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Viewing 161941 to 161970 of 164124
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
W. W. Lowther
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
E. W. Jahn
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
W. L. Losson
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
S. D. Heron, A. L. Beall
SUMMARY It is stated that in cases where cylinder distortion produces exhaust valve leakage, the problem of valve burning becomes one of considerable difficulty. A flexible exhaust valve seat, which apparently conforms to the valve and produces a tight seat even though the cylinder head be distorted, has been designed and tested. Apparently complete sealing of the valve was secured in a cylinder known to be subject to exhaust valve seat distortion. This result indicates that heat dissipation through the seat is not of major importance when a tight seal of the valve is secured. The use of flexible inserts may remove some present limitations on cylinder design.
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
HARLAN D. FOWLER
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
E. J. W. Ragsdale
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
J. W. Lord
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Joseph A. Anglada
This paper contains a general discussion of the trends of truck construction touching upon such subjects as cab over engine, six wheel, and all wheel driven vehicles. Comments are made on various parts, such as axles, engines, etc. A comparison of English truck design as affected by legal requirements and design as affected by S.A.E. proposed standards of weight and size limitations is included.
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Billings Wilson
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Chris Bockius, John Bassett
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
G. P. Young
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Joseph T. Morris
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
O. A. Axelson
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Francis B. Flahive
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
A.D. Meals
TWO general divisions of precision cylindrical grinding are described and illustrated in this paper-the centertype and the centerless. Accurate centertype grinding depends principally on four basic general principles: construction of the machine and required fixtures; grain and grade of grinding wheel; correct work speed; and the human element. A rigid machine is necessary to eliminate vibration. Grain and grade of the grinding wheel depend upon the size of material and work being ground, amount of stock removed, and the required finish. Correct work speed is essential to maximum grinding-wheel life, desired stock removal, and required finish. Procedure for proper centering of work is outlined. By means of specific examples described in detail, varied applications of cylindrical grinding to automotive parts, as well as to billiard balls and fountain pens, are presented. These examples describe equipment for multiple-wheel, eccentric, and contour grinding, and show applications of in-feed and through-feed methods.
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
E.S.L. Beale, R. Stansfield
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Arch F. Campbell
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
J.M. Davies, E.W. Jackson, G.C. Riegel
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
F. A. Brooks
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Charles H. Stanard
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Joseph L. Stromme
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
A. L. Beall
THIS paper describes the more conventional methods of selecting an oil for use in high-output aircraft engines. It points out the weaknesses of each and justifies the selection of the engine test at high output as the most reliable criterion. The necessity for oils of better lubricating quality is established based on experience with high-output engines. A full-scale engine test of oils is urged not only as a basis for selection of an oil that will permit operation of the engine at high output but for another and equally important reason. It is equally important to determine that the oil selected will not be responsible for high maintenance costs and early and frequent replacement of parts. The paper endeavors to show that carefully conducted engine tests provide information from which oils can be selected resulting in distinct operating economies and probably improved reliability of operation.
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Philip H. Smith
THIS paper sketches the tourist-trailer industry as it is today in order to provide a valid base for a consideration of its future. It points out that the status of the trailer is still undetermined and that the direction of its development depends in large measure upon whether it is considered by the public and officials to be a vehicle of travel or a home. Ultimate use may force a new conception of what a trailer should be. Engineering design of important units is surveyed to show current practice and to reveal trends; likewise, to bring forward controversial issues and problems that need to be attacked. The possibilities and probabilities of legislative regulation and control also are discussed, and the significance of measures are portrayed as factors affecting both production and design.
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
E. Martin, C. F. Baker
THE development work that resulted in the Hamilton standard constant-speed control is discussed briefly, and the various types of controls that were evolved during the development are described. The present control is described in detail both as to the design characteristics and the operation in conjunction with the propeller. The design requirements of the governing principle employed are discussed briefly.
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
F. W. Caldwell, E. Martin, T. B. Rhines
VARIOUS types of automatic controllable propellers are discussed to show that constant-speed operation will, in general, give the most satisfactory airplane performance. Some attention is given to the aerodynamics of the constant-speed propeller, and its effects on performance are described, with reference to the usual characteristics such as cruising speed and rate of climb. Certain new performance possibilities that result from this type of operation are discussed.
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
A. M. Rothrock
RECENT tests conducted at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory have shown that considerable improvement in the performance of the compression-ignition engine can be obtained by the use of a displacer piston. To observe the effects of the displacer piston on the air flow, and the effects of the air flow on the fuel spray and flame formation, high-speed motion pictures have been taken at the rate of 2200 exposures per sec. of these phenomena in the combustion chamber of the N.A.C.A. combustion apparatus. This apparatus consists of a single-cylinder test engine which is operated under its own power for a single cycle. A vertical-disc combustion-chamber was employed, the sides of which were formed by two 2½-in. glass windows. A single 0.020-in. fuel-injection nozzle was used so that the effects of the air flow on the spray distribution could be visualized easily. By using “Schlieren” photography the air flow, fuel injection, and flame formation were recorded simultaneously. When the motion pictures are projected, the phenomena can be observed at 1/150th of their actual speed.
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Edwin H. Land
THE perfect, hypothetical headlight is visualized, and a set of standards formulated that makes night driving as safe as day driving, with the illumination invisible to approaching cars. Theory of glare elimination with polarized light is presented. The nature of “Polaroid” and how it solves the problem is pointed out. The new engineering and lighting problems, which the use of this material involves, are discussed. Examples of the use of the new control of light for industry are related.

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