Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 164041 to 164070 of 182532
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670023
B. A. Pearson, J. L Thompson
A small-scale oxidation test for automatic transmission fluids has been developed. In the test air flow rates, temperature and catalytic activity can be closely controlled at desired levels. A test procedure for screening automatic transmission fluids is described. Data are presented illustrating the ability of the test to distinguish between different levels of oxidation resistance, the repeatability of the test, and the correlation achieved thus far with a presently used full-scale transmission oxidation test.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670027
Ted Rudy
A new method for detecting the shape of a piston ring has been developed. The method uses the magnitude of a surface wave ultrasonic echo to plot the quality of the contact between a piston ring and a gage bore on a polar graph. The testing method and the results are discussed for single-piece and multi-piece rings, and for various surface treatments utilized in automotive piston rings.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670028
Vern C. Vanderbilt, William Van Ostrand, Clarence L. Zimmer
This paper describes an automatic control safety monitoring and data logging system which uses a frequency modulation signal format. The theoretical aspects of FM signals are outlined and experimental data reported showing signal to noise ratios for vehicle recorded data. A new type of specialized digital computer and data logger is described and examples given of engine parameter computations.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670031
Robert R. Hydell
A working system of peak to valley surface roughness control has been developed and is in use on selected aerospace production hardware. The system, while similar to the Swedish H system, has additional flexibility for the design engineer. A test in which seven companies participated proved the compatibility of roughness values obtained.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670029
Richard R. Booy
Two experimental methods for determining scavenging efficiency of an operating two-stroke cycle spark ignition engine are discussed and compared. They are the gas sampling technique and the spark interruption technique. Necessary apparatus and instrumentation are described, as well as the method of operation.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670038
Adolf Egli
Occupant motion in a head-on collision is studied through classical solutions of a two-degree-of-freedom mathematical model simulating a colinear vehicle-occupant system. Stoppage of the elastically restrained occupant by general system tuning is demonstrated. Analysis of the system behavior over a range of initial vehicle speeds brings out the fundamental differences due to elastic and inelastic occupant restraint and due to changes of character of vehicle front end collapse. Consideration of practical application of the conclusions, generally, should be limited to systems with well-harnessed occupants.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670039
Donald P. Marquis
While the collision of cars is not an exact science, the 1967 General Motors energy absorbing steering column shows what can be done in one area to improve the finished product through the achievement of a sequence of design goals. It is felt that, based on tests of a great number of vehicles, the energy absorbing column will definitely improve the driver’s chances of survival in a significant range of head-on collision conditions.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670034
D. E. Martin, C. K. Kroell
An analytical study of right angle barrier crashes has been conducted to evaluate the influence of vehicle crush distance, occupant spacing, and interior crush stiffness on the severity of occupant-interior impact. Particular attention was directed to the influence of the vehicle deceleration-time history wave shape. The study includes an analysis of a simple-point occupant and a more complicated articulated dummy. The results of these analyses are in substantial agreement and indicate that the most important factors in reducing unrestrained occupant impact severity in conventional vehicles are occupant spacing, vehicle crush distance, and interior crush stiffness. Because of practical considerations and the multiplicity of crash conditions, it is concluded that the most direct way to reduce injury and death is through improved vehicle interior crush behavior.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670043
Elmer A. Herider, William F. Le Fevre
This is a two part paper on the considerations involved in truck seating design. The first part discusses physiological factors of seating comfort which are essentially static in comparison to requirements for vibration isolation discussed in the second part. Basically, a truck driver’s seat should be designed to furnish the most in driver seating comfort within bounds of reasonable cost. Improved safety is gained by reducing muscular and nervous tensions which, in turn, reduce physical fatigue. The ability of the chair to isolate the driver from vibrations influences riding comfort. While the proper chair design can isolate high frequency, low amplitude vibrations the lower frequency, high amplitude chassis pitch vibrations can best be controlled by proper vehicle suspension systems, thus providing optimum riding comfort.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670044
A. W. Moesta
Through continuing and realistic innovations in concept, design, and testing, mechanical spring seating in trucks has vastly improved in recent years. Development of modern truck seats begins with the original seat package layout derived from the cab package. Then the details covering seat frame design are worked out so that prototype models can be received by the truck manufacturer at least a year in adfance of model production in order to provide adequate test, development, ride, and refinement time. Numerous and comprehensive laboratory and road vehicle tests are conducted to insure that the best seat is made available for the intended truck, with comfortable seating for the occupant at an economical cost.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670040
Derwyn M. Severy, Harrison M. Brink, Jack D. Baird
This paper contains findings from the first series of comprehensive school bus collision experiments. Three full-scale collision experiments involving a school bus were conducted using research techniques and engineering methodology designed to provide realistic and objective findings relating to school bus passenger safety. The experiments conducted were: A head-on collision between two fully loaded, moderate-sized school buses, each traveling 30 mph; a stationary bus rear-ended by a passenger car traveling 60 mph; a stationary bus impacted on its right side by a passenger car traveling 60 mph. The following categories relating to passenger injury causation were studied: location and type of impact, structural integrity of vehicles, vehicle size, seat design, type of restraint or force moderator, type of safety glass, passenger size, standing versus seated passengers, passenger kinematics and interactions, forces sustained by passengers, and many related factors.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670042
William H. Charlesworth, William L. Brown
The characteristic wear of electroplated chromium on piston rings has changed over the past 15 years. The reasons for the change are discussed and a theory proposed for the wear mechanism. The theory is supported by engine test results, radioactive ring and cylinder studies, and metallographic exhibits.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670048
J. R. Hull
The material is an updating of a 1961 paper, “Rolling Element Bearings in Passenger Car Automatic Transmissions” by R. H. White (paper 359F). This “1967 Edition” has been changed only where necessary to reflect current theory and practice. Passenger car automatic transmissions have two major sections, a hydraulic torque converter and a planetary or epicyclic gear box. This paper will first discuss the radial bearings in the planet gears and then discuss the thrust bearings used in both the hydraulic converter and geared sections of the transmission.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670110
F. J. Wallace
A differential compound engine is described which indicates it to be a significant advance over other traction prime movers. Its engine rating, as confirmed by both theoretical and experimental analysis, represents an increase of approximately 150% over the corresponding naturally aspirated engine. Furthermore, the compound mode of operation implies feedback of surplus power to the output shaft and therefore overall efficiencies in excess of engine efficiency, at least over part of the load range. Values of 40% in the neighborhood of the design point can be expected, experimental work having demonstrated engine brake thermal efficiencies in excess of 42-43%. Additional advantages include rising torque characteristics with decreasing output shaft speed, the incorporation of effective engine braking, and response characteristics superior to those of a turbocharged engine.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670469
Leon Gross-Gronomski
In this paper experimental data for different diesel engine types are described. The influence of load and speed on piston temperature is discussed. The problem whether higher speeds or higher mean effective pressures are preferable for a given output and for its increase are studied with the aid of experimental curves. Dependence of relative piston temperature on fuel consumption is shown for various engines. The role of engine speed in this dependence was found to be complicated. Piston temperature factors were introduced for practical purposes.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670468
Mitsunobu Ogasawara, Hiroshi Sami
In this study, the burning rate, burning lifetime, and flight distance of a fuel droplet injected into the combustion chamber were formulated, taking into consideration the effects of high air temperature and pressure, and of droplet relative velocity. It was confirmed by the experiment conducted that these formulas are valid, at least for a droplet in the tip of a puff of spray. They should provide strong clues to the theoretical determination of the minimum cylinder diameter suitable for small-size, direct injection diesel engines.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670480
Harold G. Weber, Gary L. Borman
A detailed mathematical simulation of a single cylinder, open chamber, naturally aspirated diesel engine was used to predict changes in performance caused by changing various engine design parameters. The computations have in some cases, been used to obtain the parameter values which give optimum performance. Among the parameters studied are: bore-stroke ratio, valve timing, intake and exhaust valve size, heat release patterns, compression ratio, and atmospheric temperature and pressure. The results are discussed and evaluated in terms of the assumptions used in the calculations.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670007
N. A. Henein, Jay A. Bolt
The ignition delay in diesel combustion has been studied in a turbulent chamber engine. The criteria used to define the end of this period are the pressure rise and illumination due to combustion. The pressure rise delay is generally shorter and more reproducible than the illumination delay. The effect of the following factors on the ignition delay were studied: cylinder pressure, fuel/air ratio, fuel injection pressure, cooling water temperature, and engine speed. Data concerning the effect of cylinder pressure on the pressure rise delay period, at constant air temperature, were correlated and compared with previous experimental results. The analysis indicated that the pressure rise delay is affected by physical and chemical factors as well as thermodynamic parameters that control the several forms of energy during the delay period.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670026
G. C. Lawrason, W. L. Rollwitz
A unique system has been devised to measure and telemeter critical temperatures of reciprocating engine components. A prototype has been used to measure the piston pin bearing temperature in a full-scale EMD 2-567D diesel engine.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670090
M. Vulliamy, J. Spiers
Density of exhaust smoke from a diesel engine is a sensitive indication of engine overload and fuel economy. The various lines of development of smokemeters are outlined. It is concluded that, with closely controlled maintenance, calibration, installation, and operating procedures, the two meters most commonly used in Europe are capable of giving adequate results under full-load steady-state testing conditions. A completely new approach to instrumentation for measurement of vehicle smoke emission under road or variable speed conditions is needed if satisfactory rapid test methods are to be evolved. In a British Standard for Diesel Engines for Road Vehicles engine rating is linked to an exhaust smoke density limit. It has been shown experimentally, that in steady-state testing, subjective acceptability of the smoke emission can be related to measured density on a sliding scale basis related to emission rate.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670935
G. F. Hyde, J. E. Cromwell, W. C. Arnold
Operating conditions in high performance diesel engines cause temperature sensitive chromium plate and oxidation sensitive molybdenum coatings to fail prematurely. Thesecoatings are evaluated by means of laboratory and engine test results. Comparisons are then made with several newly tested coatings including metallic carbides and a molybdenum-chromium carbide mixture.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670947
Thomas J. Pearsall, Charles G. Garabedian
Two different approaches were used to adapt a compression ignition engine to operate with anhydrous ammonia fuel. The first version was achieved by simply supplying ammonia vapor in the induction air system and using the fuel injection system to furnish a pilot charge of diesel fuel for ignition purposes. The second version was a conversion to spark ignition. Direct injection of liquid ammonia into a high compression ratio (30:1) engine was attempted and was unsuccessful.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670949
James R. Ware
The selection of a firing order for a 2-stroke, 20 cyl Vee diesel engine is reviewed. Effects of the firing order on crankshaft design and combustion are discussed. Also outlined are the application of a larger bore cylinder in the framework of an existing crankcase and the developments of piston, cylinder head, and crankcase needed to operate with the increased thermal and mechanical loading of the larger bore. The increased air flow provided by turbocharger modifications made possible a 20 cyl engine with marine rating of 3600 bhp. Means for multiple usage of this engine in vessels are suggested.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670950
Wolfgang Hempel
Since 1965, the market for propulsion plants for large merchant vessels has shown an increasing trend towards medium-speed geared plants. An economic analysis determines the reasons why the medium-speed engine can compete with the slow-running, direct-propulsion, two-stroke engine. The various influences on the types of cost are examined and the cost parameter range within which the medium-speed geared plant is competitive will be marked out. An optimization analysis clarifies the cost advantages that will be provided by tomorrow's still larger medium-speed four-stroke diesels.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670519
0. Herschmann
To meet the increased power demands for special vehicles, Daimler-Benz started the development of a compact, liquid-cooled diesel engine family some 12 years ago. The objective of this development was to obtain a maximum output from a given bulk volume while maintaining well-known diesel engine characteristics. The basic layout of this family was such as to offer a high degree of versatility and to allow continued development. Based on this existing engine family, the development of a 1500 hp engine was started about three years ago. Reducing the bulk volume and, at the same time, increasing the specific output, resulted in a very compact engine, producing 28.4 hp per cu ft of bulk volume. This paper presents some of the considerations made in the design of these engines and some interesting technical data.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670934
Paul R. Shepler, Carl S. Weinberger
The use of the factorial method of testing is demonstrated for four diesel engines. Each engine was investigated in a series of eight tests for the effect of seven parameters on oil consumption and blowby. This method of testing is shown to be efficient in surveying effects of test parameters. The factorial approach forces well-planned experiments, gives equal weight to each of the factors being studied, forces the experimenter to keep other factors constant, and produces results in an efficient manner.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670953
C. F. PERRY
The environment which surrounds the U. S. Navy marine power plant installation is a major consideration in the selection and rating of diesel engines. Some of the Navy's efforts in identifying and minimizing the effects of influencing environmental forces are described. New evaluation, specification and procurement techniques are being studied for the purpose of providing more positive controls over the influencing environmental forces.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670952
Maurice R. Hauschildt, Charles L. Miller
The PG-84 Class is the first class application of a combined diesel or gas turbine (CODOG) powerplant in a United States Naval ship. A controllable-reversible pitch propeller provides the means of reversal. The marinization work necessary to adapt an aircraft gas turbine for marine use is described. Although some operating problems have developed in the first few months of service, the CODOG concept has been proven to provide great improvements over the characteristics available either with all diesel or all gas turbine drive.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670964
Donald R. Harsell, Alan A. Schetelich
The formulation of oils for HD diesel engine operation is a field on the threshold of change after years of conventional appearance. Oil companies now formulate very versatile HD oils—some multigraded, some low ash—meeting the most severe requirements for passenger car performance as well as meeting the newest HD diesel engine requirements. This paper presents the nature and the performance of these new HD diesel oils.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670846
Roger D. Schaufele, Ann W. Ebeling
The aerodynamic design and development of the wing and high lift system for the DC-9 family of short-to-medium range jet transports are reviewed. Preliminary design methods used to establish major wing features such as area, sweep, average thickness, and taper are discussed as well as the more detailed design procedures. Correlation of final flight test data on the Series 30 with early estimates show that, for the DC-9 wing and high lift system, the available methods resulted in a design that met all aerodynamic criteria established during the early design phase.

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: