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Viewing 164191 to 164220 of 187952
1972-01-01
Technical Paper
725029
J. Wei, D. P. Osterhout, J. C. W. Kuo, C. D. Prater, P. W. Snyder
The general rules adopted in the development of automotive emission control catalytic converter models are to quantify all the essential physical and chemical phenomena related to the converter performance by separate laboratory experiments, and to minimize the complexity of the models by excluding from the models the less important phenomena. By adhering to these rules, predictive catalytic converter math models were constructed for both particle or monolithic support catalysts using either noble or base metal as active ingredients. The models have been used as a useful research and development tool for exploring the direction for improving total emission control systems, including catalyst development, engine calibration modification, converter location and converter design studies. The strategy in the application of the models is to maintain a continuous dialogue between test results and the math model predictions to a total vehicle-converter system that can meet stated goals.
CURRENT
1972-01-01
Standard
AIR1207
Today's sophisticated aircraft are required to effectively perform a variety of missions. With the advent of micro-miniaturization in electronics and advanced digital computers, a new generation of avionics equipment and systems can be utilized to increase the capabilities of the aircraft. As the quantity and variety of equipment and functions increases, the problems of inter-connecting these equipments with wires presents a constraint on size, weight, signal conditioning, reliability, maintainability and electromagnetic control. Conventional wiring has resulted in large bundles of wires and many connectors which adds excessive weight and reduces the space available for the pilot and other vital elements. This limitation can be relieved significantly by the application of well proven multiplexing techniques.
1972-01-01
Technical Paper
726046
Albert J. Slechter
This paper reports on the progress of the United States Experimental Safety Vehicle Program. This includes test results to date, some preliminary conclusions based on the work and an outline of future plans leading to the completion of the major ESV program objectives. AMF and Fairchild prototype vehicles are examined. Crash test and dummy performance results are outlined. Passenger compartment integrity and passive occupant protection are analyzed.
1972-01-01
Technical Paper
726041
Tatsuo Hasegawa
Toyota Motor Company has been endeavoring to make technological progress in the field of vehicle safety, and we have made up our minds to build a Toyota ESV prototype in cooperation with the ESV project of the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Japanese Government. Crashworthiness is the major purpose in the Toyota ESV design. Toyota will work to attain current ESV specification and contribute to accident avoidance specifications.
1972-01-01
Technical Paper
726039
Yoshio Serizawa
Nissan's Experimental Safety Vehicle is a small-sized passenger car. "Small-sized" means small in overall dimensions and light weight. Differences between the Japanese 2,500 pound ESV and the 4,000 pound ESV specifications are outlined. This paper discusses small car safety and ESV specifications
HISTORICAL
1972-01-01
Standard
J754_197201
This SAE Information Report is an introduction to lubricant classifications, specifications, and types in common use today. It emphasizes the desirability of using a minimum number of lubricants. Pertinent SAE reports are called out for easy reference. Lubricant abbreviations have been included that will assist in preparation of lubrication charts (described in SAE J753). Table 1 lists the components of construction and industrial equipment and the various lubricants which may be used. Table 2 lists lubricant types and identifying abbreviations. Lubricants that had common usage in the past are retained in Table 2 to show where the new specifications originated.
HISTORICAL
1972-01-01
Standard
J754A_197201
This SAE Information Report is an introduction to lubricant classifications, specifications, and types in common use today. It emphasizes the desirability of using a minimum number of lubricants. Pertinent SAE reports are called out for easy reference. Lubricant abbreviations have been included that will assist in preparation of lubrication charts (described in SAE J753). Table 1 lists the components of construction and industrial equipment and the various lubricants which may be used. Table 2 lists lubricant types and identifying abbreviations. Lubricants that had common usage in the past are retained in Table 2 to show where the new specifications originated.
HISTORICAL
1972-01-01
Standard
AIR818B
This Aerospace Information Report, (AIR) is intended to provide the sponsors of Aerospace Standards, (AS), with standard wording, formatting, and minimum environment and design requirements for use in the preparation of their document. The individual shall use only those parts of this AIR which apply to their particular document. The individual sponsor may expand the standard wording, especially under Sections 4, 5, and 6 as required. The paragraphs of this AIR shall be used verbatim wherever possible. Unless otherwise directed by SAE, cross referenced documents shall be called out by specific revision letter, e.g. "shall be in accordance with AS XXXXB." In addition, all non-SAE documents called out shall include the document title when initially identified. However, every effort shall be made to keep cross-referencing to an absolute minimum.
HISTORICAL
1972-01-01
Standard
AS1188
This specification covers minimum design and test requirements for aircraft tire inflation-deflation equipment for use on all types of aircraft. It shall be the responsibility of the airframe manufacturer to determine the compatibility of the requirement with the applicable aircraft and to specify requirements in excess of these minimums as necessary.
HISTORICAL
1972-01-01
Standard
J286_197201
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended as a guide toward implementation of a standard practice but may be subject to frequent change to keep pace with experience and technical advances. This should be kept in mind when considering its use. The SAE No. 2 friction test machine is used to evaluate the friction characteristics of automatic transmission plate clutch with automotive transmission fluids. It can also be used to conduct durability tests on wet friction systems. This Standard is intended for common use by both suppliers and end users to define minimum test machine requirements to allow objective comparisons of wet friction material system performance.
1972-01-01
Technical Paper
726043
HIDEO SUGIURA
HISTORICAL
1972-01-01
Standard
J397A_197201
This SAE Standard applies to operator protective structures which may commonly be a part of construction, forestry, mining, and industrial machines. To establish limits on deflection permissible during laboratory evaluations of certain operator protective structures, such as ROPS, FOPS, OPS, and FOG as defined in other SAE standards.
CURRENT
1971-12-15
Standard
ARP590B
1971-12-01
Standard
J282_197112
ABSTRACT
HISTORICAL
1971-12-01
Standard
AS1212
The standard delineates the characteristics of electric power supplied to airborne equipment at the equipment terminals and the requirements for the utilization of such electric power by the airborne equipment. The purpose of this standard is to foster compatibility between aircraft electric systems or ground support electric systems and airborne utilization equipment to the extent of confining the aircraft and ground support electric power characteristics within definitive limits and restricting the requirements imposed on the power by the airborne utilization equipment.
HISTORICAL
1971-12-01
Standard
J131A_197112
This SAE Standard provides design parameters and general requirements for motorcycle turn signal lamps. It does not apply to mopeds.
HISTORICAL
1971-12-01
Standard
J584B_197112
This SAE Standard provides design parameter and general requirements for motorcycle headlamps.
HISTORICAL
1971-12-01
Standard
J278_197112
This document provides test methods and requirements for the stop lamp on snowmobiles.
HISTORICAL
1971-12-01
Standard
J277_197112
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods and requirements for maintenance of design voltage in snowmobile electrical systems. It pertains to both battery-equipped and batteryless systems.

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