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Viewing 164191 to 164220 of 170505
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500195
F.E. Carroll
Many tests have shown that engine oil pumps are the limiting factor in providing satisfactory high-altitude aircraft oil system performance. As is pointed out in this paper, it is for this reason that both reciprocating and gas turbine engine manufacturers should design and provide their engines with a pump that will give satisfactory performance at an inlet pressure of 2 in. of Hg absolute with 10% (by volume) entrained air. Of the various oil systems investigated by the AMC, the closed-circuit system seemed to be most desirable in terms of both performance and installation, for use in high-altitude operational aircraft.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500193
Vernon H. Gray
Gas-heated hollow propeller blades have been investigated both analytically and experimentally to determine heat requirements for the prevention of icing on the blade surfaces during flight. An analysis was made of a typical hollow propeller blade to determine the internal gas flow and temperature required to maintain the external surface temperature above 32 F. The basic wet-air equation is given and curves are presented to illustrate the blade heating and temperature distributions which were obtained for one set of conditions. Full-scale gas-heated propellers have also been investigated experimentally in an icing wind tunnel and typical results are presented. The rates of heating required to prevent icing are discussed and a modification of propeller blade interiors by using fins and partitions is shown by comparative experiments to permit large reductions in the required heat-source input.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500192
S.D. Heron, A.E. Felt
DATA obtained with a cylinder of passenger-car-engine size are discussed. Compression ratios of from 5.7 to 15 to 1 have been explored rather completely with four types of combustion chamber. The investigation of this compression ratio range has included the determination of fuel economy at 1200 and 3000 rpm, with particular emphasis on part-load economy. In order to make it possible to compare results over a wide range of compression ratios, fuel economy data are presented in terms of relative thermal efficiency. Knocking data are presented in terms of air density in the combustion chamber and in terms of an empirical equivalent of air density. It is shown that, over a considerable compression ratio range, the knock-limited combustion-chamber air density on isooctane or 80 octane-20 heptane is independent of compression ratio. It is shown that turbulence has rather considerable effects in improving part-load economy and knock-limited performance.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500190
Gosta Vennerholm, H.N. Bogart, R.B. Melmoth
NODULAR cast iron, so called because the graphite is present as finely dispersed, well-rounded particles, is made in two stages: The first stage consists of the addition of magnesium or other carbide formers, which promote the formation of white iron in one normally solidifying gray. In the second stage a ferrosilicon type of inoculant overcomes the tendency toward white iron and causes the graphite to precipitate out in the form of small spherulites. The methods of making nodular iron, the effect of composition on physical properties, economic factors involved, and potential applications are discussed in this paper.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500191
Edmond R. Retailliau, Harold A. Ricards, Minor C.K. Jones
IT has been found by the authors that fuels fed to a crbureted spark-ignition engine may undergo severe “prereactions” during the compression stroke prior to spark ignition as differentiated from “preflame” reactions which take place ahead of the advancing flame front in the remaining unburned part of the air/fuel mixture in the cylinder after ignition. It appears that the extent of prereactions is a function of fuel type and engine operating variables. The alteration or prereaction of fuels increases with severity of engine operation. Intake temperature and compression ratio are major variables affecting engine severity. These tests show that the prereactions play an important part in the knocking phenomenon.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500188
G. Mervin Ault, G. C. Deutsch
RESULTS of a research program designed to find improved materials for jet engine blades is presented here. These blades are subjected to a very severe combination of conditions, including high temperatures and stresses. The search for materials capable of meeting these conditions has led from high-temperature alloys to ceramics, and from ceramics to ceramals-combinations of ceramics and metals that, it is hoped, can be made to combine the advantages of both materials. Although the goal of a material that can stand a temperature of 3500 F under the conditions of operation has not yet been reached, substantial improvements have been made in prolonging life at current temperatures and for increasing peak cycle temperatures.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500189
C.L. Fleming, B.W. Geddes, N.V. Hakala, C.A. Weisel
ALTHOUGH oils containing additives to raise the V.I. to 120-125 have been used for years, there has been some question as to the effect of the improvers on the performance characteristics of the oils. Tests run by the authors under actual service conditions indicate, however, that these high V.I. motor oils do offer the readiest means of combining good low-temperature starting characteristics with low oil consumption properties in a single crankcase lubricant.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500153
V. E. YUST
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500155
A. R. ISITT, M. R. WALL, A. G. CATTANEO
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500154
W. F. FORD, O. L. SPILLMAN
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500148
Alfred C. Gunsaulus
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500149
W. P. MOWATT
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500151
W. V. HANLEY
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500150
H. E. Hesselberg, W. G. Lovell
It is the purpose of this paper to discuss some of the gains in knock-limited engine performance to be made through utilization of fuels of improved antiknock quality, and also to consider a method of approach to the problem of the quantitative evaluation of these gains in terms of the antiknock quality of the fuel. Thermodynamic approaches to the problem of knock-limited power and economy in a gasoline engine have often been made in terms of compression ratio or supercharge. The translation of these relationships, however, into terms of fuel antiknock quality as measured by currently used standards presents some difficulties at present. It is well-known that fuel antiknock quality is one property of a fuel that determines its potential usefulness, but the question is: how much more antiknock quality makes it how much more valuable?
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500144
WAYNE LASKY, M. A. HANSON, H. E. FRANK
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500146
H. W. BARTH, D. M. LYON, R. B. WALLIS
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500147
HAROLD H. HALL
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500141
BENJAMIN LABAREE
This is the first of a three-paper series on the Budd Rail Diesel Car, and it will cover the entire car except for complete diesel power unit installation including air intake, cooling, exhaust, fuel and transmission.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500140
GEO. W. LESCHER, JAS. A. STERHARDT
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500143
VERNON SCHAFER
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500137
H. H. ALLEN, LOUIS REZNECK
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500139
L. H. NAGLER
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500136
H. O. MATHENS
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500138
E. R. ROWZEE
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500132
WALTER LANGSEDER
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500135
ERNEST J. ABBOTT

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