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Viewing 161941 to 161970 of 169792
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540240
R.E. VanDeventer, Forest McFarland
THE control of residual stresses in automotive cylinder blocks is discussed in this paper. According to the authors, this study was started because a small percentage of castings was being scrapped because of cooling cracks in the valve compartment wall. They discovered that the greatest single factor in inducing trapped stresses in castings is too great a difference in the cooling rates for different portions between 1400 F and 600 F. They also found out that residual tensile stresses can be eliminated in a particular section by keeping its cooling rate at least as fast as that of other significant sections. Moreover, it is possible to move trapped stresses from one section to another by overcooling. They have also developed a method that gives quantitative results that serve as good index values of the trapped stresses present even in complex castings.
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540175
R. W. THOMAS
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540237
J.C. McNab, L.E. Moody, N.V. Hakala
MOLECULAR weight or volatility has been found to be the most important factor in determining the extent to which a lubricant contributes to combustion-chamber deposits and octane requirement. Bright stock appears to be particularly harmful. Crude source (or variation in predominating hydrocarbon type) seems to have little effect. These authors report further that commercially practical mineral-base oils have been developed that show a significant advantage over previously known conventional lubricants in their ability to prevent these deposits and octane requirement increase when used with a conventional leaded fuel. Moreover, they say that SAE 5W-20 motor oils can be made that give a 4-5-octane advantage over conventional motor oils in preventing detonation. They point out, further, that, although progress has been made, even better lubricants and fuels are needed, in this respect.
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540176
L. GRANT HECTOR
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540238
Bruno Loeffler
INCREASING fuel prices and fuel taxes have forced engine builders to find ways to better engine specific fuel consumption in order to help operators survive the onslaught of increased operating costs. This paper explains how an improved combustion system has yielded up to 15% improvement in fuel consumption. This system was arrived at by analysis of those previous combustion systems which held most promise. The resulting direct-injection open combustion chamber is described here.
1954-01-01
Standard
AMS4025D
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet and plate.
1953-12-01
Magazine
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS3087C
1. SCOPE: 1.1 Form: .This specification covers a highly viscous, non-melting, heat-stable silicone sealing compound, , 1.2 Application: Primarily for sealing joints in high tension electrical connections, aircraft engine I ignition systems, and electronic equipment and as a lubricant for components fabricated from elastomers. Compound is not recommended for use on silicone rubber parts subject to temperatures in excess of 150°C (300°F) and is to be avoided on or near any surfaces which subsequently are to be painted or adhesive bonded.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS5053B
ABSTRACT
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS5120D
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of strip. This product has been used typically for heat treated springs, spring pins, shims, spacers, and other applications where spring temper is required, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS5361B
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of sand or centrifugal castings.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS5668D
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or heading. These products have been used typically for parts, such as bolts, turbine blades, and turbine seals, requiring oxidation resistance and high strength at 1250 to 1500 degrees F (675 to 816 degrees C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS5630C
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, and forging stock.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS6351
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS5542D
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS5733A
A vendor shall mention this specification number and its revision letter in all quotations and when acknowledging purchase orders. Bars, forgings, and stock for forging or heading. Primarily for parts and assemblies, requiring high strength up to 1250 degrees F (677 degrees C).
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS3315B
This specification covers a silicone (VMQ) rubber reinforced with glass cloth. This product has been used typically for gaskets or seals requiring a thin, resilient, nonporous sheet material suitable for operating from -55 to +205 degrees C (-67 to +401 degrees F), but usage is not limited to such applications. This material is resistant to deterioration by weathering and petroleum-base engine oil and remains flexible over the temperature range noted. This material is not normally suitable for use in contact with gasoline or aromatic fuels and low-aniline-point petroleum-base fluids due to excessive swelling of the elastomer.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS3274A
This specification covers nylon-cloth-reinforced acrylonitrile-butadiene (NBR) rubber in the form of sheet and of shapes molded and cured from partly cured sheet.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS3285A
This specification covers felted wool fibers in the form of sheets and rolls. This product has been used typically for oil retention in installations which do not compress the felt, for feeding low-viscosity or light oil, and where unusual strength and hardness are required for such parts as washers, bushings, wicks, and other parts where resistance to wear and abrasion are required, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS3286A
This specification covers felted wool fibers in the form of sheets and rolls. This product has been used typically for oil and grease retention where the felt is confined and compressed in assembly and for dust shields where conditions are not severe, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS2232B
This specification covers established inch/pound manufacturing tolerances applicable to carbon steel sheet, strip, and plate ordered to inch/pound dimensions. These tolerances apply to all conditions unless otherwise noted. The term 'excl' is used to apply only to the higher figure of the specified range. Tolerances for products sizes not listed herein shall be as agreed upon by purchaser and vendor.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS2261B
This specification covers established manufacturing tolerances applicable to bars, rods, and wire of nickel, nickel alloy, and cobalt alloys ordered to inch-pound dimensions. These tolerances apply to all conditions, unless otherwise noted. The term "excl" is used to apply only to the higher figure of a specified range. Where the terms “nickel”, “nickel-copper”, “nickel-chromium”, “nickel-molybdenum”, “nickel-molybdenum-chromium”, and “cobalt” are used without qualification, they refer to both non-heat-treatable and heat-treatable alloys as applicable, unless otherwise noted.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS3170B
This specification covers a blend of alcohols and esters in the form of a liquid.
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS7247B
ABSTRACT
1953-12-01
Standard
AMS5352
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of investment castings. These castings have been used typically for parts requiring hardness up to 58 HRC and having resistance to corrosion and to wear, but usage is not limited to such applications. Optimum corrosion resistance is obtained by hardening from 1850 to 1950 °F (1010 to 1066 °C) and tempering at not higher than 800 °F (427 °C).

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