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Viewing 161941 to 161970 of 185640
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AIR1191
Method: A general method for the preliminary design of a siingle, straight-sided, low subsonic ejector is presented. The method is based on the information presented in References 1, 2, 3, and 4, and utilizes analytical and empirical data for the sizing of the ejector mixing duct diameter and flow length. The low subsonic restriction applies because compressibility effects were not included in the development of the basic design equations. The equations are restricted to applications where Mach numbers within the ejector primary or secondary flow paths are equal to or less than 0.3. Procedure: A recommended step-by-step procedure is shown. Equations: The equations used in the procedure, as well as their derivations, are given. Sample Calculation: A sample calculation is presented to isllustrate the use of the basic method.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS2506A
This specification covers the requirements for application to fasteners of a corrosion and heat resistant aluminum coating material having a thermosetting inorganic binder and the properties of the finished coating.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
ARP1061
This ARP provides performance criteria for Altitude Alerting Devices and Systems. These devices can be self-contained or receive remote altitude information and can have integral or remote barometric corrections. Only the generation of the laerting signals is covered by this recommended practice and not the details of the visual or audio alerts operated by these signals. It is recommended that the system's operational correspondence between the selected altitude settings of the Altitude Alerting Device and the Altitude Level Indication normally used to control the aircraft should not exceed ±250 ft RSS throughout the operating range of the device.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5860
This specification covers a corrosion and moderate heat-resistant steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5642E
This specification covers two types of free-machining, corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, and forging stock.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5701
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings. These products have been used typically for parts requiring good machinability and high strength at room and cryogenic temperatures for short-time use up to 1000 degrees F (538 degrees C), particularly parts which are welded and then precipitation heat treated to develop required properties, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5702
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings. These products have been used typically for parts requiring a combination of resistance to creep and stress-rupture up to 1300 degrees F (704 degrees C), oxidation resistance up to 1800 degrees F (982 degrees C), and good machinability, particularly parts which are welded and then precipitation heat treated to develop required properties, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5605
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate 1.00 inch (25.4 mm) and under in nominal thickness. These products have been used typically for parts requiring good machinability and high strength at room and cryogenic temperatures and for short-time use up to 1000 degrees F (538 degrees C), particularly for those parts which are formed or welded and then heat treated to develop required properties, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5606
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS3091
This specification covers a mold release agent in the from of a liquid. This produce has been used typically for application to molds used in the fabrication of plastic and elastomeric components, but usage is not limited to such applications. Mold release agent will function up to 480 degrees C (896 degrees F) without deterioration or transferring to the part surface.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5646F
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS3837
This specification covers "S" glass in one style of woven fabric with an HTS-904 finish. This cloth has been used typically as a reinforcing material for structural plastic laminates, but usage is not limited to such applications. Cloth is also suitable for use with phenolic and epoxy resin matrices.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS2437
This specification covers the engineering requirements for applying coatings to parts by the plasma spray process and the properties of such coatings.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5557C
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of seamless or welded and drawn tubing.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS7304B
This specification covers coiled springs fabricated from carbon-steel wire.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5556B
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of seamless or welded and drawn tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts requiring both corrosion and heat resistance, especially when such parts are welded during fabrication, but usage is not limited to such applications. The alloy provides oxidation resistance up to 1500 degrees F (816 degrees C) but is useful at that temperature only when stresses are low.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5544B
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AIR1223
Liquid supply systems for breathing oxygen for the crew and/or passengers of transport aircraft require design and installation considerations, which are detailed herein. AIR 825, Oxygen Equipment for Aircraft, contains general information on determination of breathing oxygen requirements and equipments for the crew and passengers of transport category aircraft. This document covers the more specific requirements for either a 70 or 300 psig liquid oxygen system. The standard 70 psig nominal pressure is recommended for use except in cases of excessive pressure drop, flow requirements, and some continuous flow regulators which may require the 300 psig nominal pressure system. AS 861, Minimum General Standards for Oxygen Systems and AIR 822, Oxygen Systems for General Aviation Aircraft, also contain general applicable information.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5566E
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of two types tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts, such as high pressure hydraulic systems up to 3000 psi (20.7 MPa), requiring corrosion and heat resistance up to 700 degrees F (371 degrees ), but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5640K
This specification covers three types of a free-machining, corrosion-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, and forging stock.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
J921B_197111
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a laboratory test procedure for evaluating the head impact characteristics of such areas of an automotive instrument panel as may be required to meet impact performance established for the protection of lap-belted front seat occupants.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5567A
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of seamless or welded tubing.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS2430G
This specification covers the engineering requirements for automatic peening of surfaces of parts by impingement of metallic shot, glass beads, or ceramic shot. To induce residual compressive stress in surface layers of parts, thereby increasing fatigue strength and resistance to stress-corrosion cracking but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5645H
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AMS5764
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, extrusions, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, extruding, or flash welded rings. These produces have been used typically for parts requiring excellent corrosion resistance and high strength from -423 degrees to +1100 degrees F (-253 degrees to +593 degrees C) and for welded parts without subsequent heat treatment, but usage is not limited to such applications.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
ARP982A
Primarily to provide recommendations concerning minimizing stress corrosion cracking in wrought titanium alloy products.
1971-10-26
Technical Paper
710831
A. E. Felt, S. R. Krause
The results of a comprehensive test program using a 1969 383-CID V-8 engine at two compression ratios-9.5:1 and 7.6:1-are reported. Compression ratio changes were effected by piston changes only. Except for necessary ignition timing modifications, no other changes were made in the engine. The effects of compression ratio changes on exhaust emissions and fuel consumption were studied in steady-state dynamometer tests and in vehicle tests. At MBT ignition timing or at the same percentage power loss from MBT timing at each compression ratio and with identical carburetion, decreasing the compression ratio from 9.5:1 to 7.6:1 produced the following results: 1. In steady-state dynamometer tests, NO (ppm) and CO (%) emissions were unchanged, HCs (ppm) were decreased, and fuel consumption was increased when equal power was developed at both compression ratios. 2. In vehicle tests using the 7-mode Federal Test Procedure, NO and CO emissions were unchanged and HCs increased somewhat.
1971-10-20
Technical Paper
1971-12-0014
C. H. Pulley
The seat belt-shoulder harness restraint system is recognized as the most efficient, economical, available means of saving lives and reducing injuries in automobile accidents. A recent survey indicates that in accidents involving speeds up to 60 mph not a single motorist who was wearing seat belt-shoulder harnesses were killed. A recent report issued by a major auto-maker states that the seat belts-shoulder system is more effective from both a cost and life-saving point of view than the air bag or other presently proposed passive restraint systems. Despite the over-whelming evidenence and a concentrated public education program only about one-third of the American motoring public avails themselves of the protection of lap belts and less than 5% use shoulder harnesses.
CURRENT
1971-10-01
Standard
ARP1181A
ABSTRACT
HISTORICAL
1971-10-01
Standard
ARP1181
ABSTRACT

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