Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 161941 to 161970 of 174152
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS7260A
This specification covers a fuel and low-temperature resistant butadiene- acrylonitrile (NBR) rubber in the form of molded rings. These rings have been used typically for gland type packings and seals in flexible couplings for use at temperatures from -55 degrees to 100 degrees C (-67 to 212 degrees F) where resistance to fuel is required, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620271
G. L. Borman, John H. Johnson
Single droplet theory is used to simulate the behavior of fuel sprays in high-speed open-chamber diesels. A model for sprays in still air is presented which includes the air motion induced by the spray. Calculated paths and vaporization histories for droplets injected into swirling air are also presented. It is shown that the paths of vaporizing drops are closely approximated by solid sphere calculations. The effects of swirl speed, engine rpm, and squish air motion are also investigated.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS4013A
This specification covers aluminum and aluminum alloy foil in the form of laminated sheet.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5800
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-tungsten-arc or gas-metal-arc welding of parts fabricated from alloys of similar composition, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5550A
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet and strip.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620508
R. V. Kerley, K. W. Thurston
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620404
D.F. HAGEN, G.W. HOLIDAY
Abstract To determine the influence of engine variables on the composition of exhaust gas, engine dynamometer tests were conducted on single and multi-cylinder reciprocating engines. The following engine variables were investigated: air-fuel ratio, power output, engine speed, spark timing, exhaust back pressure, valve overlap, combustion chamber deposits, and intake manifold pressure. Hydrocarbon concentrations were found to be considerably affected by changes in air-fuel ratio, spark timing, intake manifold pressure, and combustion chamber deposits. Somewhat less change in hydrocarbon concentration was obtained by varying valve overlap and engine speed. Changes in engine power output and exhaust back pressure had little effect on hydrocarbon concentrations. Carbon monoxide concentrations were principally affected by changes in the air-fuel ratio. No other variables affected carbon monoxide concentration except where air-fuel ratio was indirectly influenced.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620153
M. W. JACKSON, W. M. WIESE, J. T. WENTWORTH
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS7271C
This specification covers a butadiene-acrylonitrile (NBR) rubber in the form of molded rings.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS7279A
This specification has been declared "SUPERSEDED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of 10/17/90.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620043
E. J. Forster, R. H. Klein
This paper presents the results of a study cooperatively undertaken by The Standard Oil Company (Ohio) and Ethyl Corporation to determine the feasibility of a “road blending number” for a gasoline component. Volumetric averaging of such blending numbers would permit direct calculation of the road octane number of a gasoline blend. The prediction system based on road blending values is designed to provide refiners with a method more accurate and convenient than those presently used for blending gasoline to meet road octane specifications. For this investigation, 80 blends were formulated from 4 components typical of those used in premium gasoline. Three of the components - alkylate, light reformate, and light catalytic distillate - were combined in various proportions to yield 16 base fuels. Heavy reformate was added to each of these base fuels in five concentrations to provide a broad range for examining its blending behavior.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620531
Harold Flynn, Peter Kyropoulos
Abstract A requirement for larger trucks and higher operating speed is indicated. The present report presents wind tunnel data on drag of a Chevrolet truck-trailer combination. Possible means of drag reduction are examined. Although side force and yawing moment data are presented, their effect on directional stability are not, at present analyzed.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5825
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of welding wire.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS4135J
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of die forgings, hand forgings, rolled rings, and stock for forgings on rolled rings. Primarily for applications, such as aircraft structural members, requiring material with moderately high strength. Certain design and processing procedures may cause these forgings to become susceptible to stress corrosion cracking; ARP 823 recommends practices to minimize such conditions.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620126
William K. Hodson
Beginning with the value of measuring and controlling maintenance work and the impracticality of customary approaches, the stage is set for the introduction of Universal Maintenance Standards (UMS). Explanation of UMS concept follows four factors essential to success of the plan: standard work groupings, spread sheets, bench mark jobs, and development of standard times. Job preparation, travel time, and allowances are discussed. Effectiveness of UMS is shown by a chart on carpentry shop's performance change after UMS installation. Control procedures and forms are discussed.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS7272A
This specification covers a butadiene-acrylonitrile (NBR) rubber in the form of molded rings. These rings have been used typically as sealing rings in contact with diester synthetic lubricants in service up 150 degrees C (302 degrees F), but usage is not limited to such applications. The cross-section of such rings is usually not over 0.275 inch (6.98 mm) in diameter or thickness.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620238
E. F. Farrell
The cooling problem associated with automatic hydro-dynamic drive transmissions is discussed in the over-all context of the various factors that affect cooling circuit performance. Among these are pressure control, thermal capacity, rate of heat generation, oil temperature, and heat transfer. Examples of typical cooling system performance are presented, including design features and geometry of the fluid circuits used to obtain the test data.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS7270E
This specification covers a butadiene-acrylonitrile (NBR) rubber in the form of molded rings.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620370
M. Bruce Smith, Samuel E. Susman
A literature survey on existing commercial adhesives suggested for very low temperature application demonstrated the superiority of the nylon-epoxy adhesives. A series of most promising existing adhesives was selected and evaluated more completely at very low temperature, again demonstrating the superiority of the nylon-epoxy systems. Development work was aimed at adhesive systems applicable to field application and included filler and expansivity studies, metal surface preparations, and composite adhesive studies. Three adhesives were developed which demonstrate an excellent coverage of the program's target objectives. Extensive data are presented for these three developed adhesive systems.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS3346A
This specification covers a silicone rubber in the form of sheet, strip, tubing, molded shapes, and extrusions. These products have been used typically for parts required to operate or seal at temperatures from -90 to +205 degrees C (-130 to +401 degrees F), compounded especially for high strength, but usage is not limited to such applications. Silicone elastomer is resistant to deterioration by weathering and aircraft piston engine oil and remains flexible over the temperature range noted. These products are not normally suitable for use in contact with gasoline or aromatic fuels and low-aniline-point petroleum-base fluids due to excessive swelling of the elastomer.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS4153B
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded bars, rods, wire, shapes and tubing. These products have been used typically for parts requiring good strength and where fabrication does not usually involve welding, but usage is not limited to such applications. Certain design and processing procedures may cause these extrusions to be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking; SAE ARP 823 recommends practices to minimize such conditions.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS4164A
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded bars, rods, wire, profiles, and tubing. These products have been used typically for parts subject to excessive warpage during machining, and for parts requiring high strength and whose fabrication does not normally involve welding, but usage is not limited to such applications. Certain design and processing procedures may cause these extrusions to be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking; SAE ARP 823 recommends practices to minimize such conditions.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS4165A
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded bars, rods, wire, profiles, and tubing. These extrusions have been used typically for parts subject to excessive warpage during machining due to residual stresses and for parts requiring high strength and whose fabrication does not normally involve welding, but usage is not limited to such applications. Certain processing procedures may cause these extrusions to be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking; SAE ARP 823 recommends practices to minimize such conditions.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5542G
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS4127B
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of die forgings, hand forgings, forged rings, rolled rings, and stock for forgings and rings.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS2262C
This specification covers established manufacturing tolerances applicable to sheet, strip, and plate of nickel, nickel alloys, and cobalt alloys ordered to inch/pound dimensions. These tolerances apply to all conditions, unless otherwise noted. The term "excl" is used to apply only to the higher figure of a specified range.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620532
J. M. Tyler, T. G. Sofrin
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS5362D
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of investment castings. These castings have been used typically for structural parts, where welding during fabrication may be required, for use up to 1500 °F (816 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS4132A
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of die forgings, hand forgings, rolled rings, and forging stock. These products have been used typically for rotating parts operating in service up to 450 °F (232 °C) and other parts operating up to 600 °F (316 °C) at low stresses, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1962-01-01
Standard
AMS7278A
This specification has been declared "SUPERSEDED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of 10/17/90. Use AMS 7276 or 7280

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: