Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 163861 to 163890 of 170148
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
J. W. GREIG
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
A. J. Carter
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
J. P. WILSON
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
N. M. Hawkins, R. Lithoren
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
R. C. HENSHAW, L. WALLERSTEIN, S. J. ZAND
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
JACK H. GILL, R.S. FRANK
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
M.G. BEARD, DAVE NORTH
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
J. T. Dyment
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
A. HOWARD HASBROOK
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
D.R. deBoisblanc
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
C.L. Fleming, B.W. Geddes, N.V. Hakala, C.A. Weisel
ALTHOUGH oils containing additives to raise the V.I. to 120-125 have been used for years, there has been some question as to the effect of the improvers on the performance characteristics of the oils. Tests run by the authors under actual service conditions indicate, however, that these high V.I. motor oils do offer the readiest means of combining good low-temperature starting characteristics with low oil consumption properties in a single crankcase lubricant.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
G. Mervin Ault, G. C. Deutsch
RESULTS of a research program designed to find improved materials for jet engine blades is presented here. These blades are subjected to a very severe combination of conditions, including high temperatures and stresses. The search for materials capable of meeting these conditions has led from high-temperature alloys to ceramics, and from ceramics to ceramals-combinations of ceramics and metals that, it is hoped, can be made to combine the advantages of both materials. Although the goal of a material that can stand a temperature of 3500 F under the conditions of operation has not yet been reached, substantial improvements have been made in prolonging life at current temperatures and for increasing peak cycle temperatures.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
Major M.G. Bekker
WARTIME emergency showed the inadequacy of existing off-the-road transport, and hurriedly organized research did not solve any of the basic problems. Postwar research has explained many fundamental ideas, such as that of ground pressure, and has stressed the importance of the concept of two-dimensional soil loading imposed by a vehicle. The principles of a quantitative relationship between the performance of a track and a wheel were formulated, and the soil properties responsible for vehicle performance have been defined. The effect of grouser action and tire tread was clarified, and new laboratory methods of working by means of scale models were developed. The limitations of present design trends were examined, and the necessity for new concepts has been emphasized. Only very slow progress toward this goal is anticipated unless active support for the necessary research program is given by interested agencies.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
Fred J. Walls
THE problems involved in selecting the proper material for brake drums are discussed here from the standpoints of physics and metallurgy. The author shows that, for the present, at least, high-total-carbon cast irons fulfill the requirements of the braking surface to a greater extent than any alloy discovered so far.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
F.C. Mock, D.R. Ganger
ACHIEVEMENT of a high degree of atomization and evenness of distribution - particularly at low fuel rates-are major needs in the field of gas turbine powerplant fuel spray nozzles. Since the swirl type of nozzle is inadequate to meet these needs, according to the authors, it is being abandoned in favor of duplex nozzles, which have the advantage of holding up the energy of atomization at low deliveries. The duplex nozzle is also easy to manufacture and has a wide available range of fuel flows, compared with the simplex nozzle.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
Norman Hoertz, R. Max Rogers
THIS review of valve designs covers materials, hard facing, sodium filling, and valve rotating devices, with the thought of giving the operator an insight into the qualities and limitations of their use. Problems related to seats, springs, guides, and tappet clearances, as they are related to valve performance and problems of sticking and burning, are also covered briefly.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
Martin A. Elliott, Rogers F. Davis
THE relation between fuel/air ratio and the products of incomplete combustion is discussed here, as well as the probable origin of these products. The authors observed a relation between concentration of aldehydes and the odorous and irritating character of diesel exhaust gas. This relation suggested to them that removal of aldehydes should reduce odor and irritation of the exhaust gases. Tests with water as a scrubbing medium showed that aldehydes cannot be removed completely by such a system. However, aqueous sodium sulfite solutions inhibited by the addition of hydroquinone to prevent oxidation of the sulfite remove substantially all of the aldehydes and effect significant reductions in odor and irritation for extended periods of time. The paper discusses also the application of data on exhaust-gas composition to the determination of operating and performance data on diesel engines.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
R.S. Plexico, R.E. Kaufman
THE Chevrolet automatic transmission, the events leading to the selection of the torque converter type of drive, and the characteristics secured with this drive in combination with a high-output engine and low-ratio axle are described here. Of special interest is the construction of the converter members from accurately formed steel stampings, which had not previously been done in high production, but which was considered the most practical method for large production.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
H. E. Churchill
THE principles of design and the operating characteristics of the Studebaker automatic transmission are presented here. The basic transmission design consists of the following major elements: 1. A single-stage, three-element torque converter completely fabricated from stampings. 2. Two epicyclic single-planet helical gear sets. 3. Two gear-type oil pumps. 4. One multiple-disc clutch. 5. One single-plate disc clutch submerged in oil for direct drive. 6. Three band-type clutches with suitable servo mechanisms. 7. Three sprag-type freewheel units. 8. One valve block assembly. 9. One centrifugal mechanical governor. Tests results and performance characteristics for the transmission are discussed briefly.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
BERNARD RUBIN, EDWARD M. GLASS
SYNTHETIC lubricants-materials that are wholly or largely nonpetroleum - are being looked at with favor by the Air Force, the authors indicate, because of limitations in the performance of petroleum lubricants at extremely high and extremely low temperatures. The types of materials investigated as synthetic lubricants included: dibasic acid ester, polyalkylene glycols, organic silicon compounds, halogenated hydrocarbon, and inorganic radical-organic base ester.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
C. F. Taylor, E. S. Taylor, J. C. Livengood, W. A. Russell, W. A. Leary
THE autoignition characteristics of several fuels under various conditions of mixture strength, compression ratio, and temperature have been studied by means of a rapid-compression machine. The behaviors of a knock inhibitor, tetraethyl lead, and a knock inducer, ethyl nitrite, have also been studied. Simultaneous records of pressure, volume, and the inflammation have been obtained. These records show the diverse aspects of the autoignition phenomenon and indicate, among other things, according to the authors, that a comparison of the detonating tendencies of fuels must include not only a consideration of the length of the delay period but also an evaluation of the rate of pressure rise during autoignition. Physical interpretations of the data are presented but chemical interpretations have been avoided. The work was exploratory in nature. The authors hope that the results will stimulate activity in this important branch of combustion research.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
JOHN R. ERWIN, JAMES C. EMERY
THE inadequacy of existing cascade data to satisfy 2-dimensional flow criteria is discussed in this paper. It presents the results of an investigation to determine the influence of aspect ratio, boundary-layer control by means of slots and porous surfaces, Reynold’s number, and tunnel end-wall condition upon the performance of airfoils in cascades. A representative compressor blade section, the 65-(12) 10 airfoil, was tested in low-speed cascades of aspect ratios of one, two, and four with solid and with porous side walls. The authors report that 2-dimensional flow was established in porous-wall cascades of each of the three aspect ratios tested; the flow was not 2-dimensional in any of the solid-wall cascades.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
J.G. OETZEL
AFTER making an extensive examination of many brake lining materials, Mr. Oetzel comes to the conclusion that no short test can show adequately the characteristics of a piece of lining. It seems that no one value of coefficient can be used to represent a piece of lining, according to the author, because the coefficient varies so widely with temperature and pressure and with the degree of service curing. He says further that there seems to be no way to reduce the characteristics of a lining material to some simple “index number”; that the best that can be said is that, when correlated with road tests, characteristics determined from samples form a useful basis of judgment.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
H.J. WOOD, F. DALLENBACH
PROPOSED in this paper, for which its authors are receiving the Wright Brothers Medal for 1949, is an all-pneumatic system to provide the auxiliary power required by turbine-propelled multiengine aircraft. Compressed air to drive various auxiliary power consumers is obtained by extraction from the compressors of the main propulsion turbines and from a special form of auxiliary gas turbine. This turbine is effective primarily when the main engines are inoperative, and it may be used to start the latter. By proper use of air extracted from the main engines, fuel consumption chargeable to auxiliary power appears, according to the authors, to be as low as for any competitive system. Furthermore, the amount of air extracted is shown to be well within generally accepted limits.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
T. A. BOYD
IN this paper, which was presented by Mr. Boyd when he received the Horning Memorial Award, the author outlines the story of the long search for a suitable antiknock compound that began in 1916 and attained success with the discovery of the effectiveness of tetraethyl lead. Mr. Boyd then goes on to relate how the study of fuels was continued, with the investigation of such phases as the structure of hydrocarbons, evaluation of the benefits of high compression, and combustion studies. Finally, he urges that research on fuels and engines be continued without abatement, for, he says, the development of more efficient fuels and engines would result in huge economic gains and in the conservation of our petroleum resources just as it has done in the past.
Technical Paper
1950-01-01
E. L. CLINE
TO do its job of generating adequate and reliable horsepower efficiently, the maintenance department must accomplish the following objectives: 1. Keep material and labor costs down. 2. Make correct repair the first time. 3. Place on the road only vehicles that are fit. The author shows how service chassis and engine dynamometers are helping many maintenance departments to attain these goals. He also gives specific suggestions for operators planning to install such equipment. He points out pitfalls to be avoided, if the most efficient use of this machinery is to be attained.

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: