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Viewing 164041 to 164070 of 174078
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580105
A. P. McCLOUD, J. N. BARKER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580101
FRED A. WILCOX
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580100
E. J. OSOLS
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580099
ROBERT C. TRUAX
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580115
DAVID L. COHOE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580114
S. E. SHERLOCK
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580112
T. H. RANDALL, R. E. ANDRUS, R. S. FEIN, H. D. KLUGE
Summary Studies of the low temperature wear phenomenon in a laboratory gasoline engine are presented. The relationships between wear, jacket temperature and oil quality are amplified. SO2 formed by combustion of the sulfur in the fuel and halogen acids from excess TEL scavenger are the principal causes of corrosive wear. The dependence of wear on available alkalinity and surface protection characteristics of a wide variety of lubricant additives is demonstrated. It is shown that some additives provide only alkalinity, others only surface protection and some both. The effectiveness of surface protection depends on the type of acid molecule encountered. Surface protecting barriers exclude the larger SO2 and bromine molecules more readily than the smaller chlorine molecule. The relative importance of alkalinity and surface protection characteristics of lubricants under extended service is discussed.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580113
C. F. SCHWARZ, H. T. CLINE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580111
P. A. Bennett
This paper presents the results of an interference microscope study of the action of oil additives on metal surfaces in sliding contact and indicates that valuable information can be obtained from a study of the worn surface. It is shown that the operation of engine cams and valve lifters on oils containing zinc dithiophosphate additives can result in an increase in the small-scale roughness of the lifter-foot surface over that obtained by operation of the same parts on oils which do not contain the additive. In addition, the development of this surface roughness is also influenced by operating time, stability and concentration of the additive, and composition of the contacting surfaces. Although the mechanism involved is far from being completely understood, the increase in small-scale roughness is believed to result from a reaction of additive decomposition products and the surface.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580110
C. S. SCANLEY, READ LARSON
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580108
J. L. LAUER, P. J. FRIEL, R. D. MILLER
To learn about ways of controlling spark plug fouling, research was done in three areas: (1) chemical and physical properties of spark plug deposits, (b) development of an instrument to measure a basic physical property, viz. insulator leakage resistance, as a criterion of spark plug fouling, and (c) engine tests simulating car road performance and aiding the other studies. Ease of deposit fusibility was found to correlate with low resistance and a high degree of fouling. Electron microscopic examination showed that fusibility varied with the area of the ceramic insulator on which the deposit was laid and with the grain structure in a given area. Lead halides are most undesirable in this respect. Spark plugs whose leakage resistances were less than one megohm at normal engine operating temperatures were generally fouled. The corresponding resistances of new plugs were usually around 1000 megohms.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580109
S. B. TWISS, E. H. LOESER, R. C. WIQUIST
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580122
R. A. McFarland, R. G. Domey
A STUDY has revealed that few truck cabs are designed with the comfort of the driver in mind. All too often, cabs were found to be far below the minimum standard in dimension, equipment, ease of operation, adjustability, and visibility. This situation interferes with the efficiency of the driver, causing at various times inconvenience and discomfort which eventually has an effect on the safety of operation. This paper reports the findings of this study and suggests criteria for a more efficient and comfortable cab. The study was undertaken at the Harvard School of Public Health.*
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580123
D. J. ROSSELLE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580121
K. B. VALENTINE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580120
FREDERICK P. GLAZIER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580119
FOREST McFARLAND
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580118
H. S. CHANDLER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580116
ALAN P. ANDERSON
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580087
REX A. TERRY
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580088
B. C. HARRIS
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580090
L.A. ZWICKER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580089
EARL R. KLINGE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580084
J. D. DUDLEY
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580086
J. R. HAMMOND
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580158
WALTER PRINCE
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580085
F.T. COX
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580159
ROBERT E. SONNEKSON

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