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Viewing 163861 to 163890 of 181985
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS3659
This specification covers virgin, unfilled polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in the form of extruded rods, tubes, and profiles.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS4116B
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of bars, rods, and wire. These products have been used typically for parts requiring moderate ductility, formability, and response to precipitation heat treatment, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS4127C
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of die forgings, hand forgings, forged rings, rolled rings, and stock for forgings and rings.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS2422A
This specification covers the engineering requirements for electrodeposition of gold and the properties of the deposit.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS4080F
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of drawn seamless tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts, such as conduits and low-pressure fluid lines, where moderate strength, ductility, and good weldability are required, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS3662
This specification covers one grade of polytetrafluoroethylene resin in the form of film. Primarily for gaskets and other parts for use up to 260 degrees C (500 degrees F) requiring good performance in mechanical, electrical, or chemical service.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS5640G
This specification covers three types of a free-machining, corrosion-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, and forging stock.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS5647B
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS3656A
This specification covers a virgin, unfilled polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in the form of extruded and sintered rods, tubes, and profiles.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS5731B
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or heading. These products have been used typically for parts, such as flanges, cases, and fasteners, requiring moderate strength up to 1300 degrees F (704 degrees C) and oxidation resistance up to 1500 degrees F (816 degrees C), particularly those which are formed or welded and then heat treated to develop required properties, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS5759C
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant cobalt alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or heading. These products have been used typically for parts requiring high strength up to 1500 °F (816 °C) and oxidation resistance up to 2000 °F (1093 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS2301C
This specification covers steel cleanliness requirements inch/pound units for aircraft-quality ferro-magnetic steels, other than hardenable corrosion-resistant steels, by magnetic particle inspection methods.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS2350F
To establish the issue of specifications, standards, and recommended practices published by standardizing agencies other than divisions and committees of the Aerospace Council of SAE approved for use in determining conformance to requirements of Aerospace Material Specifications (AMS) and other specifications in which this specification is referenced.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS2469B
This specification establishes the requirements for a hard anodic coating on aluminum and aluminum alloys.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS3658
This specification covers virgin, unfilled polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in the form of extruded rods, tubes, and profiles.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS5659A
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, flash welded rings, extrusions, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or extruding. These products have been used typically for parts requiring corrosion resistance and high strength up to 600 °F (316 °C) with good ductility and strength in the transverse direction in large section sizes, but usage is not limited to such applications. Certain design and processing procedures may cause these products to become susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking; ARP1110 recommends practices to minimize such conditions.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS4117B
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of rolled or cold-finished bars, rods, and wire and of flash welded rings and stock for flash welded rings. These products have been used typically for parts requiring moderate strength where limited formability is acceptable, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1966-03-01
Standard
AMS5737C
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, and stock for forging or heading. These products have been used typically for parts, such as turbine rotors, shafts, blades, vanes, dowels, flanges, and fittings, requiring moderate strength up to 1300 degrees F (704 degrees C) and oxidation resistance up to 1500 degrees F (816 degrees C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660326
J. J. Kenna, H. R. Cook
Methods and equipment have been developed to sculpture aluminum honeycomb core. Three special honeycomb mills, hand-step cutting equipment, and a composite tooling material are being utilized to contour machine aluminum honeycomb on a production basis.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660323
JOHN MORRIS
During the course of the C-5A Heavy Logistics Transport Studies, a new level of engine technology emerged. The object of this paper is to demonstrate what impact engines designed to that technology level would have on the commercial subsonic transport. Three cases have been considered: (1) installing new engines on an existing airframe, (2) increasing fuselage size and passenger capacity of an existing aircraft as well as fitting new engines, and (3) using a completely new aircraft with new engines.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660324
L. R. Glassburner
The multiplicity of advancements in the aerospace sciences and manufacturing technologies have brought both promises and problems. Successful integration of this knowledge is clearly reflected in the product profit. The successful development and introduction of new products is not a matter of “luck” but rather enlightened, comprehensive, step-by-step planning accomplished in cooperation with the product designer early in the product phase. The promise of continued acceleration of new scientific knowledge and development, of new technologies will require manufacturing engineers with vision, courage, the ability to plan, and the desire to learn.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660333
Robert H. Shatz, Thomas R. Wheaton
The turbine motor train designed by United Aircraft Corp. represents a systems approach to high-speed rail service, and incorporates many unique features that will permit operation at speeds up to 160 mph on existing roadbeds with significant savings in trip time and maintenance costs. Special emphasis is given the suspension system used on the UAC turbine powered train. The advantages of this system are that it banks the car body proportional to the lateral force, allowing higher speeds on curves with comfort equal to or greater than is now encountered. Also, intermediate axles are guided to eliminate the oscillations or truck hunting encountered in conventional trucks.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660335
Robert L. Cummings
Helicopters capable of vertical flight have opened a new market for air transportation. They offer a means of rapid access to city centers avoiding the congestion and wasted time of surface travel. The growing success of the high frequency common carrier operations of New York Airways, conducted between La Guardia Field, the Wall Street Heliport, Newark Airport and Kennedy International Airport, and between Kennedy International Airport and the Pan Am Building Heliport in mid-Manhattan, have set an example of service for densely populated areas everywhere.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660327
Joseph S. Newman, Arthur E. Nelsen
A description of the design and fabrication cost relationships of formed titanium sheet structures is given. Emphasis is placed on the potential advantages of implementing an advanced hot forming concept and related equipment. The use of this concept and/or equipment will insure quality products at minimum cost by extending current design and fabrication limitations and reducing the number of tools, parts, assembly operations, and assembly fit-up time normally required for structural assembly.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660332
R. H. Miller
The potentials of short haul air transportation systems are projected to the mid-1970 and 1980 periods. The costs and operational characteristics of these systems are sensitive to the size and nature of the travel market which, at the present time, is not well defined. However, indications are that air transportation could hold the key to the solution of the problems of short haul travel in heavily populated areas.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660317
Robert B. Meyersburg
Realistic assessment of the role of V/STOL air transportation in the 1970’s is important to government transportation policies being formulated. Studies of a system, including the vehicle, airport, air traffic, and navigation facilities, were conducted in a specific market -- the California Corridor. Four VTOL aircraft representing various concepts were designed to a common set of requirements. These aircraft, one STOL, a conventional jet aircraft, and a conventional helicopter, were operated in a simulated airline network. Costs and revenues were compared to those of conventional jet aircraft operating on the same airline network. Ground transportation systems were assessed, including the automobile which is a formidable opponent on shorter routes. However, the STOL/VTOL systems by virtue of their convenience and overall speed, capture some traffic from other transportation means and generate new customer markets.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660318
N. W. Tillinghast, G. B. Pearson
This paper presents a discussion of some of the key considerations associated with the use of V/STOL transport aircraft for intercity passenger movement. Travel demand is related to V/STOL aircraft operations insofar as it influences the optimum terminal site location. Cost-benefit comparisons are presented from the viewpoints of: aircraft operations, airport construction, and passenger fares. The impact of V/STOL technology on existing equipment and facilities, traffic servicing standards, and flight operations is assessed. The study reports that V/STOL aircraft will be a desirable transit mode for the regional intercity passenger market expected to become dominant during the next decades.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660316
George D. Ray
To have good economy, aircraft should be large enough that the variation of payload as a percentage of gross weight is not affected greatly by a small change in gross weight. Particular attention for weight saving should be directed towards fixed items of an airplane’s weight that are dictated by the mission. To be economical, a VTOL airplane can be expected to have a higher gross weight than a STOL or CTOL. VTOL transports permit major reductions in total time for accomplishing a mission. The VTOL system will be cheaper than STOL or CTOL for short mission accomplishment times. It is necessary to evaluate total savings resulting for shorter mission accomplishment times, but this is difficult because the ability to do things faster permits doing more things in a different manner.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660321
F. Searls, C. Y. Joe
The purpose of this paper is to explore one part of the 1972 commercial air transport picture. New jet engine and aircraft technology will be available which offers substantial advantages in operating economics. A major portion of the improvement will come by way of the engine redesigns. Higher bypass ratios, higher turbine inlet temperatures, and substantially advanced structural concepts point in the direction of lower direct operating costs. An analysis is made using these “new technology” engines on older fleets of large jet transports. Results show that the domestic operators have little to gain. Longer range, intercontinental operators may find the engine conversion attractive for some route segments where range is critical. Engine maintenance costs, among other costs, associated with reengining are considered. Finally, using these results, an estimate is made of an airplane size which will maximize the cost-reduction potential of the engines.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660319
George Litchford, John E. Gallagher
The inauguration of true city center schedules coupled with the tremendous response from the traveling public and the continuing increase in passenger seat mile revenues for over a decade of VTOL scheduled air carrier service is evidence of the public need and confirmation of a continuing expansion of operations. Future research and development will be directed at reducing operating costs and improving schedule regularity on trip lengths that vary from the very short inter-airport to city distances to upwards of a hundred miles. The airframe manufacturers are already building helicopters large enough to carry 45 to 65 passengers and if adequate progress can be made in reducing direct operating costs (and thereby lowering seat mile costs), helicopters will become a common mode of air transportation in the very short-haul market. One significant advantage of VTOL air transportation is the flexibility of service patterns that can be provided.

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