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Viewing 164191 to 164220 of 173132
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560166
GILBERT C. BARNES, EARLE A. RYDER
Summary: The heavily loaded thrust bearing in aircraft turbines must be 100% reliable, which requires a different philosophy from that on which catalog ratings are based, namely, 10% of failures. Principal problems are: 1) to raise the minimum life of bearings regardless of the wide spread between minimum and maximum, and 2) to raise the permissible operating temperature. Metallurgical improvements offer the best possibilities for gain in 1 and 2 above. Other factors such as geometry, finish, and dimensional accuracy are helpful in category 1 but do not promise large gains.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560175
C. W. LINCOLN
Abstract As the internal combustion engine began to replace the horse, the Ackermann non-turning front axle came into its own. With increasing front-end loads, reducing gears replaced simple tiller connections between hands of driver and front wheels. The story of manual steering gears is that of continued engineering effort to increase efficiency within the gear-box, to hold down steering effort and amount of “wheeling” required, as loads have gone up and tire pressures down. In the last few years, power steering for passenger cars has been introduced. At the start a luxury, it is fast becoming a necessity.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560177
H. A. REYNOLDS
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560178
STEPHEN G. DEMIRJIAN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560171
JOSEPH PALSULICH, R. H. RIEDEL
This paper describes some of the problems encountered in sealing various media in aircraft gas turbine engine main shaft and accessory drive applications. The major types of seals are illustrated, and the individual design and operating limits of each are discussed. The seal performance requirements for the present and near future gas turbine engines are indicated. An evaluation program directed towards the development of a seal materials combination which will be compatible for extremely high speed and high temperature operation is described and some tests results enumerated. The equipment used for testing of materials and complete seal assemblies is described and pictured.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560172
R. L. OVERCASH, W. HART, D. J. McCLURE
Experimental oils were compounded in such a manner that the effect of volatility and viscosity on consumption could be studied independently. Close cut fractions between 40 and 170 S.U.S. at 100 deg F showed differing volatility characteristics in laboratory engine tests as measured by consumption rate, viscosity increase, and vacuum distillation. Consumption properties were also studied for oils with constant volatility, but varying in viscosity from 2 cs to 6 cs at 350 deg F. Laboratory and road tests of viscosity index improved motor oils indicated that their consumption characteristics varied in relation to oils with no viscosity index improver.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560173
Raymond Capiaux
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560174
H. E. CARD, R. L. MATHIAS
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560323
MAX J. TAUSCHEK
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560320
D.H. RAUCH, D.A. MALOHN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560319
R. H. BEADLE
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560322
R.R. PARKER
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560321
Sidney E. Miller
APPLICATION of injection equipment, especially designed for gasoline, to the stock V-8 passenger-car engine is described here. The port-injection system tested basically consists of an injection pump driven at half crankshaft speed, a mixture control governing the pump setting, a motor-driven fuel supply pump maintaining fuel pressures above the vapor pressure of gasoline, and the associated nozzles and fuel filter. Advantages of converting a stock carbureted engine to gasoline injection include 10% greater full-throttle horsepower output, a minimum decrease of 500 rpm in torque peak position, 5–15% more miles per gallon, and the use of fuels having higher vapor pressures and end points.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560315
C.G.A. Rosen
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560316
A. S. BLACK
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560317
K. A. BEIER
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560318
R. C. HEIDNER, K. R. PIKE
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560311
HYMAN FELDMAN, JAMES P. MORELAND, E. N. HATCH
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560313
JOHN THOMAS, STEPHEN JOHNSON, HOMER T. SEALE, WARD L. BENNETT, B. G. MILSTER
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560314
O. E. Hunt
ABSTRACT
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560307
R. C. GRASBY
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560309
C. J. DOMKE, N. D. ESAU, D. S. GRAY, H. R. TALIAFERRO
The trend toward motor fuels of higher antiknock quality and increased use of aromatic components from catalytic reforming prompted an investigation of the effects of Research and Motor octane numbers and composition on antiknock behavior in high-compression engines. Olefinic and aromatic blends covering a wide octane spread were knock-rated in the laboratory by a procedure designed to eliminate the abnormal ignition timing encountered when fuels are rated on the road. Engine ratings approached or exceeded Research octane number as octane level increased, and decreased with increasing spread between Research and Motor octane numbers. Compression ratio had no effect on engine ratings, but combustion-chamber design apparently affected the performance of highly aromatic fuels. Ratings of all fuels decreased with increase in engine speed, but aromatic blends decreased much less than olefinic blends.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560308
J. F. JOHNSON, E. P. STEEL
Friction materials for use in oil applications have been classified into five types by nature of their composition and characteristics. These types are: Resilient, Woven, Semi-Metallic, Rigid Molded and Sintered Metallic. Specific application of the various types of friction material for band and plate applications in automatic transmissions is presented. The effect of grooving patterns on the frictional characteristics of various materials is discussed. Various use factors to be considered in the selection of a friction material for use in oil are outlined. These are: Frictional Value, Operating Temperatures, Engagement Characteristics, Durability, Conformability, Formability, Release Aids, Unit Pressures and Price.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560310
R. H. FREDERICKS
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560304
J. F. McWHORTER
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560306
J. W. KINCHIN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560303
JOHN H. COX
Tufted automobile carpet is probably the most challenging interior trim development recently seen in automotive manufacture. Contrasted with conventional weaving of auto carpets, the technique is faster, more flexible, and utilizes surface materials for a “new look on the floor”, not previously available to the car producer. A brief comparison of both types of production, along with a sketch of the growth of tufted carpet to its present position of importance in the industry serve to spotlight the fact that the carpet manufacturer has kept pace with the latest style and manufacturing demands of the auto makers.

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