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Viewing 164461 to 164490 of 181981
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660131
E. T. Vincent
This report discusses possible improvements in compression ignition engine performance characteristics by greater utilization of the excess energy of exhaust gases of a typical engine. It also considers complications involved in this increased utilization as well as resulting differences in cost. Various direct and indirect methods of achieving results in these areas are suggested. The almost necessary use of variable geometry in the turbine unit if any real progress is to be made and the requirements involved in its use are also discussed.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660732
W. M. Douglass
The nacelle design for high bypass ratio turbofan engines installed on high subsonic aircraft is treated in this paper. The high bypass ratio turbofan, with its greater airflow per pound of thrust, presents different problems from those of existing turbojets and low bypass ratio turbofans. For example, there is some bypass ratio, depending upon aircraft payload range and engine geometry, above which the “ short duct” has advantage. The determination of this bypass ratio for a typical case is presented. For a bypass ratio 8 turbofan, the short duct nacelle has 3–4% better airplane direct operating costs than the long duct. With the short duct established as the preferred geometry for high bypass ratio turbofans, the problems of the air inlet, inlet cowl, fan nozzle, fan afterbody, and gas generator afterbody are discussed. Also, the thrust reverser, which affects the nacelle geometry, has been considered.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660344
John C. Basiletti, Edward F. Blackburne
In an effort to produce military tank engines with more power per cubic foot of bulk and more power per pound of weight, Continental Aviation and Engineering Corp. has applied the Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) piston to an already developed, aircooled diesel engine. In this engine design, compression ratio is automatically varied within the piston by the use of hydraulic circuitry employing a control valve operating in response to changes in peak combustion pressure. To accomplish the dual objectives of smaller volume and lighter weight, Continental is developing, under U.S. Army sponsorship, an engine that is currently capable of producing 1.3 gross horsepower per cubic inch of piston displacement. Weight, including all engine and transmission cooling equipment, is 2.3 lb/gross horsepower. This paper presents the developmental background and some interesting technical details of this project.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660225
Robert F. Cornish
Making use of the elastic deflection of an assembly to set tapered roller bearings with end play is a new application of a time proven method of setting bearings with preload. The technique offers a simple method for accurate bearing setting with a minimum of tools. It is adaptable to both loose and tight fitted bearing parts.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660740
Don D. Cummins
The Jacobs engine brake, introduced early in 1961, has enjoyed a success unequaled by any retarding device marketed in this country. Although the engine brake is a new device, it simply harnesses the built-in braking ability which is as old as Dr. Diesel's first engine. The operation, design, and performance of this engine brake are discussed in this paper. As of this writing, approximately 30,000 units are in operation in both on and off-highway applications.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660431
Theodore J. Budzynski, Robert J. Parker
This paper analyzes present-day heavy truck steering systems to provide a basis upon which to continue improvements. The discussion includes areas which mechanically and physiologically affect steering efforts and structural loads. Consideration is given to steering geometry, component design parameters, and human factors influential in the steering acceptability of a vehicle. This analysis is based on actual vehicle test data and a literature survey of related anthropometry.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660029
Rine Kruger, J. W. Barrick
Abstract Battery ratings set forth by the S.A.E. Standard are used to specify minimum charge and discharge characteristics and minimum life standards. Some deficiencies with present ratings are discussed as well as the requirements for a good battery rating. Factors such as temperature, current, state of charge, electrolyte concentration, and battery age must be considered in any rating. The development of performance equations as a new rating method is suggested to widen the scope of present measures of performance.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660474
James W. Winship
A review of factors affecting an engine piston design and its successful operation reveal the thin line existing between Art and Science. Piston language and basic terms are discussed and illustrated for engineers with limited knowledge of engine pistons. A review of fundamentals is outlined for engineers who daily face the increased demands for higher speeds and output from engines that are ever decreasing in size. A fresh evaluation of the basics will reveal the costs involved when these rules are ignored. All engine pistons discussed are aluminum alloy with and without various integrally cast ferrous inserts. Many points of interest are considered, including: lube oil control, wrist pin cracks, close fit and ring groove protectors versus high silicon alloys. Because of the individuality of engines and their pistons, definite answers are not proposed for general problems.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660080
Derwyn Severy, Harrison Brink
Auto-pedestrian accidents -- one of the most important factors in motor vehicle deaths and injuries -- were studied with the precise techniques of full-scale accident simulation. Thirty-eight anthropometric dummies, instrumented with triaxial accelerometers, were impacted under representative auto-pedestrian exposure conditions. Among the conditions under study were the pedestrian blow by the striking vehicle and the pedestrian's corresponding body gyrations, displacements and subsequent pavement contacts varying with the size and speed of the impacting vehicle; the portion of the front end contacting the pedestrian; the direction the pedestrian was facing when impacted; the pedestrian height, and his walking or standing postures. Other factors under study concerned the relationship that vehicle braking and special vehicle structures bear to auto-pedestrian injuries. Thirty special photographic devices provided coverage for data reduction and documentary film production.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660763
Algirdas L. Nasvytis
The multiroller friction drive has a very broad field of possible applications, especially where noise is a factor. At present, the drive offers a unique solution, which up until now was not possible, for ultra high rotating speed ranges. The drive is a new tool for investigation of ultra high speed surface velocities and ultra high load frequencies. The drive also offers accelerated testing for other rolling surface phenomena.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660019
Neal L. Dyste, Louis B. Peltier
This paper discusses the role of recuperators in gas turbine systems and emphasizes the use of compact matrix designs in providing efficient packaging and high utilization of available space. Problem areas encountered in recuperators for propulsion and power conversion engines are noted in terms of design, fabrication prices and materials. Economic factors are compared in terms of initial cost and operational savings for various gas turbine applications.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660756
W. Gross, A. W. Hussmann
The conventional methods of computing the main-bearing forces result only in a rough approximation of the actual bearing loads. The reasons for the deviations between measured and calculated loads are investigated. An improved computation method is proposed and its results are compared with measurement on two engines.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660150
Donald Friedman
Lunar and planetary programs have entered the surface exploration research phase. In this phase, considerable emphasis is needed on high mobility vehicle configurations, reliability and high efficiency, low weight electrochemical energy converters, and electric traction power systems. This research, in many cases, is applicable to solving future mobility problems on earth. Three areas of current lunar and terrestrial research are discussed and analyzed, and the correlative advantages to those working in both fields are highlighted. The three areas are; (1) high mobility vehicle configurations; (2) electrochemical energy converters; and (3) electric traction power systems.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660757
A. Stotter
This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation in the effectiveness of various cooling methods of pistons in internal combustion engines. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods are stressed and quantitative data are obtained for calculation and prediction of piston temperatures. The methods discussed are: no oil cooling, cooling from a pressure lubricated small end, jet cooling, and “cocktail shaker.”
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660599
Robert T. Larsen
Dynamic testing yields more realistic values for the spring rates of rubber mounts used in vibration isolation systems. Shore durometer, 20% load deflection, tensile modulus, and other static tests have generally shown little relation to the actual spring behavior under field conditions.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660340
Richard L. Keinath, Herbert G. Sood, William J. Polkinghorne
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660156
James T. Gray, Edward Dimitroff, Nelson T. Meckel, R. D. Quillian
This paper describes full-scale engine studies conducted to determine the feasibility and compatability of ammonia combustion in various systems. Briefly outlined is the spark-ignition investigation undertaken by the Army Laboratory to learn the potential and effect of ammonia as a fuel and to study the influence of engine variables on combustion. A study of compression-ignition performance was made to ascertain the ability of ammonia to be pumped in existing injection systems and various means of achieving ammonia combustion were explored. Conclusions drawn from these studies on the use of ammonia as a fuel are given.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660342
W. L. Weertman, R. J. Lechner
This paper covers the design and development of a family of engines used for closed circuit track competition and acceleration trail competition. In addition, a detuned version of the engine suitable for normal street and highway driving is described. All these engines share a hemispherical combustion chamber using push rod operated valves.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660578
K. W. Anderson
Narrow-row spacing (30, 20 and 15 inches) of corn and soybeans a newly developing farm practice, aimed at increasing yields, affects tractor design and usage. Problem areas include tires, rear wheel tread, rear axles and rear axle housings.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660126
M. R. McKellar
Abstract Pontiac's new overhead camshaft six cylinder Tempest engine utilizes a neoprene, glass fiber reinforced, timing belt for its camshaft drive. The successful application of this timing belt provides a quiet, reliable drive for the overhead camshaft. This engine incorporates for the first time hydraulically actuated zero valve lash compensation in an overhead camshaft valve mechanism. In its standard version, the new engine is equipped with a one barrel carburetor and uses regular fuel, while a four barrel premium fuel option is also offered. Increased engine performance, high rpm potential, economy of operation, good idle characteristics, smoothness and durability at high engine speeds, and exceptional ease of servicing have been achieved.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660363
G. M. Galster, J. S. Pigott
Spark plug heat range requirements, preignition limits, and ignition voltage requirements were investigated in several liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fueled engines. These tests show that ignition voltage requirements both for cold starting and for running are considerably higher than with gasoline. It is also shown that very cold running spark plugs are both undesirable and unnecessary with LPG fuels. Spark plug design can be utilized to reduce voltage requirements and to improve the overall performance of these engines. Projected core nose type spark plugs may offer additional performance benefits in LPG tractor engines.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660472
Frank H. Kliebhan
The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction to the analytical background that must be considered for successful crankshaft design. Techniques for calculating various forces imposed on crankshafts, as well as the formulas used in the calculations, are fully covered.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660749
Wilhelm Bosch
A new laboratory technique is described which permits visual display and easy evaluation of the discharge characteristics of any given fuel injection pump at random nozzle back-pressure. In contrast to former fuel rate indication devices, the instrumentation is basically simple and lends itself to accurate calibration. Discussed are the basic underlying theory, the dimensional requirements for the measuring apparatus proper, and practical and theoretical applications of the new method on fuel injection systems. In conformance with the original dissertation, metric dimensions are used throughout.
1966-02-01
Standard
J946_196602
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended as a guide to the use of radial lip type seals. It has been prepared from existing literature, which includes standards, specifications, and catalog data of both oil seal producers and users and includes generally accepted information available in one document to the users of oil seals.
1966-02-01
Standard
J684B_196602
This SAE Standard includes couplings, hitches, and safety chains used in conjunction with all types of trailers or towed vehicles whose Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) does not exceed 4540 kg (10 000 lb). This includes such types as utility, boat, camping, travel, and special purpose trailers which are normally towed by conventional passenger cars, light-duty commercial vehicles, light trucks, and multipurpose passenger vehicles. This document is intended primarily for ball-and-socket type of couplings and hitches. It should not be construed as a limitation to this type alone but should apply where appropriate to ring-and-pintle, clevis-and-pin, or any other draft means designed to serve this purpose.
1966-01-20
Standard
AS889
This standard provides a listing of the spark plug models which have been found suitable as calibration spark plugs for use in the SAE 17.6 cu in. spark-plug-rating engine (AS 840).
1966-01-10
Technical Paper
660122
B. J. Ludwig
The use of computers in the Quality Control Department of an automotive assembly plant is described. The concept of Real Time reporting is detailed; information on production problems affecting quality is relayed to appropriate areas for corrective action. All information is then processed daily to provide a 5-Day Summary Report on each quality variation. Computers are also used to assess repair time and to compare results of service complaints with similar conditions at each assembly plant.
1966-01-01
Standard
AMS4155B
SUPERSEDING SPECIFICATION: The requirements of this specifications are embodied in the latest issue of AMS 4150, ALUMINUM ALLOY EXTRUSIONS (6061-T6). The requirements of the latest issue of AMS 4150 shall be fulfilled whenever reference is made to this specification.
1966-01-01
Standard
AMS4091A
SUPERSEDING SPECIFICATION: The requirements of this specification are embodied in the latest of AMS 4081, ALUMINUM ALLOY TUBING, HYDRAULIC (6061-T4). The requirements of the latest issue of AMS 4081 shall be fulfilled whenever reference is made to this specification.

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