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Viewing 164191 to 164220 of 172583
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550145
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550150
C. M. JORDAN
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550149
H. C. KIRTLAND
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550111
T. G. ROEHNER, E. L. ARMSTRONG
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550112
H. W. SCHULTZ
Abstract As data obtained from experimental testing of friction materials operating in oil have long been a subject of controversy between transmission engineers, we present a brief description of several test machines and associate instrumentation, in general use today. Namely: A constant drive - constant torque unit, an inertia type dynamometer. (This unit is most generally used), and finally, a new design which operates both the drive and driven members simulating most any transmission operation desired. Here, the same fundamental instrumentation is used as that for a test transmission. Regardless of the unit, most of the following data is recorded depending on flexibility and instrumentation: 1. Torque 2. Deceleration or acceleration 3. Temperatures of oil 4. Operating pressures 5. Speed, plus various other data as requested.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550109
C. R. CASE
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550110
J. L. BROUGHTEN, C. C. MOORE
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550107
P. V. TOFFOLI
A much higher degree of skill is required in lubricating automotive wheel bearings. This skill requirement coupled with many varying recommendations for wheel bearing lubrication has resulted in a situation where the majority of wheel bearing and wheel bearing grease complaints are caused by mishandling of product and by improper servicing. In recognition of this problem, the Technical Committee of the National Lubricating Grease Institute established a Subcommittee which developed “Recommended Practices for Lubricating Automotive Front Wheel Bearings”. These procedures incorporated suggestions made by oil companies and automobile, truck, and bearing manufacturers. Universal adoption and application of these recommended practices and more uniform recommendations by the automotive and petroleum industries will “take the confusion out of wheel bearing lubrication”.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550108
T. A. ROBERTSON, R. P. POWERS
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550105
J. M. STOKELY
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550103
J. D. NEESLEY, L. C. BRUNSTRUM, H. J. LIEHE
New automatic chassis lubricators renew lubricant problems. Oils feed well but drip from the bearings; chassis greases do not drip but feed poorly. A new rheopectic grease overcomes these deficiencies. Originally, it is fluid like an oil, yet upon one pass through the lubricator, it acquires the consistency of a chassis grease. Normal handling has no effect on its fluidity and use has little effect upon its set-up consistency. Thus, it feeds well but does not drip.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550106
J. F. McGROGAN
A road test was conducted by the Automotive Laboratory of The Atlantic Refining Company on six cars, each of two different makes, to obtain the driver's reactions to four chassis lubricants. Factors to be evaluated included squeaks heard by the driver. An investigation was made of the influence of grease composition on chassis performance; greases tested included an aluminum stearate grease, two lithium soap thickened greases and a non-soap type of grease. Results indicate that a 1,000 mile lubrication frequency is important since a large increase in complaints beyond 1,250 miles of operation was recorded.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550104
J. A. BELL
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550101
J. B. BELTZ
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550102
CARL H. MUELLER
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550099
R. A. Roggenbuck, R. D. Jeska
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550100
A. M. SMITH
Abstract The classes of radioisotope applications are discussed. The scope of the requirements for special facilities are indicated and the facilities available at the Ford laboratory are briefly described. A brief summary of the special techniques used for making radioactive Piston Ring Rotation, Air Flow, Gasket Leakage and Oil Mixing Measurements is given. Some other applications attempted by the Ford Laboratory are enumerated. Four general categories of isotope applications which should come into wide spread usage are described.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550098
D. P. HEATH, C. W. HOFFMAN, J. H. REYNOLDS
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550298
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550299
E. J. McLAUGHLIN, J. A. BERT
Abstract A commercial kerosene, low freezing point kerosene (JP-1), and JP-4 are discussed as possible commercial transport jet fuels. Relative performance of these fuels is given. Estimated demand for a commercial jet fuel is small, and it is concluded that adequate quantities of any of the three fuels could be supplied by the petroleum industry. Relative fuel prices on the West and Gulf Coasts are discussed. It is predicted that kerosene and JP-4 will have about equal prices to the airlines. It is concluded that JP-1 type fuel would be the most expensive of the three fuels.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550300
J. T. DYMENT
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550301
CARLOS WOOD
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550302
GEORGE. S SCHAIRER
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550303
R.P. BUSCHMANN
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550001
A. Hundere, G. C. Lawrason, L. P. O'Meara
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550003
BEN D. MILLS
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550004
N. W. FESMIRE

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