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Viewing 164461 to 164490 of 169946
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
W. M. HOLADAY
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
R. J. S. Pigott
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
C. M. McDOWELL
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
R. C. TRESEDER
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
H. M. GADEBUSCH
On the background of the wide speed and load variations to which high-speed Diesel engines are subjected, the author diagnoses the temperature conditions under which two different types of unburned fuel deposits may be formed. Solid carbon particles (“soot”) are predominantly the product of incomplete combustion at full throttle or high temperature operation while liquid polymerized fuel fractions are experienced in increasing amounts at the low combustion chamber temperatures synonymous with light loads and reduced speeds. Although some faulty engine conditions may be the cause of excessive soot formation, the author blames most deposits of this nature on the presence of high-boiling or even residual fractions and the poor burning quality of predominantly aromatic fuels. Large differences in the magnitude of low temperature fuel deposits were found by the author without much relation to the commonly used fuel inspection data. Howeven, when correlated with the chemical composition of the fuel, prevalence of paraffinic hydrocarbons and presence of a certain percentage of olefinic material appear to be of decidedly beneficial effect.
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
D. O. MOELLER, O. A. SANNE
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
R. F. GELLER
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
RALPH H. KRESS
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
NEWMAN A. HALL, RICHARD C. MULREADY
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
A. T. COLWELL, F. F. OFFNER, T. R. THOREN
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
FRANK B. SANDGREN
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
R. L. THOREN
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
W. L. McMILLEN
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
R. V. HUTCHINSON
This paper attempts to review things considered in design and improvement of valve gear, sometimes overlooked. Valve seat erosion and contributing influences are discussed briefly. Valve tip and rocker, and valve guide relationships for durability are mentioned, as are push rod peculiarities. When choice of follower is not limited to either flat or to large spherical radius, some rather interesting possibilities resulting from truly continuous lift-time relationships are described. Remarks on camshaft manufacture cover both grinding practice and gauging or lack of it. Finally, while not a part of valve gear, but as a portion of a valve gear component, the geometry of the customary integral oil pump gear, when sink-hobbed (cut without traverse) is briefly treated, and basic means of achieving good results from it are described. Valve springs are a speciality, and as such have not been mentioned; neither have valve rotators and self adjusting tappets.
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
D. W. RENTZEL, FREDRICK B. LEE
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
A. T. COLWELL
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
C. G. A. ROSEN
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
E. S. ROSS
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
KEITH TANTLINGER
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
J. J. BROEZE, C. STILLEBROER
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
R. M. SCHAEFER
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
LOREN E. LURA
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
J. W. SYMONDS
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
GEORGE W. WALKER
Technical Paper
1948-01-01
V. M. DREW

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