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Viewing 164461 to 164490 of 182500
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660425
Donald I. Reed
The development of BIA small boat recommended engineering standards closely follows problem areas, the objective being to find a solution that will most economically and easily modify existing practice to maintain an acceptable level of safety. A few of the specific problems for which some new recommended BIA practices offer solutions are described in such areas as electrical systems, fuel systems, compartment ventilation, steering systems, and boat capacity. The overall goal of BIA recommended practices is to enable manufacturers to build better performing and safer products for the public through pooled industry judgment.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660424
Kent M. Savage
The activities of the National Fire Protection Association to foster pleasure craft fire safety are described. NFPA 302, “Fire Protection Standards for Motor Craft,” has been and continues to be a competent public standard in the field of marine fire prevention. The development and use of the standards contained therein are discussed, with special emphasis on the NFPA's continuing review to keep them as up-to-date as possible in the light of new experience and technological advances.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660427
Elmer P. Jasper
The SAE Marine Technical Committee was established late in 1961 to serve as a forum for the exchange of ideas and dissemination of sound and practical engineering knowledge in the area of marine application relating to the engine, its accessories, reverse gears, transmissions, driveline, and propeller shafts. The overall objective of the Committee is to assist in the establishment of standards and recommended practices that will ultimately result in improved boating safety. The current work and past accomplishments of its various subcommittees are described.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660426
Harper H. Hull
The American Boat and Yacht Council was formed to supply the boat manufacturing industry with safety standards for pleasure craft. Tentative standards first developed by the Technical Members of the Council are widely disseminated throughout the industry for comment. Only after all comments and suggestions are resolved is the standard finally adopted. Adopted standards thus represent the best thinking of the majority of the boating industry. Standards are keyed to the safety of life at sea and the safety and durability of the vessels themselves.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660429
E. S. Terwilliger
The Yacht Safety Bureau is an independent, nonprofit, public service organization engaged only in testing for public safety in the boating field. The testing services are for end products only. Its object is to make certain that marine equipment measured for safe operation performs as intended. In order to accomplish this, the Bureau's safety evaluation program provides a reference base to which the measurement of a product can be related (safety testing standards), the means for accomplishing the measurement (safety testing), and the means for informing the public that the measurement has been met (product listing and labeling).
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660428
James E. Cunningham
Recommended standards for boat trailers are published annually by the Boating Industry Association. A brief description is given of current standards which relate to load capacity, trailer boat support, trailer couplings, safety chains, winch assembly, tire load capacities, trailer wheels and bearings, trailer brakes, trailer lighting, and trailer electrical systems.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660430
Robert Flagg
The need for and details of a program covering environmental testing of marine products under the most severe water and climatic conditions are described. As indicated in this paper, if a marine product survives the rigorous tests carried out by one testing company in the southern Florida waters, the chances of future problems involving breakdowns and costly warranty repairs by the manufacturer will be greatly reduced.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660433
Carl S. Larson, E. I. Radzimovsky
This paper deals with the study of the strength conditions of bolted assemblies subjected to various types of repeated loads. The loads considered are repeated axial loads, repeated bending loads, and repeated combined loads, which are composed of axial and bending loads. A rational equation of the strength of a bolted assembly is suggested in order to express the conditions that exist when such an assembly is subjected to conditions of combined dynamic loading.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660432
Samuel K. Clark, Jerald J. Cook
In this paper, the effects of fluctuating torque on loosening of a tightly seated bolt are investigated. Tests over a wide range of bolt stresses and loosening torques are reported and equipment developed for determination of such effects is described. It is shown that a definite functional relationship exists between the stress on a typical bolt, the oscillatory loosening torque that is applied, and the number of cycles before the bolt becomes loose. The effects of these relationships follow a clearly defined law, although they are, of course, influenced by a number of additional variables.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660435
Brooks Stevens
The development of the Excalibur SS automobile, a contemporary classic, is traced from the time of inspiration to the present. The author describes various design and engineering considerations involved in manufacturing these automobiles for limited production, and shows how design and engineering requirements have evolved with the advent of new materials, suppliers, and the like.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660442
John W. Sandford, George F. Fraser
Mission studies have indicated that a launch vehicle pay-load capability void exists between the Saturn IB and Saturn V vehicles. The S-II and S-IVB stages of the Saturn V were investigated to determine the feasibility of utilizing them to satisfy the capability void. To obtain low earth orbital payloads in the range of 75,000-150,000 lb, it is necessary to augment the S-II stage thrust. This paper discusses the application of Minuteman first-stage or Titan III-C type 120 in. strap-onsolid rocket motors to provide the additional thrust to the intermediate vehicle comprised of the S-II and S-IVB. Included is a definition of the candidate vehicle configurations utilizing these solid motors and a definition of the stage modifications. The payload performance and control characteristics of the intermediate vehicles are summarized.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660441
W. M. Shempp
The S-IVB must satisfy two different sets of vehicle constraints: 1) as a second stage for the Saturn IB launch vehicle, and 2) as a third stage with restart capability for the Saturn V launch vehicle. A comparison between these missions is presented. Since upper stages generally contribute more kinetic energy to the payload, they are more critical than lower stages from a performance tradeoff aspect. Initially, space launch vehicles were single-burn devices, with mission times measured in minutes. The current S-IVB mission time encompasses more than 6–1/2 hours, a significant portion of which is in a near-zero g environment. This operational requirement imposes severe demands on stage design. The resulting problem areas are identified, and their solutions are described. The primary and secondary technical objectives of stage missions are discussed in general.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660422
Gordon H. Dickman
Recruiting, training, and motivating marine law enforcement officers to effectively perform their mission is vital if results are to be achieved in boating safety. Since boating laws cover an extremely diverse field and by necessity are set forth in very broad language, the marine law enforcement officer must use considerable judgment and discretion in applying laws and regulations and in dealing with offenders. But above all, his work must be recognized by both the courts and the public as being an important adjunct to boating safety.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660421
James A. Hadley
The Federal Boating Act of 1958 provides for coordinated Federal-state recreational boating safety programs. Today 46 states have passed legislation dealing with recreational boating. However, many of the operating and equipment requirements vary distinctly from both the Federal requirements and those of neighboring states. Of the various solutions which have been proposed to alleviate this confusing situation, it would appear that the most sensible is the development of uniformity in boating laws, rules, and regulations. The necessary steps in order to accomplish such uniformity are outlined.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660420
Warren Bonn
In order to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in the small boat field and to insure that reasonable safety standards are being reflected in its recommended load and horsepower ratings, the Canadian Department of Transport (D.O.T.) and the Canadian boating industry jointly conduct performance and evaluation tests each year. The development of the D.O.T. system encompassing three horsepower curves for determining the horsepower of any boat is described.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660419
David Oliver
The Coast Guard approach to Federal safe boating legislation is both cautious and comprehensive. Its part in promoting safe boating, both through legislation and enforcement, is discussed, with emphasis on the continuing need for close liaison with state administrators, industry representatives, industry associations, marine trade groups, and of course the boating public.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660418
Joseph V. Day
ABSTRACT
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660417
Kenneth B. Champ
The avowed purpose of the U. S. Power Squadrons is to educate small boat users in safe boating practices and to inform participants in water activities on how to properly enjoy water sports and at the same time respect the rights of others. Over 350 local Squadrons situated across the country offer various courses at no charge to the public covering such diverse subjects as small boat handling, charts, piloting, rules of the road, and even celestial navigation. It is unfortunate that not enough persons are aware of this program, and of those who do register for classes, many do not complete the courses in which they enrolled.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660416
W. J. Webb
It is the responsibility of the boating industry to make certain that its marine products are designed and manufactured to operate safely and under almost all conceivable conditions. It is also the industry's responsibility to educate boat operators and the general public in common sense boating practices. However, in attempting to improve boating's safety record, it must be remembered that in the final analysis if the boat operator does not use good judgment or comply with the law, then all the engineering improvements, educational programs, and efficient law enforcement will not prevent boating accidents.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660399
Walter D. Noon, Gary L. Smith, Paul A. Bochnig
The evaluation of commercial vehicle brake system balance is a complex analytical task. Tractor-trailer combinations frequently include different brake designs on different axles, which have widely varying characteristics. In addition, variations in brake parameters such as pressure, response times, linings, and heat transfer under various operating conditions add to the complexity of analyzing the brake system. This paper describes a mathematical model of the vehicle brake system and a program for a digital computer to solve the mathematical expressions. Using the computer to simulate dynamic brake system operation, current designs can be evaluated rapidly for effectiveness and possible improvement, and future designs can be analyzed prior to expensive prototype fabrication.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660400
William C. Eaton, Ivan J. Schreur
The operation and installation of a brake proportioning valve for large commercial vehicles are discussed. Comments on areas of usefulness are included and test data presented. An appendix contains generalized equations pertaining to predicted vehicle performance.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660398
Robert J. Morse
Two means of making substantial improvements in brake balance are discussed. The first, the use of dynamic rather than static weights in braking power calculations has greatest value on loaded vehicles. Dynamic weights existing at 0.3 g deceleration are proposed as a standard. The second, load proportioned braking, is helpful on empty vehicles but must be used on all axles which have a substantial change in weight from the empty to the loaded condition. If used on only one unit of a combination vehicle, it may have a detrimental effect on brake balance.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660394
Hiroshi Naito, Moriyuki Taguchi
This paper describes aspects of YAMAHA 2 cycle, high speed, high output engines. Generally speaking, in order to obtain good results in developing engine performance, high delivery ratios and high thermal and mechanical efficiencies are essential. In addition to these, the most suitable cooling and lubricating systems must be employed. YAMAHA has developed a separate and automatic lubrication system for 2-cycle gasoline engines, which keeps YAMAHA engines well lubricated.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660391
G. R. Smith, D. R. Dunlop, D. M. Finch
This report describes equipment designed and built in the Motor Vehicle Devices Testing Facility of the California Highway Patrol, and used to increase laboratory capacity for testing of automotive signal flashers. The new durability test apparatus is capable of handling two or three terminal flashers in groups of 80 at one time, and uses two electronically regulated, solid state power supplies as sources of stable d-c power. The performance test apparatus makes it possible to obtain the operating characteristics of 10 flashers in quick succession through use of a switching control unit and a strip chart recorder.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660392
THOMAS K. BRICHFORD, JAMES W. MURRAY
Determining the actual usage and environment to which a turn signal flasher is exposed made it possible to design a laboratory test from which predictions could be made of flasher reliability as installed in a vehicle. A simplified reliability test plan was also devised for monitoring production flashers which permits valid conclusions to be reached by personnel not acquainted with statistics.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660388
Ricklef W. Shirk
The heater air flow rate is a function not only of the heater itself but also of the size and location of the heater system air inlets, the car body air outlets, and the body surface pressure at these inlets and outlets. Favorable pressure conditions generally exist at the typical top cowl heater air inlet; however, the aerodynamics of each particular vehicle should be studied to confirm the existence of these conditions. Little consideration has been given to body air outlet pressure conditions since body leakage paths have generally served as adequate air outlets; but, as body leakage is reduced, specific air outlets must be considered and a knowledge of aerodynamics is essential to the achieving of appropriately sized and appropriately located air outlets.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660387
Alex S. Tremulis
An analysis is presented of several existing land speed record cars and the aerodynamic drag characteristics involved in attaining the speed of sound. The importance of minimum profile area is discussed with the implication that the two wheel tandem principle presents the ultimate form for land speed record attempts achieving Mach I speeds.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660379
Louis H. Weinand
Conventional radial lip oil seals can be made more effective by utilizing helical grooving beneath the contact lip surface. Miniature hydrodynamic pumps so formed aid the radial lip seal in containing the oil by generating fluid forces opposite in direction to the leakage flow forces. This seal-shaft combination has been termed the Hydroseal. Four factorial experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of helix angle, groove depth, groove width, and number of grooves on sealing performance. The criterion used as a basis for selecting the optimum design were leakage, wear, hardening of the sealing surface, and pumping capacity. These data indicated that the best hydroseal design was one with three grooves, 0.0003 in. deep, 0.014 in. wide, having a helix angle of 45 deg.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660381
John M. Brown
The Sealometer is used for evaluating the performance of lip type oil seals and provides a dimensionless number derived from measuring the increase in temperature of a test shaft operating in a lip seal for a given time interval. With the Sealometer it is possible to study parameters that affect seal performance. As a quality control instrument, the machine provides accurate data for design. Sealometer evaluation offers a quick method of determining the life expectancy of a particular design for a particular application and eliminates the need for long life test programs.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660380
James D. Symons
The multitude of lip section designs and the continued major automotive warranty problem in the field of radial oil seals indicated that a more thorough knowledge of lip section design was necessary. Seven design factors were investigated by means of fractional factorial experimentation to determine the optimum level for each of the factors. The general effects of trim diameter, radial lip force, seal lip to case eccentricity, spring position, contact width, flex section, and material modulus, plus the interactions between these seven factors, were investigated. Leakage was measured as the response or dependent variable. A detailed drawing of the optimum lip section, derived from the results of tests which optimized on the main effects only, is given.

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