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Viewing 163861 to 163890 of 176165
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620179
Robert De Liban
The development of the Guide-O-Matic system meets the relatively new concept of using driverless trains in the field of material handling and warehousing. Basically, Guide-O-Matic equipment is either a magnetic type following wiring in the floor or an optical type following a taped line on the floor. The magnetic system provides high reliability and is more easily adapted to steering, course switching, stopping, and programming -- technical aspects of these phases are discussed. Multiple tractor systems can also be used by setting up an automatic traffic control system. Safety features and future applications of the automatic driverless trains are highlighted.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620020
George Opdyke
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620180
Walter M. Shaffer
This paper covers the development and features of a unique narrow aisle gas fork lift truck. It shows how three individually selective types of hydraulic circuits are utilized for a hydrostatic drive to power a rotatable front end - load assembly in a vehicle which is a new approach to narrow aisle stacking. The result is a lift truck which uses narrow aisles for storing material and retains the speed, utility, and endurance of conventional equipment.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620019
J. D. Savage
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620165
B. C. Harris
To fill the need for a compact, highly maneuverable motor tractor the White Motor Co. developed the Model 1500 from experience in England with small, three wheel tractors, and a program in which several designs were considered. The Model 1500 has a 200 hp engine, (a diesel version is available,) 74-in. wheelbase, and tilt cab.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620006
R. W. Haushalter, W. Cornelius, D. L. Stivender
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620005
K. D. Mills, H. J. Korp, P. R. Lepisto, H. C. McKee
This paper presents the results of an investigation of the normal sources of hydrocarbon emissions of passenger cars. The sources were considered to consist of the crankcase ventilation and exhaust systems, the carburetor, and the fuel tank vent. Many studies involving the emissions from several of these sources have been conducted and reported; however, it is believed that this is the first study designed to develop emission data from all the sources of a single group of passenger cars. Although only five vehicles were used, several mechanical conditions and engine and power train configurations were examined. The largest single source of hydrocarbon emissions was found to be the exhaust, followed by the road draft tube. Relatively minor emissions were measured as a result of fuel evaporation from the carburetor and fuel tank during periods of operation and hot soak.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620167
Earl E. Melby
This paper discusses various aspects of the transport refrigeration industry. A general discussion of the types of vehicles used is followed by an evaluation of several refrigeration systems, namely, vapor, absorption, dry ice or liquified carbon dioxide, water ice, liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide, eutectic or hold-over plate, and the thermoelectric approach. Equipment design is also discussed in detail.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620168
J. H. Budd
A review of the history and problems of 2-cycle engine lubrication is presented, together with the results of tests comparing ash bearing oils and ashless oils, premium and regular grade gasoline, various size engines, and various combinations of these. Results measures were spark plug failure, combustion chamber deposits, piston ring sticking, piston varnish, exhaust port plugging, cylinder wear, and crankcase deposits. Additives are needed to overcome problems of bore wear on light weight air cooled 2-cycle gasoline engines.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620007
H. C. Maskey, F. X. Marsh
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620010
Hendrie J. Grant, Neil A. Newman
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620169
L. A. McReynolds, G. E. Holman
The demand for a specially formulated lubricating oil for 2 cycle engines continues to grow. As the rise in output per unit and the number of different engine models and designs continue to increase, lubrication problems steadily rise. This paper presents engine test results on a number of base stock and detergent additive combinations. Several production model 2 cycle engines ranging in size from 3–80 hp were used. The results of these tests indicate the complexity of the problem of satisfying the lubricant requirements of all the various engine models and designs with a single lubricant product.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620009
John C. Bellamy
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620012
N. R. Brainard, W. G. Trabold, F. C. Becker
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620171
John T. Rausch
Automobile manufacturers are facing the problem of crankcase emission control in the 1963 model year. Testing has indicated that blowby gases consisting of high comcentrations of hydrocarbons are one of the primary causes of smog and air pollution. A description of three systems under consideration — positive crankcase ventilation, tube type - valveless, and dual action ventilation — is presented in this paper. The basic function is to recycle the blowby gases back into the conbustion chamber for burning, either through the intake manifold, the air cleaner, or both. Test results indicate recycling of blowby gases is advantageous in that it results in cleaner engines as well as eliminating to a large degree hydrocarbon emission.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620172
