Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 164041 to 164070 of 170058
Standard
1949-02-01
This specification covers a copper-zinc alloy (brass) in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. These products have been used typically for formed and drawn parts, but usage is not limited to such applications.
Standard
1949-02-01
This Aeronautical Standard covers two (2) basic types of instruments as follows: Type I - Range 35,000 feet. Barometric Pressure. Scale range at least 28.1 - 30.99 inches of mercury (946-1049 millibars). May include markers working in conjunction with the Barometric Pressure Scale to indicate pressure altitude. Type II - Range 50,000 feet. Barometric Pressure. Scale range at least 28.1 - 30.99 inches of mercury (946-1049 millibars). May include markers working in conjunction with the Barometric Pressure Scale to indicate pressure altitude.
Standard
1949-02-01
This specification covers a nitrile (NBR) rubber in the form of sheet, strip, tubing, extrusions, and molded shapes. These products have been used typically for parts, such as gaskets, diaphragms, bushings, grommets, and sleeves, requiring resistance to aromatic and aliphatic fuels when continuously or alternately exposed to both, but usage is not limited to such applications.
Standard
1949-02-01
This specification covers a nitrile (NBR) rubber in the form of sheet, strip, tubing, extrusions, and molded shapes. Primarily for parts, such as gaskets, diaphragms, bushings, grommets, and sleeves, requiring resistance to aromatic and aliphatic fuels when continuously or alternately exposed to both.
Standard
1949-02-01
The recommendations of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) for aircraft compartment automatic temperature control systems are primarily intended to be applicable to occupied or unoccupied compartments of civil and military aircraft.
Magazine
1949-01-01
Standard
1949-01-01
Parts, such as bolts, turbine wheels, discs, buckets, and blades, for high strength and oxidation resistance up to 1500 F when suitably heat treated.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
F. L. LaQUE, E. J. HERGENROETHER
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
J. W. LANE, D. S. CHATFIELD
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
F. J. WIEGAND, M. R. ROWE
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
W. E. HILL
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
WILLARD H. FARR, GEORGE E. COXON
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
J. G. VINCENT, FOREST McFARLAND
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
MERRILL C. HORINE
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
GERALD WENDT
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
John L. Collyer
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
H. Richard O'Hara
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
Valentine Gephart
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
Emmett W. Bond
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
Robert P. Ernest
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
L. F. SHOEMAKER
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
T. J. BAKER
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
A. J. VOLZ, S. M. SMITH, M. R. BALIS
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
HUGH M. HENNEBERRY, A. F. LIETZKE
SUMMARY Consideration of the requirements of a realistic power-plant evaluation for air transport operations leads to the conclusion that the criterion must include the effect of the velocity at which the transportation is accomplished and some of the operating costs. A method of evaluating power plants for transport operations based on total operating cost per ton-mile is presented. An equation is developed for the purpose of expressing the total operating cost per ton-mile with the costs appearing in the equation as constants of proportionality. Methods are outlined to aid in the application of this equation to actual power-plant-evaluation problems. An approximate method of determining the flight altitude that results in the best performance for each combination of range and velocity is presented in order to simplify the power-plant evaluation. An example is included to illustrate the use of the equations and the methods developed.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
R. R. TEMPLETON, M. P. CERVINO

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: