Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 164461 to 164490 of 174127
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580368
A. A. HERSHFIELD
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580366
J. G. KRISILAS, E. S. McCARTHY
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580294
I. N. PALLEY
1958-01-01
Magazine
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580349
D. N. FREY, J. R. HOLLOWELL, J. L. MARTIN
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580336
JOHN P. STAPP, D. L. ENFIELD
SUMMARY The lap belt has been evaluated as a safety restraint for occupants of automotive vehicles by exposing anthropometric dummies and human volunteers to experimental crash decelerations. Air Force and Civilian automobile crash statistics provided typical configurations of accidents. Instrumented anthropomorphic dummies in salvage vehicles were used to duplicate selected accidents by collision into barriers, other vehicles, or by snubbing the vehicle with a cable going to an anchored hydraulic snubber. Electronically and optically recorded data from these experiments provided configurations for simulating crashes with human volunteers on a catapult powered sled on rails accelerated into a preset water inertia brake; a pendulum swing seat arrested by a snubbing cable; a seat propelled by a shock-cord catapult into mechanical pinch brakes; and finally, the salvage automobile decelerated by the hydraulic snubber.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580392
R. W. YOUNG
Abnormal combustion was encountered while investigating combustion chamber configuration in a high compression ratio single cylinder engine once initiated it manifested itself as an uncontrollable form of combustion occurring earlier and earlier in each subsequent engine cycle. This resulted in extreme engine power loss and a violent audible noise. It has been termed runaway preignition. An extensive investigation has been conducted to define, establish the cause, and determine a solution for this combustion phenomenon. This work has been done basically in two different single-cylinder laboratory engines. The combustion chambers were maintained essentially deposit free. The fundamental cause of runaway preignition has not been determined. It is promoted by engine design characteristics, such as high compression ratio and combustion chamber geometry. This form of abnormal combustion responds to engine speed, load, spark advance, and fuel-air ratio.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580044
C. F. Taylor, A. R. Rogowski, A. L Hagen, J. D. Koppernaes
THIS paper reports the latest investigation of the relative merits of loop scavenging versus through scavenging. The authors hope that the conditions of the work permitted an objective evaluation of the two types of engines. The results of the study may be summarized as follows: 1. With symmetrical timing, neither cylinder shows significant advantage in trapping efficiency. 2. With symmetrical timing, the best ratio of exhaust-port to inlet-port effective area seems to be about 0.6. 3. Unsymmetrical timing is an effective method of improving trapping efficiency. 4. The value of net indicated fuel economy shows no significant difference between the two cylinders. The authors point out that because the areas were equal it is unlikely that the optimum port design of each type was used in comparing the cylinders. If optimum porting had been used, the two types might have shown more difference.
1958-01-01
Standard
AMS5565D
This specification covers a corrosion-resistant steel in the form of welded tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts, such as fluid-conducting lines not subjected to high pressure, requiring good corrosion resistance, but usage is not limited to such applications. Welding, brazing, or other exposure to temperatures over 800 degrees F (427 degrees C) during fabrication may impair corrosion resistance.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580063
R. E. Gish, J. D. McCullough, J. B. Retzloff, H. T. Mueller
RELIABLE predictions of the improvements in efficiency that can be obtained by raising the compression ratio of spark-ignition engines are of obvious value in the long-range planning of both the automotive and petroleum industries. New equipment and techniques were developed to measure indicated power by obtaining accurate pressure-volume measurements in each cylinder, thus permitting true friction to be determined as the difference between the indicated power of all cylinders and the simultaneously measured brake power. Tests were conducted on a 4-cylinder engine at compression ratios of 7/1 and 12/1.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580398
R. A. QUADT
New trends leading away from small, simple impacts in soft aluminum alloys are cited. Among these are longer, larger, and more complex impacts in stronger, heat treatable alloys and in compacted sintered aluminum powder for higher temperatures. Large complex parts are produced at Hunter Douglas Aluminum Division having multiple O.D.'s and I.D.'s, nonsymmetrical cross sections, and bosses mid-length on their O.D.'s or I.D.'s. Examples and possible new applications are mentioned. Improved extrusion blanks or billets, lubricants, presses, and tooling are credited for making these developments possible.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580098
JAMES H. KRAMER
1958-01-01
Standard
AMS4013
This specification covers aluminum and aluminum alloy foil in the form of laminated sheet.
1958-01-01
Standard
AMS5575F
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of welded tubing.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580395
R. M. SCHAEFER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580364
CARL A. GOLUEKE
SUMMARY Airborne electronics as used in current aircraft are normally quite fragile in relation to the environment. The gap is being bridged by the use of isolators. The state of the art in ruggedization techniques for electronics is sufficiently advanced to preclude the use of isolators, but experience indicates that this advance is not being exploited in aircraft applications. This paper presents some specific vibration levels that general airborne electronics and component parts will withstand without the benfit of vibration isolators. Because of the large scope and complexity of the electronics area, it is to be realized that these susceptibility levels are only generalized indications. Also, applicability and function of vibration isolators is briefly discussed.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580018
S. D. Jeffe, B. W. Cartwright
THIS paper describes the Chrysler TorqueFlite transmission, a 3-speed unit with torque converter. The discussion includes details of the push-button controls of the automatic transmission, operation of the transmission and hydraulic controls, power transmission through the gearbox, and design of several of the components. The authors think that the TorqueFlite offers to a greater degree the advantages of automatic transmission: ease of operation and maximum power over a wide range of car speeds.
1958-01-01
Standard
AMS5570G
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of seamless tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts requiring both corrosion and heat resistance, especially when such parts are welded during fabrication, and also for parts requiring oxidation resistance up to 1500 degrees F (816 degrees C) but useful at that temperature only when stresses are low; usage is not limited to such applications.
1958-01-01
Standard
AMS5548
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of sheet and strip. These products have been used typically for parts requiring high strength and oxidation resistance up to 800 degrees F (427 degrees C) and where such parts require welding during fabrication, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580016
A. F. Ensrud
PROBLEMS resulting from increased temperature associated with flight at supersonci speeds, the serious effects of aerodynamic heating on material properties, and the ultimate strength of assembled structures are discussed in this paper. Ways are outlined which will alleviate the intrinsic weight penalties accompanying the use of high-density alloys at elevated temperatures. Primarily, this can be accomplished by the proper selection of materials and the choice of more suitable structural configurations. Suggestions are made how to lessen the peaks of thermal stresses induced by temperature gradients during the interval of transient heating. The need for efficient stabilization of compression panels subjected to thermal environment is pointed out in a general way; and recent innovations which might accomplish this purpose are then discussed with special regard to thin wing and fuselage design.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580021
F. M. Richmond
IMPROVED high-temperature rupture strength and ductility of nickel-base superalloys has been obtained by utilization of vacuum melting and certain modifications in the nominal chemistry of these alloys. A brief description of the melting technique and chemistry modifications is given in this page. The tensile and rupture properties of five nickel-base vacuum-melted alloys are reported for the temperature 1000–1600 F.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580019
F. J. Winchell, W. D. Route, O. K. Kelley
TURBOGLIDE is the deluxe automatic transmission of the General Motors Chevrolet. One of its most important features is that its performance ratio is available at any throttle position, enabling control of torque ratio and engine output by the throttle pedal. The system includes a five-element torque converter, pump, three turbines, and the dual stator. The entire installed unit weighs 148 lb, a result of the general arrangement and the use of aluminum in the case and bell housing. The authors discuss the basic operating principle of the transmission, the arrangement, performance, torque distribution, control system, and valve body.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580043
Bruno R. Siegel
THIS paper explains the temperature-density concept used to measure the antiknock quality of fuels. In this method a laboratory engine is operated at constant fuel-air ratio and peak power spark, with manifold air pressure being used to stress fuels into the knocking zone. According to the author, the data obtained can be analyzed to give a single curve or formula expressing antiknock quality or preignition resistance at any combination of compression ratio, inlet temperature, and manifold pressure. The paper summarizes 14 practical applications, including suggestions for new control and auxiliary test methods for studying knock and autoignition behavior on a much broader basis than is possible with ASTM methods.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580036
V. D. Polhemus, L. J. Kehoe, F. H. Cowin, S. L. Milliken
PART I of this paper describes the basic research and experimental development program of the air-spring suspension, Part II details the application of the principle to the 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham. The authors think that the final design successfully met the development program criteria of cost, size, life, adaptability, and rate characteristics. This design, in turn, offered the features of constant height, smoother ride, and better handling, which appealed to the design engineers working on the Cadillac.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580056
N. L Blume
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580046
Forest R. McFarland, E. G. Peckham, Eric Dietrich
THIS paper describes the springs, control system, and ride of the air suspension system on the 1958 Buick. The system is a semiclosed one, providing a variable-rate suspension, automatic leveling and trim control, and manual lift. The latter feature is a knob below the instrument panel which can be operated when necessary to cope with unusual clearance conditions. The car remains at the same height with loads of up to five passengers and 500 lb in the trunk. The authors describe the road-holding ability of a car with this suspension system as excellent.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580061
G. L. Hershman
THIS paper outlines the advantages and disadvantages of present-day hydraulic systems. Included in the discussion are: the blocked return line system for single-acting cylinders, the blocked pump inlet, and the basic open-center-valve system. More advanced designs mentioned are: open-center-valve systems with cylinders in series and with parallel cylinders, close-centered valve systems with pressure regulator, and the central hydraulic and accumulator systems. The author points out that the advantages and disadvantages of each system depend to a great extent upon the design in which it is used.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580058
M. Alperstein, W. B. Swim, P. H. Schweitzer
THE effects of introducing a portion of the fuel charge of a diesel engine into the intake manifold in the form of a fine mist are reported in this paper. Laboratory tests with swirl-chamber and open-chamber engines resulted in smoke reduction up to 80%, increase in smoke-limited power output up to 18.5%, decrease in specific fuel consumption up to 9.8%, shorter ignition lag, lower maximum rate of pressure rise, and smoother operation. In running on good-grade diesel fuel approximately 15% of the main fuel proved to be as good a manifold fuel as any. It was also found that a diesel engine could operate satisfactorily on substandard fuels down to zero cetane number when fumigation was employed. Maximum benefits from fumigation accrued when inducting fuel in the form of a very fine mist (not over 4 microns) produced by Micro-Fog. As yet an economical method of producing this finely atomized fuel spray in large quantities has not been found.

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: