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Viewing 161941 to 161970 of 169674
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification has been "CANCELLED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of June 1996.
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification is superseded by a series of individual specifications covering specific forms of this material. The requirements of the individual specification applicable to the form required shall be fulfilled whenever reference is made to this specification.
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification has been 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of September 1996. Alloy: Alclad 6061-T4 (Sheet)/6061-T451 (Plate) UNS Number: A86061
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet and plate.
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification covers a 100% homopolymer of polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) in the form of rods, sheets, and molded shapes. Primarily for parts requiring chemical inertness and high impact strength up to 200 degrees C (392 degrees F) or high-frequency electrical insulating properties up to 165 degrees C (329 degrees F).
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification covers a butyl (IIR) rubber in the form of sheet, strip, extrusions, and molded shapes. These products have been used typically for parts, such as diaphragms, gaskets, grommets, and seals, requiring resistance to phosphate esters or low permeability to gases, but usage is not limited to such applications. The material is not suitable for use in contact with petroleum-base fluids due to excessive swell. Each application should be considered individually.
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification establishes the engineering requirements for producing chemical-film coatings on aluminum alloys and the properties of such coatings.
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of seamless round tubing.
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification covers the requirements for electrodeposited hard chromium plate.
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification establishes the engineering requirements for producing chemical-film coatings on aluminum and aluminum alloys and the properties of such coatings. Primarily for aluminum and aluminum alloys where increased corrosion resistance, improved paint adhesion, or a low-electrical resistance coating is required. Also useful for improving the corrosion resistance and paint adhesion properties of abraded or discontinuous anodized surfaces of aluminum and aluminum alloy parts.
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification covers a butyl (IIR) rubber in the form of sheet, strip, tubing, extrusions, and molded shapes.
Standard
1953-02-01
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings or heading.
Magazine
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
DOUGLAS C. WILLIAMS
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
W. GRIEVE
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
H. G. Bolton
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
VINCENT ATRES
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
H.M. BRAMBRRY
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
O. T. KREUSSER
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
H. S. White, O. Enoch, A. L. Haynes
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
C. R. JOHNSON, D. N. HARRIS
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
VERNON ROOSA
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
WILLIAM B. ANDERSON
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
R. V. VANDEN BERG
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
J. G. McNAB, M. E. CONN, D. S. McARTHUR, K. L. STEHLE
The Standard Oil Development Company has developed a new test for evaluating the sludge handling ability of lubricants. Oil Sludging Test measures the sludge handling ability of lubricants in terms of the time required to reach 50% oil screen plugging in cyclic laboratory engine operation. The manner in which sludge builds up in this test is similar to the way it builds up in field engines. Results correlate very well with those obtained in low temperature, stop-and-go field service. The test conditions were chosen after studying the conditions found to be conducive to sludge formation in the field. A six cylinder, overhead valve engine is modified by enlarging the piston ring gaps to increase blow-by. It is then run in 4 hour cycles. Each cycle includes 1-1/2 hours of idle with 115°F. oil temperature and 2 hours of loaded operation with 180°F. oil temperature. This is followed by a 1/2 hour shutdown under cold conditions. Periodic inspections of the oil screen are made as the test progresses and the per cent oil screen plugging is plotted against time.
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
E. L. SCHAPER
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
LUDWIG G. BOEHNER

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