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Viewing 163861 to 163890 of 163964
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
RALPH H. ROSENBERG
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
Charles B. Whittelsey
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
CHESTER S. RICKER
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
C. ROY WATSON
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
C. F. Kettering
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
FRANK W. TRABOLD
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
ETHELBERT FAVARY
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
F. E. MOSKOVICS
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
J. W. FITZGERALD
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
E. J. STODDARD
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
GEORGE S. CROSS
Technical Paper
1912-01-01
J. B. HULL
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
H. N. ANDERSON
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
E. K. ROWLAND
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
CHARLES E. DURYEA
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
JOHN C. SPENCE
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
GEORGE N. JEPPSON
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
Henry Hess
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
LOGAN WALLER PAGE
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
RADCLYFFE FURNESS
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
JOSEPH SCHAEFFERS
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
WILLIAM P. KENNEDY
Perplex and difficult of solution are many of the new administrative problems which appear in the marketing of commercial cars. This is particularly true on account of the transition taking place in the industry, from the manufacture of pleasure cars to the production and application of the commercial type to economic service, and administrations are suddenly confronted with realization of the necessity for entirely different methods of operation, if not a completely different fabric of organization. The characteristics of the commercial line are in radical contrast with the pleasure car business, the inception and purpose of the one being so different from the other as to render obsolete many of the formulated practices heretofore in vogue, conspicuous among which is a too complete reliance upon the individualistic function performed by the salesman. It is not the purpose of this paper to advance anything in the nature of destructive policy, but rather to aid administration by the constructive influence of engineering talent in developing a qualified organization, operated by predetermined methods, and supervised by continuous analytical scrutiny to the end that the administration may assume complete responsibility and precise control of every factor contributing to the efficiency of the sales department.
Technical Paper
1911-01-01
ARNOLD C. KOENIG
Viewing 163861 to 163890 of 163964

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