duck Ih, Moo-Sang Kim, Franck Perot, Minsuk Kim, David Freed
Acoustics comfort is a key point for the ground transportation market and in particular in the automotive area. A significant contributor to the noise levels in the cabin in the range 200Hz to 3000Hz is the HVAC (Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning) system, consisting of sub-systems such as the air intake duct, thermal mixing unit, blower, ducts, and outlet vents. The noise produced by an HVAC system is mainly due to aeroacoustics mechanisms related to the flow fluctuations induced by the blower rotation. The structure borne noise related to the surface induced vibrations and to the noise transmission through the dash or plastic panels may also contribute but is not considered in this study. This study presents a digital approach for HVAC aeroacoustics noise predictions related to the ducts and outlet vents. In order to validate the numerical method flow and acoustics measurements are performed on production HVAC systems placed in an anechoic room.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0377
Jianfeng Ma, Joshua David Summers, Paul Joseph, Avinash Kolla
In this paper, in support of developing an advanced non-pneumatic lunar tire, a dynamic interaction model between non-pneumatic tire and sand is presented using the Finite Element Method (FEM). This non-pneumatic tire is composed of three major components: a critical shear beam, two inextensible circumferential membranes, and deformable spokes. The non-pneumatic tire made of segmented cylinders is described in detail. The tire is treated as an elastic deformable body with the inertia effect is included. Lebanon sand found in New Hampshire is modeled as because of the availability of a complete set of material properties in the literature. The Drucker-Prager/Cap plasticity constitutive law with hardening is employed to model the sand. Numerical results show contact pressure distribution, distributions of various stresses and strains, deformation of non-pneumatic tire, and deformation of sand.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0414
Avnish Gosain, Mugundaram Ravindran
One of the most common NVH refinement areas of a vehicle is the cabin booming noise. The current study discusses the improvement of the low frequency booming noise in the cabin of a small passenger car. The practice of reinforcing experimental evaluation results with the extensive use of computer aided engineering tools in the development process is presented in this paper. The structural changes executed in the vehicle, to reduce noise contribution, are iterated and optimized using simulation and validated using experimental analysis methods like operational modal analysis, linear frequency response functions and actual run-up measurements. Additionally, the interesting variation of the NVH characteristics of a vehicle due to the changeover from a 4-cylinder inline to a 3-cylinder inline powertrain, while inheriting the similar body structure, is discussed in this study.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0378
Xiaobo Yang
In this study, a full vehicle with advanced LMS comfort and durability tire (CDT) model was established with ADAMS software to predict the spindle loads of the vehicle under a severe proving ground rough road event. From a series of simulations with various design changes, the spindle loads sensitivities to those design changes were identified. The simulated results were also compared with the measured data and a good correlation was achieved.
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