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Viewing 163861 to 163890 of 169808
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490198
OLIVER K. KELLEY
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490197
L. C. WOLCOTT
ALTHOUGH the wiring systems of trucks are relatively simple and rather accessible for repair and replacement, the author explains that the amount of wire used on buses is much larger and, furthermore, the wires have to run all over the vehicle, thus becoming an inseparable component of the bus. Wires could be readily replaced if conduits and junction boxes were used but, the author says, their cost would be prohibitive. Rather, he looks to the use of insulating materials having longer life, which would give trouble-free wiring systems at a reasonable cost.
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490196
C. H. Van Hartesveldt
IT has been demonstrated that high compression ratio engines can operate with an appreciable reduction in gasoline consumption. However, it is apparent that these engines cannot be made available to the public until additional antiknock quality is provided in the fuel used. The method of antidetonant injection is submitted as one means by which these more economical engines can be operated in the very near future. Gasoline engines require high antiknock quality gasoline only when they are at or near full throttle. Most ground vehicles operate under these conditions but a small part of the time, making it economical to supply an antidetonant only when it is needed. An alcohol-water-tetraethyl lead antidetonant used through a fully automatic device will give octane numbers at costs competitive with refinery methods according to the author. In taxicabs, for example 19 to 25 road octane numbers can be added to a base gasoline with a consumption of 4.0 gal of antidetonant per 100 gal of gasoline.
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490195
D. W. ERSKINE
SEVERAL factors must be balanced to attain a successful and economical clutch design. These factors are listed by the author as: 1. Torque capacity of clutch. 2. Total spring force. 3. Mean frictional radius. 4. Number of friction surfaces. 5. Coefficient of friction.
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490194
J. M. HODGE
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490193
JOSEPH M. COLBY
IN filling out its line of transportation equipment, Col. Colby says that the Ordnance Department is making a sincere effort to accept or adapt commercial products when commercial counterparts exist. He compares the newly developed wheeled cargo carriers with World War II wheeled transportation units to indicate that important advances have been made in design to ensure reliable performance in the combat zone. He mentions a number of important developments that have been achieved within lower vehicle curb weight limitations, such as: 100% more horsepower. Infinitely variable transmission. Flotation tires. Sealed brakes. Central tire inflation system. Military 24-v electrical system. Locking differentials. Interchangeable closed and open cabs. Greater cargo capacity.
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490141
S. A. McKEE, J. F. SWINDELLS, H. S. WHITE, W. MOUNTJOY
In the past, most of the work with the SAE E.P. Lubricants Testing Machine has been confined to the testing of the load-carrying capacity of gear lubricants under certain fixed operating conditions which simulate high speed and shock load. This paper describes a different use of the machine for the determination of the wear with gear lubricants under conditions simulating high torque and low speed. The modifications to the machine and the procedure used are described in detail. Data were obtained with a straight mineral oil and 11 representative samples of commercial lubricants commonly used in automotive gears, when operating at 225°F and various constant loads. The loads covered were 90, 135, 180, and 225 pounds (scale reading). These data showed marked differences in the performance of the lubricants in the higher load range. The trends shown by these differences were in reasonable agreement with the known service performance of these lubricants. Other information given includes an indication of run-in wear, the change in surface roughness of the test cups with wear, and the effect of the original surface roughness on the rate of wear.
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490142
W. J. BACKOFF, N. D. WILLIAMS, K. BOLDT
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490143
R. S. Saddoris
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490144
T. R. MILTON
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490137
H. R. WOLF, J. L. McCLOUD
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490138
W. S. HOOCK
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490139
L. J. TEST, C. A. HALL
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490140
T. P. SANDS
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490150
WILMOT SANDHAM
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490151
W. E. THILL
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490149
H. W. FALL
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490147
FRANK A. GROOSS
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490146
A. T. COLWELL, A. L. POMEROY
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490148
T. M. FAHNESTOCK
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490158
F. L. MAGEE, K. B. WOLFE, S. J. PIPITONE, G. W. MOTHERWELL
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490157
R. F. GAGG, K. N. BUSH, A. T. COLWELL, R. P. KROON, W. C. HEARTH, W. P. CROSS
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490160
WILLIAM LITTLEWOOD, D. J. JORDAN, E. H. ATKIN, CARLOS WOOD, H. R. HARRIS
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490159
F. C. CRAWFORD, F. M. HOPKINS, A. M. PRIDE, H. L. HIBBARD, E. B. NEWILL
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490154
R. G. McELWEE, L. B. ROSSEAU, A. W. HERBENAR, O. E. CULLEN, C.F. JOSEPH, HAROLD BATES, E. H. STILWILL, E. D. WIARD
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490153
William Littlewood
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490156
D. W. RENTZEL, W. E. BEALL, G. W. HALDEMAN, W. W. DAVIES, L. S. KUTER
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490155
H. C. SMITH, C. A. BURKHALTER, C. L. ALTENBURGER, V. M. DARSEY, J. F. RANDALL, T. F. OLT, N. E. ROTHENTHALER

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