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Viewing 161941 to 161970 of 176083
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640515
Anthony Yablonski
This report describes a nonconventional tooling procedure for machining thin-wall titanium pressure tank components. Machining had to be performed with a minimum restraint to avoid any stress buildup which could have an adverse effect on subsequent welding operations. In addition, precise contour and wall thickness tolerances had to be maintained. The tooling method described consists of backing up the workpiece with hydrostone material to withstand the dynamic forces acting between cutting tool and part.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640516
J. R. Stitt
The serious problem of distortion as caused by arc welding on large structures is discussed. An explanation is given not only as to the cause of the distortion but how the engineer can anticipate the direction it will take. Some of the available means of control are discussed, and “Paul Bunyan” size examples are given to illustrate what can be done to control distortion.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640513
E. S. Nichols, J. A. Burger, D. K. Hanink
Recently there have been many new developments in aluminum-base diffusion coatings as well as with other coating materials for protection of metal parts in high temperature oxidizing environments. Evaluation is described of many of these coatings on three separate laboratory test devices, for determining (1) resistance to erosion in a high velocity high temperature oxidizing atmosphere, (2) resistance to cracking and oxidation in a thermal fatigue test, and (3) sensitivity to light impact damage at elevated temperatures. Experience with diffused aluminum base coatings on some turbine engine components is discussed, and limitations of the evaluated coatings are cited.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640514
F. P. Talboom, A. D. Joseph, E. F. Bradley
Several columbium base alloys in coated sheet form were evaluated for use as gas turbine engine vane materials. These alloys included FS-85, D-43, Cb-752, and Cb-132. This article describes the mechanical properties of these alloys and the various tests performed during the study. Based on strength, ductility, and weldability, D-43 was found to be satisfactory for use as a turbine vane material. Turbine vanes were subsequently fabricated from D-43, using a welded sheet metal airfoil joined to forged platforms. The product was finish machined to hardware within drawing requirements, coated, and engine tested.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640511
Vernon A. Taylor
This interim report compares 135 approach and landing accidents that have occurred in calendar years 1959-1963 with the original study, “Critical Factors in Approach and Landing Accidents,” prepared for the Flight Safety Foundation by Otto E. Kirchner. The accidents contained in this paper represent 56% of the total number presently under study by the Flight Safety Foundation and to be included in a final report.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640512
David D. Thomas
Accident prevention is one of the FAA's prime statutory responsibilities. Some of the efforts in carrying out these responsibilities are described in this paper, and the following FAA programs are briefly explained: (1) an air carrier maintenance system of establishing airworthiness alert values so that timely maintenance can be performed, (2) outline of a concentrated program to prevent false fire warnings, (3) development and expansion of positive control in Air Traffic Service, (4) flight checking of airline captains by special trained inspectors, (5) participating in CAB-FAA schooling on accident investigation, and (6) dissemination of safety literature in the general aviation field.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640475
James F. Blose, Joseph F. McCartney
New concepts for submarine propulsion plants are continuously being presented to the Navy for review and possible application. An analytical method is now being used to determine the effect of powerplant weight and thermal efficiency on the cruising radius, speed, and vessel displacement. A mathematical model representing the propulsion plant and vessel hull was prepared and, by means of a digital computer, the effects of varying several design parameters were studied. By comparing the predicted performance of several types of powerplants with the results of the computer study, it is possible to select those which justify further development for Navy use.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640476
A. W. Percy, W. A. Forrest, G. A. Olson
A review of the Pure Oil Performance Trials conducted at Daytona International Speedway are presented. Background information pertaining to conducting of tests, design of the equipment, and instrumentation required for the various events are discussed. The performance trials have evolved into three basic tests -- Economy, Acceleration, and Braking. The objective of the Performance Trials is to provide data that motorists can utilize in evaluating new cars and selecting new models.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640477
Miles L. Brubacher, Donel R. Olson
Surveys of smog forming pollutants from the exhaust of the California car population have shown a tremendous range of emissions between the worst and the best cars. The California MVPCB conducted a study at Scott Research Laboratories to determine the effectiveness and cost of various tune-up approaches to the auto exhaust emission problem. Four phases of tune-up were explored and pertinent facts and data are included in this paper. Three major engine systems affecting emissions of older cars are ignition, carburetion, and exhaust valve leaks. Exhaust control is predicted to be a $150,000,000 annual business and the incentive exists to develop more effective and cheaper control systems.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640478
R. I. Kreisler
This paper describes a tanking system developed for the Air Force intercontinental ballistic missile, one that has been used successfully on many notable space missions. Requirements, problems encountered, and performance to date are discussed in detail, and the critical factors involved in operation are related precisely to the design characteristics of this automatic system.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640472
Warren N. Riker
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640471
Arthur J. Wojtowicz
The technical specialty Value Engineering, conceived during World War II in General Electric Co., today is recognized as an effective approach for product improvement and technological advancement, and for cost reduction. In recent years, many consumer and defense industries have augmented their efforts to reduce product costs by introduction of value engineering programs. This paper: (1) provides a history of value engineering; (2) describes philosophy and techniques of value engineering; (3) demonstrates the effectiveness and acceptance of value engineering by presenting results of programs instituted in several companies; and, (4) relates experiences and procedures at Eclipse-Pioneer Div. of Bendix. The case study is presented with emphasis on the impact value engineering has on top management and management personnel.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640474
L. G. Wilder
An analysis is made of the factors which influence the selection of equipment by contractors working overseas. The nature and size of the job, availability of equipment, availability of parts and service, and final disposition of the equipment are some of the basic guidelines determining type of equipment to be used. The author recommends that equipment manufacturers not sell equipment overseas until it is proved in the field and it is a standardized model with adequate availability of parts in the foreign country.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640468
B. Vandermar
Seal elastomers are processed on conventional rubber equipment. The usual operations performed are mixing, extruding, molding, and finishing. Seals and gaskets are also made by the lathe cutting process and by die cutting from sheet stock. The advent of special high temperature and fluid resistant polymers has not caused abnormal problems in processing. Conventional equipment has been usable for the fabrication of specialty seals and gaskets.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640473
Floyd B. Lux
Recent developments in combat vehicle mobility requirements have affected engine characteristics such as minimum fuel consumption, agility, power, extended operating capability, instant starting, and trouble free operation. This paper discusses these trends in relation to the needs of the military and explains how specifications define the factors that satisfy these trends.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640470
W. J. Lux
A study of diesel engine endurance test data proved that the failure rate characteristics of a complex machine such as a diesel engine are similar to failure characteristics of missile and electronic equipment, at least in a qualitative case. This paper studies a formal reliability program as it might be applied to complex mechanical devices. The existence of much field data on diesel engines provides an excellent base for a reliability program in that industry.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640467
George S. McGrath
Rapid improvements in earthmoving equipment require guidelines by which to judge service life of machines. This article investigates the factors of usage, environmental effects, and obsolescence in projecting replacement periods of units in three different categories. The economic advantages of replacement are discussed from the viewpoints of cost and production capacity, and suggestions are given for salvaging obsolescent but serviceable units.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640469
R. W. Malcolmson
This paper describes the characteristics of nitrile rubbers, polyacrylates, silicone rubbers, and fluoroelastomers for fluid seals. Their structure and its influence on properties is described. Both original physicals and resistance to oils, heat, and low temperatures are covered. The danger of drawing general conclusions from tests in one fluid is illustrated.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640464
Aldo H. Bagnulo
For the first time, the free world has undertaken construction of an operational spaceport from which man will rocket to the moon and perhaps the planets. On Merritt Island, in Florida, the launch site for the Saturn V/Apollo moon vehicle, is being built on 88,000 acres of swampland and marsh just west and north of Cape Kennedy. Under direction of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, an industrial area of more than 50 buildings and a tremendously intricate launch complex ate well underway The design and construction problems encountered in this program are unique in many cases and point the way for building projects of the future.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640463
J. H. Kerkering
The paper discusses the “special requirements” that modern warfare, both strategic and nonstrategic, places on earth-moving equipment, because of the speed with which work must be done; the environmental conditions that must be met; the lack of repair facilities, skilled operators, and mechanics; and the need for cross-country mobility and air transportability; it considers the equipment the Army is working on now to fill these requirements, as well as the equipment the Army would like to have to fill these requirements. Eleven “blue sky” special purpose machines for which the need is urgent and real are described. The author concludes that industrial know-how and cooperation are essential to meeting the new Army’s requirements for earthmoving machines.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640466
W. E. SCHILKE
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640491
Kenneth Catlin
In order to establish a propellant depletion system for propulsion shutdown on the Atlas space launch vehicle, design criteria have been closely examined to meet the unique environmental requirements in this particular application. A survey of the different types of liquid level sensing systems in common usage has indicated that the magnetostrictive sensor combines the best qualifications available, and also possesses a high degree of ruggedness and resistance to shock. This paper describes the Atlas space launch vehicle fuel depletion system currently under development and test at General Dynamics/Astronautics. The objective of this program is to produce a system exhibiting the highest possible reliability and performance.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640465
Orwald E. Kienow
Advances in telemetry have produced techniques for the observation of phenomena that were not previously amenable to mensuration. An analysis of types of sensors such as mechanical, generator, resistive, and reactive is presented together with data pertaining to their operation. Means of transmitting and recording sensor data are also evaluated. Improvements in telemetry indicate that future testing equipment will be simpler, more reliable, and will operate with a greater degree of accuracy.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640492
C. E. Oestreich
The Dynamic Simulator facility provides operational simulation of the complete navigation subsystem for the present Polaris class submarines as well as major portions of subsequent classes. The simulation utilizes general purpose analog computer equipment in conjunction with realistic and operative displays and controls to represent the overall operational conditions of the subsystem. This facility is used to analyze interactions, transients, and steady-state performance levels which otherwise could not be readily studied, and to train navigation personnel by presenting realistic displays of system performance.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640493
Marvin Fischthal, Arthur Walsh
Part task trainers are an integral and important group of training devices now being used in the manned space programs. These devices are used to train the astronauts in discrete portions of a flight profile. It may operate one day as a rendezvous trainer and the next as a lunar landing trainer. The device consists of a computer complex, simulated cabin interior, external out-the-window display, and an instructor's complex. Arriving at a design philosophy requires a good working knowledge of the purpose of this type of trainer and the state of the art of various electronic, optical, and mechanical devices required by the trainer. Selecting the computer and optical systems is a difficult task requiring many compromises and trade-offs to arrive at the best and most economical system possible.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640494
R. E. BATES, AIRCRAFT DIVISION
The profit-making potential of a new aircraft is determined at the design stage. Maximum profit equates directly to the sum of the design features that reduce direct operating costs. This is a challenge to the designer's ingenuity. The new Douglas DC-9 is discussed in terms of the influence of design on operating costs. Specific design features which affect the cost of flying operation, fuel, maintenance, and depreciation are presented in an economic context.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640487
D. E. Wright
A typical nucleonic propellant gaging and utilization system for space vehicles is described, together with a detailed discussion of the individual components. Photographs of prototype installations and test results of these configurations are presented to substantiate the theoretical analyses for signal propagation and radiation pattern mapping including measurements under zero gravity conditions. The results are concluded as verifying the nucleonic measurement system capability for providing an accurate, highly reliable approach to maximum cost effectiveness of propellant gaging and utilization system design.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640488
Richard Q. Boyles, Lane Barnett
Development of regenerative and high bypass ratio propulsion systems and laminar flow control systems hold promise for aircraft systems that will transport very large payloads over considerably longer ranges and provide airborne endurance considerably greater than those presently achievable. This paper presents broad parametric study to ascertain tradeoff between range and endurance versus design cruise speed for aircraft powered by turbofan, cruise fan, and turboprop propulsion systems. The potential for each type of propulsion system is projected for various design configurations and results of several side studies indicate effects of ground rule changes, mixed powerplant arrangements, and refueling.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640489
John T. Kutney
Consideration of the high bypass ratio, tip turbine cruise fan for long range and long endurance aircraft is presented. Thermodynamic analysis and installation aerodynamic criteria are discussed. The analysis includes a comparison of the turbojet, low bypass turbofan, and high bypass cruise fan systems with the same gas generator cycle. Significant test program accomplishments on the cruise fan system are presented, as well as suggested aircraft installations. The tip turbine cruise fan is shown to have unique multiple bypass ratio characteristics with high take-off thrust ratings, low specific fuel consumption levels, and high speed potential.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640483
W. E. Crane
Significant factors in the selection of a nonpropulsive power system are the mission, power requirements, mass, size, ease of integration, compatibility with the space environment, reliability, and availability. Through 1970, one-day missions will probably use batteries. Since longer missions may require a trade-off of mass for longer use time, fuel cells can be employed. Photovoltaic generators are suitable for power requirements below 10 kw. Larger power requirements and extended missions will require the further development of mechanical, thermoelectric, thermionic, and isotopic generators.

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