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Viewing 164191 to 164220 of 170474
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500098
F. GLEN SHOEMAKER
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500092
A. H. DEIMEL
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500060
V. OUTMAN, G. S. GRAFF
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500087
J. A. MORLEY
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500056
CLARK R. LUPTON
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500054
V. D. POLHEMUS, Suspension Engineer
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500047
DON E. BLOODGOOD
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500074
DUNCAN E. MACDONALD
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500067
R. M. SCHAEFER
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500063
MERRILL C. HORINE
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500185
F.C. Mock, D.R. Ganger
ACHIEVEMENT of a high degree of atomization and evenness of distribution - particularly at low fuel rates-are major needs in the field of gas turbine powerplant fuel spray nozzles. Since the swirl type of nozzle is inadequate to meet these needs, according to the authors, it is being abandoned in favor of duplex nozzles, which have the advantage of holding up the energy of atomization at low deliveries. The duplex nozzle is also easy to manufacture and has a wide available range of fuel flows, compared with the simplex nozzle.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500183
Martin A. Elliott, Rogers F. Davis
THE relation between fuel/air ratio and the products of incomplete combustion is discussed here, as well as the probable origin of these products. The authors observed a relation between concentration of aldehydes and the odorous and irritating character of diesel exhaust gas. This relation suggested to them that removal of aldehydes should reduce odor and irritation of the exhaust gases. Tests with water as a scrubbing medium showed that aldehydes cannot be removed completely by such a system. However, aqueous sodium sulfite solutions inhibited by the addition of hydroquinone to prevent oxidation of the sulfite remove substantially all of the aldehydes and effect significant reductions in odor and irritation for extended periods of time. The paper discusses also the application of data on exhaust-gas composition to the determination of operating and performance data on diesel engines.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500197
EARLE A. RYDER
SUMMARY Present position of the piston engine; it still powers all operational commercial transports and all production types of heavy military bombers. The Wasp Major, a 28 cylinder engine of 3500 h.p. is currently used in many ships, ranging from the single engine Martin Mauler to the six engine B-36 Bomber. The process of development of large aircraft engines and some remarks on experimental methods. A short description of the Wasp Major and details of several research projects which were undertaken to improve the durability and reliability of the engine. The disposal of waste heat and the difficulties it causes. The need for improved oils and the effect of fuel quality.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500189
C.L. Fleming, B.W. Geddes, N.V. Hakala, C.A. Weisel
ALTHOUGH oils containing additives to raise the V.I. to 120-125 have been used for years, there has been some question as to the effect of the improvers on the performance characteristics of the oils. Tests run by the authors under actual service conditions indicate, however, that these high V.I. motor oils do offer the readiest means of combining good low-temperature starting characteristics with low oil consumption properties in a single crankcase lubricant.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500150
H. E. Hesselberg, W. G. Lovell
It is the purpose of this paper to discuss some of the gains in knock-limited engine performance to be made through utilization of fuels of improved antiknock quality, and also to consider a method of approach to the problem of the quantitative evaluation of these gains in terms of the antiknock quality of the fuel. Thermodynamic approaches to the problem of knock-limited power and economy in a gasoline engine have often been made in terms of compression ratio or supercharge. The translation of these relationships, however, into terms of fuel antiknock quality as measured by currently used standards presents some difficulties at present. It is well-known that fuel antiknock quality is one property of a fuel that determines its potential usefulness, but the question is: how much more antiknock quality makes it how much more valuable?
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500176
H.J. WOOD, F. DALLENBACH
PROPOSED in this paper, for which its authors are receiving the Wright Brothers Medal for 1949, is an all-pneumatic system to provide the auxiliary power required by turbine-propelled multiengine aircraft. Compressed air to drive various auxiliary power consumers is obtained by extraction from the compressors of the main propulsion turbines and from a special form of auxiliary gas turbine. This turbine is effective primarily when the main engines are inoperative, and it may be used to start the latter. By proper use of air extracted from the main engines, fuel consumption chargeable to auxiliary power appears, according to the authors, to be as low as for any competitive system. Furthermore, the amount of air extracted is shown to be well within generally accepted limits.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500172
A.F. STAMM, E.P. LAMB
A SIMPLE method of predicting truck performance in terms of grade ability at a given road speed, taking into consideration rolling resistance, air resistance, and chassis friction is presented here. A brief review of fundamental considerations is given first, then the method recommended for predicting vehicle ability at a selected speed, and finally a few words on the prediction of maximum possible road speed and selection of gear ratios. The basis of the solution is the determination and expression of vehicle resistances in terms of horsepower - that is, in terms of forces acting at a velocity. A convenient method of solving the grade problem at a given speed is by means of a tabular computation sheet, which is given, together with tables and charts. These assist in making the computation an easy one as well as giving the necessary data on vehicle resistances.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500141
BENJAMIN LABAREE
This is the first of a three-paper series on the Budd Rail Diesel Car, and it will cover the entire car except for complete diesel power unit installation including air intake, cooling, exhaust, fuel and transmission.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500138
E. R. ROWZEE
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500149
W. P. MOWATT
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500147
HAROLD H. HALL
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500184
Norman Hoertz, R. Max Rogers
THIS review of valve designs covers materials, hard facing, sodium filling, and valve rotating devices, with the thought of giving the operator an insight into the qualities and limitations of their use. Problems related to seats, springs, guides, and tappet clearances, as they are related to valve performance and problems of sticking and burning, are also covered briefly.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500174
E. L. CLINE
TO do its job of generating adequate and reliable horsepower efficiently, the maintenance department must accomplish the following objectives: 1. Keep material and labor costs down. 2. Make correct repair the first time. 3. Place on the road only vehicles that are fit. The author shows how service chassis and engine dynamometers are helping many maintenance departments to attain these goals. He also gives specific suggestions for operators planning to install such equipment. He points out pitfalls to be avoided, if the most efficient use of this machinery is to be attained.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500173
V. G. RAVIOLO
STARTING ability of engines is improved when 5W oil replaces 10W oil at low temperatures, according to the author. In fact, he reports that the average increase in cranking speed is 33%, in comparable engines under similar conditions. At the same time, he shows, there is only a moderate increase in oil consumption and no significant increase in wear with the 5W oils.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500171
JOHN A. REDMOND
AFTER relating a few of the difficulties encountered in the development of high-frequency induction heating for gear teeth, Mr. Redmond discusses some of the equipment and processes now being used, such as the manually indexed turntable. He explains why preheating the gear is necessary before R.F. power is applied and presents data showing the time required to preheat a gear to the desired temperature for induction surface hardening at various power densities. To find out the limitations of the process as far as small teeth are concerned, he also gives the results of R.F. induction hardening a 16-pitch helical gear. This gear was preheated and hardened with 300- kc power.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500170
H. B. KNOWLTON, H. F. KINCAID
INDUCTION heating, the authors show, has been successfully applied to the hardening of many types of gears. Over a million transmission gears have been produced with its aid and thousands of induction-hardened final-drive gears and pinions are giving satisfactory field service. It has resulted in lower costs (due to the substitution of carbon for alloy steel, fewer machining operations, and lower heat-treating costs) and improved quality (due to a lack of distortion and better stress distribution). The first part of this paper, by Mr. Kincaid, covers the equipment and methods used in handling various gear jobs. Then Mr. Knowlton covers the engineering tests and service performance of various types of induction-hardened gears.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500169
W. A. TURUNEN
IN considering the application of the gas turbine to automobiles, the turbine faces competition with existing power units, which are satisfactorily meeting present requirements. Unless the gas turbine can be made sufficiently attractive to promise performance beyond the bounds presently attained by reciprocating engines, its sphere of influence in the automotive field will be restricted. This paper presents comparisons of the calculated performance of a gas turbine engine with that of a comparable reciprocating engine. Some of the possible improvements that may be investigated by turbine designers are listed, together with the advantages and disadvantages of the gas turbine as an automotive powerplant.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500168
J. A. Edgar, H. J. Gibson, R. J. Greenshields, G. W. Pusack
THIS paper presents the results of a survey of the antiknock requirements of commercial vehicles. The fuel requirements of commercial-vehicle and passenger-car engines were found to be quite similar on the basis of maximum requirement for knock-free operation. The commercial-vehicle engines have somewhat lower requirements at high speeds and tend to rate sensitive fuels slightly lower at high speed than do passenger-car engines at the same speeds. Attention is drawn to examples of extreme maladjustment of ignition systems, and the effect of proper adjustment is shown. A wide variation in severity was found among commercial engines. It is indicated that this is not a function of size alone.

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