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Viewing 164191 to 164220 of 169983
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
R. J. FURSTOSS
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
JOEL M. JACOBSON
A REVIEW of fatigue information as it applies to life expectancy calculations for aircraft is presented here. The author shows that the number of factors and the lack of data, as well as of a definite theory, make it impossible to do more than make a reasonable guess of life expectancy. He concludes that repeated load tests still [ILLEGIBLE] to be the most satisfactory method of [ILLEGIBLE] a safe life expectancy.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
T. S. McCRAE
THE production problems associated with turbojet engines are not more complex than those encountered with reciprocating engines, according to the author, but they are of a surprisingly different nature. For instance, he points out that, whereas reciprocating engine parts are made chiefly from forgings, castings, and bar stock, the major portion of the turbojet engine is welded sheet metal structure. Then, the so-called hot parts - the combustion chamber, nozzle diaphragm, turbine, and tail cone - also present entirely new problems. The control of heat distortion caused by the high temperatures and the high temperature differentials in these parts requires closer coordination with metallurgists, steel mills, forge shops, welders, and parts fabricators than is required with reciprocating engines.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
Fred C. Pyper, A. G. MacDougall
SOME of the machine operations that are required in the manufacture of the components of the dynaflow transmission are described here. To meet the rigid requirements for accuracy at a sufficiently high volume to reach the projected schedule, it was necessary to purchase 493 new machines, and to relocate, retool, and, in some cases, rework 180 machines. In addition, a large amount of foundry equipment, forge and sheet metal presses, and automatic screw machines was retooled for producing dynaflow parts.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
Ernst W. Spannhake
THIS analysis explains the basic behavior of torque converters by the application of simple hydrodynamic theory. The equations make possible evaluation of the relative merit of torque converters having various performance characteristics. The equations are useful also for indicating the influence of design changes.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
H. F. BARR, E. N. COLE
TO illustrate a successful approach to the problem of designing a higher compression engine, the authors show here the course followed in the development of the new Cadillac engine. Although it appears the basic design of this engine can be used up to a compression ratio of 12-1, the authors say that the actual compression ratio of the future Cadillac engine will depend upon: 1. The production of higher octane fuel at a suitable price. 2. Technological progress by the petroleum industry. 3. The urgency of the need for conserving our natural resources. 4. How insistently the motorist demands more miles per dollar. 5. Plain, old-fashioned competition.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
CARL W. GEORGI
LABORATORY and road tests are reported that show volatility, viscosity, and viscosity index to be the three most important physical properties affecting the consumption tendencies of motor oils. These tests indicate further that oils having low volatility, within defined limits, high viscosity, and high viscosity index tend to possess the lowest consumption characteristics.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
AUSTIN M. WOLF
THE auxiliary transmission and the 2-speed axle are not in direct competition as methods of obtaining multiratio gearing for, as Mr. Wolf points out, neither can fill the field of the other. Where their reduction ratios overlap, Mr. Wolf says that the 2-speed axle is more economical in first cost and can give speedier performance at a lower operating cost. On the other hand, he shows that when larger reductions are required than the 2-speed axle can provide or where three ratios are needed, the auxiliary transmission is without a peer. In general, he says that the type of multiratio gearing that should be used and in what combination depends on the type of truck operation and the degree of economy the operator will obtain from the additional investment.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
E. S. JENKINS, C. D. P. PANCU
THE trend of large, fast airplane designs is toward greater flexibility and more rapid application of landing and flight loads. With this combination of conditions, the inertia forces associated with the elastic distortions of the structure can not be ignored. In turn, the elastic forces are changed so that a rigid-body load analysis becomes inadequate and dynamic load analysis is necessary and of significant advantage in promoting efficient structural design. If the history of the exciting forces is known, a dynamic analysis is feasible by the methods described here. These methods require careful application to account successfully for the complex distortions of the airplane structure. The responses are calculated by a classical linearized solution; these are then employed in the determination of loads. An example of the dynamic bending moments in an airplane hull during a water landing and another example of the dynamic shears in an airplane wing traversing a gust are given.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
J. A. Edgar, J. M. Plantfeber, R. F. Bergstrom
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
K. E. VAN EVERY
THE practical aerodynamic problems encountered in designing aircraft for flight in the transonic range are discussed here. Raising the effective critical Mach number of an airplane is shown to be a more efficient method of increasing speed than either an increase in engine power or a decrease in parasite drag. Aerodynamic problems of both low and high speed, which result from designing for high speed, are discussed. It is concluded that the aerodynamic problems connected with the design of high-speed aircraft are fairly well defined but that further experimental and theoretical research is required to solve these problems and establish design details. In particular, further correlation between wind tunnel and flight tests is needed in order to arrive at practical engineering solutions to the problems encountered in designing transonic aircraft. For this paper, Mr. Van Every was awarded the 1948 Wright Brothers Medal by the Society of Automotive Engineers.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
A. T. Colwell
Standard
1949-01-01
Parts, such as bolts, turbine wheels, discs, buckets, and blades, for high strength and oxidation resistance up to 1500 F when suitably heat treated.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
F. C. Mock
ABSTRACT
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
J. M. STOKELY
EARING failures - what causes them and how to investigate them - are covered in this well-illustrated paper. The author points out that the problem is not solved merely by saying that a failure is caused by fatigue or corrosion. He says that the operator must continue to operate the engine having the failure, so that the specific cause can be located and a recurrence of the trouble prevented.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
G. M. LANGE, C. W. VAN OVERBEKE
THIS paper describes available injection systems for spark-ignition engines. In the near future, the authors predict, simplified injection pump designs, probably of the single-plunger type, will be universally available for both compression-ignition and spark-ignition engines. The authors also say that recent developments in injection system components substantiate the claims of the injection equipment suppliers that they will meet the demands for low-cost equipment.
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
GEORGE E. DUNN
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
1949-01-01
Condensation of a talk given by C. C. Cipriani, chief of the spark plug engineering division of The Electric Auto-Lite Company, at the November meeting of the Toronto section of the Society of Automotive Engineers.
Magazine
1948-12-01
Magazine
1948-11-01
Standard
1948-11-01
To specify minimum requirements for Electric Tachometers primarily for use in reciprocating engine powered civil transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aeronautical Standard covers magnetic drag tachometers with or without built-in synchroscopes.
Standard
1948-11-01
To specify minimum requirements for carbon monoxide detector instruments for use in aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instrument to the environmental conditions specified in Paragraph 3.3. This standard is not intended to cover fire detectors. This Aeronautical Standard covers the basic type of carbon monoxide detector instrument used to determine toxic concentrations of carbon monoxide by the measurement of heat changes through catalytic oxidation.
Standard
1948-11-01
This Aerospace Standard establishes the minimum sage performance standards for electrical type temperature instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.4. This Aerospace Standard covers two basic types of temperature instruments as follows: TYPE I Radiometer type, actuated by changes in electrical resistance of a temperature sensing electrical resistance element; the resistance changes being obtained by temperature changes of the temperature sensing resistance element. TYPE II: Millivoltmeter type, operated and actuated by varying E.M.F. output of a thermocouple; the varying E.M.F. input to the instrument being obtained by temperature changes of the temperature sensing thermocouple.
Standard
1948-11-01
This Aerospace Standard establishes the essential minimum safe performance standards for manifold pressure instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aerospace Standard covers two basic types of manifold pressure instruments as follows: TYPE I - Direct Indicating. TYPE II - Remote Indicating.
Standard
1948-11-01
This specification covers mixtures of methyl alcohol and/or ethyl alcohol with water in the form of liquids.

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