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Viewing 161941 to 161970 of 173095
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600423
ROGER A. LONG
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600420
K. F. MILLER
The applications for solid propellant gas generators in the Guided Missile field are discussed. Characteristics are related to their applicability in specific areas. Desirable properties of propellant and other gas generator components are cited, based on such factors as the effect of exhaust gases on turbine, gas valves, and other missile components. Design features are described which result in the capability of solid generators to perform reliably and reproducibly after temperature cycling and other environmental tests. Schematic diagrams of a typical solid generator are shown for orientation. Components critically affecting reliability and reproducibility are indicated. The importance in the reliability and reproducibility picture of various components within the gas generator itself is discussed.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600418
M. D. LAMOREE
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600432
A. K. HANNUM
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600433
C. O. DURBIN
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600430
JOHN PEET
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600431
I. N. BISHOP
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600428
WILLIAM L. JOHNSTON
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600429
M. L. PENNELL
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600426
HAROLD W. ADAMS
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600427
F. S. NOWLAN
This paper presents the quantitative relationship which has been found to exist in the case of a widely used transport airplane reciprocating engine between: (a) The probability of requiring unscheduled removal for premature overhaul, and (b) The operating time since overhaul. This first relationship is used to: (a) Determine the relationship between direct maintenance costs and overhaul periodicity, and (b) To evaluate the economic incentive which exists with regard to alleviation of reliability problems which are experienced in service.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600409
CAPTAIN ROBERT F. ADICKES
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600407
A. H. LEFEBVE, T. DURRANI
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600408
R. H. THOMAS
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600406
D. G. BAY, J. H. HILL
Continental Aviation and Engineering Corporation has developed a simple, lightweight, inexpensive afterburner using a pyrophoric fuel. A mixture of Triethylaluminum (TEA) and Trimethylaluminum (TMA) was selected to permit operation at combustion velocities considerably higher than those encountered in regular JP-4 afterburners. The auto-ignition and high flame speed characteristics of the pyrophoric fuel have speeded the development program in that only a minimum of flame stabilizer and fuel injector development was necessary. Combustion instability phenomena, common in conventionally fueled burners, have not appeared and the reason for the smooth combustion may provide a. new insight into combustion kinetics. Safe methods of handling the fuel and purging the system have been developed and are explained in the paper.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600405
F. L. SMITH, N. BURGESS
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600404
W. D. STINNETT, J. S. ROBBINS, D. HOLZMAN
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600403
EDWARD W. OTTO, RICHARD A. FLAGE
Experimental data are presented for the stability and noise characteristics of the combustion chamber at oxidant-fuel ratios of 9.0 and 15.67 while thrust was varied over a 6:1 range by means of throttle valves in the propellant lines. The predominant frequency of the chamber pressure oscillation throughout the throttling range is approximately 200 cps with the exception that, at chamber pressures near 100 psia and an oxidant-fuel ratio of 15.67, an apparent combustion instability occurs with a frequency of oscillation of approximately 75 cps. The amplitude of the oscillation as a percent of combustion-chamber pressure varies from approximately 2% at the higher chamber pressures (390 to 250 psia) through a peak of approximately 12% at chamber pressures between 80 and 100 psia to under 4% below 60 psia. Data for an engine startup from essentially zero flow conditions to a final chamber pressure of 100 psia and an oxidant-fuel ratio of 9.0 are also included.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600402
G. F. RABIDEAU, D. L. SCHLOREDT
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600417
J. N. CHRISTIANSEN
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600416
S. C. ATCHISON
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600413
G. R. REWERTS, P. J. SWANSON
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600414
S. L. SHAW, C. H. STEVENSON
SUMMARY Since this is a relatively new field, the methods of performing the tests have not become standardized and a vide variety of methods are being tried. A description of tests using the various methods tried by the authors of this paper are presented together with the reasons why the particular methods were chosen.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600412
D. M. BADGER, C. D. BROWNFIELD
Procedures are presented which permit prediction of the strength remaining in hardened metallic materials after complex temperature and stress exposures. These are based primarily on application of rate-process theory in the form of the time-temperature parameter T(C + log t) to the overaging or annealing reaction. The approach is reviewed in detail for the aluminum alloy 7075-T6. Generalized curves covering strength in tension, compression, bearing, and shear at several test temperatures after a wide variety of unstressed and stressed thermal exposure conditions were developed for this alloy. Application of the same basic approaches to other alloys is also discussed.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600410
JAMES A. ALDRICH
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600244
LEONARD J. NUTTALL, MANNING L. BALCOM

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