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Viewing 164461 to 164490 of 173429
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560210
K. A. DIGNEY
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560207
A. P. Belmonte
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560208
MERRILL C. HORINE
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560206
JOHN HUMBER
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560203
E. S. CHEANEY
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560204
DONALD R. BUERSCHINGER
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560184
R. W. WANTIN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560186
James H. Booth
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560183
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560185
D. F. LEMAUX
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560180
O. D. DILLMAN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560179
R. J. DeGRAY
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560182
V. L. SCHATZ, A. L. WYNN, R. W. REMKE
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560192
LUDVIG PETERSEN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560191
COLONEL CLAUDE W. SMITH
The author presents activities of the first twelve months, ending 1 November 1955, of the service test, including objectives and programmed evaluations. Equipment being tested, training considerations and specific tests performed are described. The Allison YT-56-A3 engine and Aeroproducts Turbine Propeller combination installed on a CV 340 aircraft has been the primary test configuration during the period reported, thus the accumulated data presented mainly concerns the performance of this power plant.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560194
A. A. DACH
True value of new chassis and engine lubricants can only be determined by tests under actual operating and maintenance conditions. Factors other than just the quality and performance of the lubricant, should be considered before any extension of the lubrication interval is attempted. However, under certain conditions, appreciable extension of the interval is possible with the use of a molybdenum disulfide grease. In limited tests, using an SAE 30, MTL-0-2104 oil as the reference, a 20W-40 oil gave greater fuel and oil economy whereas an SAE 30, Series 2 oil gave less fuel and greater oil economy. Additional tests for verification and determination of effects upon stretching out the PM interval are needed.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560193
C. J. FORD, L. U. G. NILSSON
The Goodyear Rolligon tire development program has partially explored a field of extremely low pressure tires and the application of these tires to vehicles as a means of extending vehicular mobility. The tire characteristics explored have included: Low ground bearing pressures. Flexible tire surface and side wall. Deflection at operating loads and pressures. Low skin stresses in tire surface. The program has also included the exploration of vehicle design concepts such as: Utilization of walking beam. Integral central inflation system. Axle and peripheral drive and loading. All wheel drive. Field testing indicates that increased tired vehicle mobility has been achieved.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560188
JOHN PRESTON, JEROME MOGUL, G. K. FLOROFF
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560187
E. B. OGDEN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560190
A. J. CHENEY, W. B. HAPPOLDT, K. G. SWAYNE
Both “Zytel” nylon resin and “Teflon” tetrafluoro-ethylene resin are being used extensively as bearing materials. Most of these applications have been developed independently and no attempt has been made to collect performance data in order to put future design on a firm basis. Typical data on dry or partially lubricated bearings have been collected from a variety of sources. Work in our laboratories on lubricated bearings made of “Zytel” are reported for the first time. In addition, physical properties of these materials are described. With these properties and the bearing work done to date, it is believed that the selection of the material and the design of bearings can be done with greater accuracy.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560189
J. L. LaMARCA, J. L. McCABE
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560167
J. B. STEVENS
DIGEST A description of the application of Axial Face Seals to Aircraft Gas Turbine Main Shaft Bearings, Gear Boxes or Accessory Pads and Accessories; their limitations with respect to sealing media, temperatures, pressures and rubbing surface speeds; the influence of these factors on the selection of materials of construction. A statement of the current status of the art and projected future requirements.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560168
RICHARD V. BLAIR
The Controlled Gap Seal consists of a carbon sealing ring with a steel retaining ring shrink fitted on the outside diameter, two steel mating rings, a spacer ring, and an outer shell. In operation under ideal conditions there is a pressure differential across the seal with the air side pressure being higher than the oil side. This differential prevents oil leakage and holds the carbon sealing ring against the oil side mating ring while the shaft turns freely within the sealing ring. The Controlled Gap Seal will operate with unlimited axial movement, is of rugged construction and will give long life and very low heat generation. It is good for high temperature operation since there are no rubber or plastic materials used.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560169
J. W. PENNINGTON, T. C. KUCHLER, E. J. TASCHENBERG
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560170
ROBERT L. JOHNSON, MAX A. SWIKERT, JOHN M. BAILEY
Abstract Wear studies were made to show the effects on performance of temperature, type of mating materials, and minor composition changes in typical carbon seal materials. Most data were obtained at a sliding velocity of 10,000 feet per minute, a load of 1000 grams on a 3/16 inch radius specimen and with temperatures to 700 F. Wear of carbon materials increased rapidly with higher temperatures. The effect of temperature on wear was reduced by use of chromium plate as the mating surface rather than stainless steel or tool steel. In general, impregnations of carbon had little effect on wear compared with effect of the mating material.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560164
J. M. CHANDLER, O. ENOCH
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560166
GILBERT C. BARNES, EARLE A. RYDER
Summary: The heavily loaded thrust bearing in aircraft turbines must be 100% reliable, which requires a different philosophy from that on which catalog ratings are based, namely, 10% of failures. Principal problems are: 1) to raise the minimum life of bearings regardless of the wide spread between minimum and maximum, and 2) to raise the permissible operating temperature. Metallurgical improvements offer the best possibilities for gain in 1 and 2 above. Other factors such as geometry, finish, and dimensional accuracy are helpful in category 1 but do not promise large gains.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560175
C. W. LINCOLN
Abstract As the internal combustion engine began to replace the horse, the Ackermann non-turning front axle came into its own. With increasing front-end loads, reducing gears replaced simple tiller connections between hands of driver and front wheels. The story of manual steering gears is that of continued engineering effort to increase efficiency within the gear-box, to hold down steering effort and amount of “wheeling” required, as loads have gone up and tire pressures down. In the last few years, power steering for passenger cars has been introduced. At the start a luxury, it is fast becoming a necessity.

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