Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 164041 to 164070 of 175133
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600217
ROBERT J. MOFFAT
An apparatus for testing bare wire and complex thermocouple probes is described which is capable of producing a gas stream which is stable and uniform over a wide range of conditions. The gas temperature is uniform within ± 1°F and stable with time to within ± .25°F at 1600°F across a 1 × 2 in. flow area. The means of removing the fluctuations and gradients are discussed. Various environmental conditions may be imposed in the test section to allow evaluation of radiation error, conduction error or response rate. Instrumentation useful in the study of thermocouple behavior is discussed.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600219
J. D. MEADOR
The performance characteristics of gas sampling thermocouples used in the Allison Model 501 engine are discussed. Various environmental factors affecting performance of the thermocouple are analyzed and criteria established for the testing of such components. Description of a new high-temperature flowing gas thermocouple test rig and general performance data of the equipment is presented. Test procedures and analysis of calibration data are discussed. Fourteen figures are presented to illustrate the characteristics of the thermocouple and features of the test equipment.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600218
F. R. CALDWELL, L. O. OLSEN, P. D. FREEZE
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600221
Ellis A. Johnson
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600220
MARVIN D. SCADRON
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600222
TED FINKELSTEIN
SUMMARY Schmidt's classical thermodynamic analysis of closed, regenerative gas cycles assumed isothermal phases, which implies infinite heat transfer through cylinder walls on zero speed. The more general case of limited heat transfer coefficient and variable exposed surface area for the cylinder is treated in this paper and expressions for the cyclic pressure and temperature variations of the working fluid are derived. These are based on a pair of simultaneous first-order differential equations which do not have closed solutions, so that stepwise numerical integration methods must be used. A complete heat balance is obtained so that actual efficiencies or coefficients of performance can be calculated instead of assuming them to be equal to the ideal values of a Carnot cycle, as was general practice up to now.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600225
E. C. KINKER, J. L. TERRY
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600224
B. I. RAYSOR, H. R. BOLTON
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600223
TED FINKELSTEIN
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600226
J. C. LAEGELER
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600227
W. J. YOUDEN
This is a nontechnical account of some of the statistical design techniques appropriate for complex studies that have been developed in the last fifteen years. It has been prepared for the national meeting of the Society of Automotive Engineers in Detroit on January 11, 1960. The Society preprints the papers for the meeting. Subsequently the paper is either published in full in the Society's Annual Transactions or a detailed abstract in the monthly Journal.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600229
John W. Clark, Robert E. Harvie, Edward L. Nash
ABSTRACT
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600228
PAUL IRICK
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600230
M. J. BOEGEL, J. F. WAGNER
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600231
H. MARK
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600232
W. S. MOUNT
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600234
D. C. BARDY
The growth of the two-cycle market has been steady and rapid during rhe last 12 years. This is illustrated with data based on outboard motor sales. Because the lubricant for these engines is mixed with the fuel and a large portion is burned in the combustion chamber, certain operating difficulties are often encountered. Chemical additives offer a means of reducing or eliminating these difficulties. These additives should not be classified into categories, such as ash-containing additives and ashless additives, in an effort to define performance. A wide range in performance has been observed within both groups of additives. Data indicate that the chemical structure of the organic portion of these additives is of more significance than the metallic elements from which the additives are made. Various base stocks have been studied to determine their effect on two-cycle performance and their response to additive treatment.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600235
HAROLD HOEKSTRA
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600236
R. F. JENSON
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600237
R. I. RICE
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600238
C. V. CROCKETT
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600240
J. T. OSTERMAN
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600241
JOHN M. STEPHENSON
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600185
E. W. McMANNIS
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600183
C. V. CROCKETT
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600181
OLOF GUSTAFSSON, And, ULRICH RIMROTT

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: