Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 163861 to 163890 of 173774
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580218
CHARLES W. SWIFT
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580222
F. J. WEHMER
An attempt is made to define an adhesive and to discuss the subject from the standpoint of why adhesives are used, which adhesives are used, how to use adhesives, and an attempt to evaluate where the use of adhesives may go in the future.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580216
RICHARD H. COOK
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580219
CHARLES S. KNOX
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580214
G. H. BROWN
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580217
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580215
D. C. WOODS
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580212
R. P. POWERS
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580213
W. L. SEMON, M. A. REINHART
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580211
E. H. WALLACE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580210
R.H. SPELMAN
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580208
RICHARD P. SEELIG
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580209
T. A. RIEHL
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580207
Carl C. Runyon
The difficulties of outdoor testing for performance of engines, heaters, defrosters, fuel-induction systems and other automotive components are discussed, with illustrations from a typical winter expedition. How these problems are overcome by cold room testing, and practical procedures for reproducing natural problems in the laboratories are outlined. Necessary precautions and specialized equipment are treated with examples from Ford's cold room laboratories.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580206
D.L. McBRIDE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580204
B. M. DUNHAM
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580205
F.R. KISHLINE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580203
M. L. KALINOWSKI, L. D. LA CROIX, R. A. NEJDL
Motor oils contribute to combustion-chamber deposits and therefore to octane-requirement increase (ORI) and surface ignition. An investigation of the separate components of motor oils in laboratory engines showed that base oils add the largest increment to ORI, viscosity-index improvers add less, and detergents and inhibitors add the least. Surface ignition is reduced by phosphorus, barium, calcium, and zinc ─ elements commonly found in motor-oil additives. Phosphorus is especially effective; all tested additives containing it were equally effective at the same concentration of phosphorus. The components chosen for a motor oil determine how much it will contribute to ORI and surface ignition. A good choice of base stock, viscosity-index improver, and detergent for an SAE 10W-30 oil gives an ORI 6 octane numbers lower than a poor choice. Similarly, choosing phosphorus-containing detergents and inhibitors reduces octanes needed to suppress surface ignition as much as l4 units.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580202
R. L. PONTIOUS
Abstract Recent changes in design and performance requirements associated with the trend to higher power outputs have accentuated wear problems in modern engines and have stressed the need for development of suitable lubricants to prolong the useful life of these engines. The need for better motor oils has necessitated the development of better wear tests for predicting lubricant performance. Wear is determined directly by physical measurements of worn parts, and indirectly by measurement of material worn off a radioactive engine component. Both of these general methods are necessary for a comprehensive evaluation of modern engine lubricants. This paper describes several laboratory test techniques used in determining wear in both single-cylinder and multi-cylinder engines and their applicability to specific wear problems affecting lubricant development. Piston ring, piston pin, and valve train wear under various operational conditions are discussed.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580201
W. C. CONOVER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580199
DAVID P. CUMMING
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580200
R. E. McAFEE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580198
G. A. SMITH
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580196
R. H. HUNGER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580195
THEODORE W. SELBY
The behavior of motor oils at low temperatures is obviously important to the performance of the motor. Low temperature cranking speeds have been shown to be dependent on the viscosity, and in a previous paper the author has shown that the viscosity characteristics of motor oils at these temperatures may be unusual, especially when they contain Viscosity Index Improvers. In this paper the author has analyzed the results of 250 cranking tests conducted at temperatures from +3° to −35°F. These results were compared using the viscosities as determined in a moderate shear viscometer and as extrapolated and calculated by the ASTM chart and a recently published analytical technique.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580194
JOHN C. HAMAKER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580193
J. M. CHERRIE, M. J. TAUSCHEK
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580192
P. C. Paterson
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580191
JAY S. PASMAN
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580190
MARTYN V. CLARKE

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: