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Viewing 164461 to 164490 of 173790
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570269
M. R. ZOFFEL, ROBERT W. OLIN
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570335
E. W. WRIGHT, J. R. COWLES
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570268
J. A. MILLER, C. K. PARKER
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570334
DAVID H. BAKER
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570271
R. T. VanDERVEER, J. D. JENKS, R. L. DENNIS
Summary A system of totalizing the hydrocarbon emission from an automobile during operation has been developed and evaluated. The system involves the use of multiplying potentiometers to obtain the product of cubic feet per minute of exhaust and exhaust hydrocarbon concentration. The product (CFM of hydrocarbon) is integrated electronically and totalized during vehicle operation as the accumulated weight of hydrocarbons emitted.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570333
F. S. DRISCOLL
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570270
NICHOLAS FODOR
Summary: The paper contains the fundamental evaluation of air and water cooling of engines. The problems of air-cooling in general and those of the component parts are explained in detail. The combustion process is described and the special problems arising from it are discussed. The construction of the air-cooled M.W.M. engines are described and illustrated. This paper is a free translation of an article published by Direktor Joseph Bischel of M.W.M. in 1956 in the M.W.M. magazine. Sections of the paper are based on Dr. Ing. Hans. L. Hockel's article entitled “The M.W.M. Constant Pressure Gombustion System For High Speed Diesel Engines”. Permission for publishing this paper is gratefully acknowledged to the MOTOREN-WERKE MANNHEIM A.G.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570332
Leonard Raymond
Hypoid axles are the most heavily loaded and critical components of a car or truck. It takes the combined efforts of the builder, the lubricant supplier and the user to assure long axle life and trouble-free performance. The responsibilities of the builder for proper design, manufacture, installation and service; of the lubricant supplier for continued improvement in gear-lubricant quality and performance; and of the user for reasonable care in operation and maintenance are covered. A look at possible future developments is included.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570265
R. M. SCHAEFER
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570331
KENNETH ROBINSON
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570264
R. H. BARRETT
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570330
HENDRIE GRANT
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570267
LEONARD RAYMOND
Higher horsepower and increased low-gear ratio in automatic transmissions have resulted in several-fold increases in axle gear loading in both passenger cars and commercial vehicles. Lubricants and lubrication have become a limiting factor in axle performance, and single-purpose factory fill lubricants and the older multipurpose lubricants have not kept pace with the new requirements. Extensive research by lubricant and additive manufacturers has resulted in a new type of multipurpose gear lubricant possessing the anti-scoring advantages of active-sulphur-type lubricants and the desirable anti-wear and low friction characteristics of more inactive type products. The performance of the new type gear lubricants has been proven in extensive tests in different types of vehicles under a variety of severe operating conditions. New axle test methods have been developed for incorporation in an upgraded version of Specification MIL-L-2105.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570329
L. J. LECHTENBERG
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570266
THOMAS BACKUS, C. M. Perkins
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570328
B. J. Smith
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570261
JAMES C. HUGHES
SUMMARY Compression ratios ranging from 4:1 to 16:1 have been investigated in a special single-cylinder engine, as have quench or squish areas from 0 to 50 per cent piston coverage at each compression ratio. The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: 1. As compression ratios are increased, gains are subject to the law of diminishing returns. This is true of brake horsepower, as well as indicated power and thermal efficiency. At higher compression ratios, the only thing still increasing rapidly is the fuel antiknock requirement. 2. Quench area, in the range investigated, had no effect on power or thermal efficiency. 3. Quench area does have large and important effects on fuel antiknock requirements and engine severity. Fuel sensitivity, under certain conditions, can be a real asset instead of a liability. 4.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570327
G. F. MACFARLANE
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570326
W.A. BONVALLET
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570260
HAROLD F. WOOD
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570263
WINFIELD H. ARATA
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570325
F. S. ALTMAN
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570324
K. A. BEIER
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570257
The John Deere Waterloo Tractor Works, as manufacturers of farm tractors, does not manufacture oil seals. We rely on the manufacturers of oil seals for design assistance. After establishing the initial design, laboratory and field tests are required for verification. One of the seal applications is on the crankshaft which must keep crankcase and transmission lubricants separated. Reliability and long life are imperative. Alertness as to the effect of detail changes on seal life is necessary to maintain long service life. The front wheel bearing seals may be subjected to submersion in water and mud. Packing, lip and face type seals have been tested with the face type proving the most rugged, although the most costly of the three types. A problem of design and space which was encountered in a hydraulic pump was overcome by design changes in the seal and in the pump. Constant vigilance on assembly methods and tool maintenance is a requirement to keep quality level high.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570323
ARTHUR C. JOHNSON
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570256
AHTHOHY W. LEVIER
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570322
K. H. GIBSON
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570259
C. R. LEWIS
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570321
E. R. STERNBERG

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