Kenneth A. Hoffman
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620011
W. N. Engel, R. L. Cochran, M. M. Delao
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620158
Horace K. Church
The past three decades have witnessed new types of excavation machinery and technological improvements in existing machinery. Through use of bigger, heavier, and more powerful equipment, excavators of 1962 perform work at a direct job unit cost no higher than their 1930 counterparts. Major developments have come about principally due to improved engines, tires, and alloy steels. A review of the capabilities of present day power shovels, crawler tractors, dump trucks, graders, and road builders is included. In the future this industry will see automation whereby the operation of fleets of earth movers will be handled from remote control centers.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620157
Earl M. Jorgensen
Natural gas fueled internal combustion engines are replacing conventional electric motor drive as prime movers for deep well irrigation pumping. This strictly economic application required some narrow specifications. An application of a torque sensing device to measure engine output in horsepower produced information of great interest to APS and the industry. Consideration is being given to some new oil developments for this service, and some interesting appurtenance applications have been made.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620160
Arnold E. Andersen
The Seattle Monorail was built to demonstrate its potential as a rapid mass transportation media. Installed in conjunction with the World’s Fair, the route extends from the fairgrounds to the central business district. Constructed in one of the city’s main downtown streets, the work progressed while maintaining nearly normal traffic flow. Structural and construction features of the supporting units are described. Data and information on the rolling stock is included. The completed system represents a new approach to high volume passenger movement in urban areas.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620159
G. U. Brumbaugh
Current developments in lightweight trucks and trailers for hauling bulk materials and fill over public highways, and the various configurations of truck and trailer combinations are discussed, pointing out their relative advantages and disadvantages. New components for use in trucks to secure minimum weight and maximum performance are considered, including problems incident to their use. Trucks have been reduced in weight, without sacrificing performance or durability over the years, and this trend will certainly continue using materials and components not currently available.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620162
Stoney M. Stubbs
Since the end of World War II there has been substantial progress in the development and marketing of frozen food products, and the equipment and facilities to transport, store, and distribute them. However, greater coordination is needed between trailer manufacturers and manufacturers of refrigeration units to provide equipment that will perform according to required standards, be easy and economical to maintain, and be reliable.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620001
A. H. Bell, R. A. Brauburger
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620161
Robert F. McKee
Growth of the frozen food industry fostered development of mechanically refrigerated rail cars to replace ice bunker refrigerator cars. These cars are now capable of handling any perishable commodity from −10 F to + 70 F. Successful development of controlled temperature cars was made possible by the diesel engine and its simplicity, ruggedness, sible by the diesel engine and its simplicity, ruggedness, economy, and safe type of fuel. Truck refrigeration first developed around gasoline or propane power, but light weight diesel engines are now being used. This permitted railroad handling of refrigerated trailers in piggyback service. Future development of both rail and highway refrigeration systems will depend upon the ability to increase dependability of components to equal the diesel engine itself; otherwise increasing costs of operation will require departure to other forms of refrigeration.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620002
F. K. POLING
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620164
C. R. BOLL
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620163
H. S. Ford, F. W. Sinks
In the new “N” models of the 71 series basic changes were made in the injection system, combustion chamber, compression rings, and oil control. A differential needle valve replaces the crown valve in the injection system and provides improved combustion. Use of higher compression ratio piston and narrow compression rings have added additional flexibility to the series 71 engine. These developments resulted in the N models achieving greater fuel economy, improved oil control, practically clear exhaust, and improved light load and idle compression.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620003
PAUL J. KING
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620004
Robert Felts

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