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Viewing 169981 to 170010 of 185641
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640080
J. A. SEIDL
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640089
Roy Balogh
Utility winches are reliable and durable pieces of equipment. Their installation on the truck chassis frame is not difficult to accomplish. However, as pure mechanical drives become more complex, the problem of proper location and configuration is intensified. In this connection, hydraulic motor drives offer improved flexibility and reduced installation problems at the sacrifice of some power loss. Although considerable progress has been made in the technical development and application of constant load utility winches and hydraulic drive installations, important advances are still to be realized, especially with regard to achieving higher efficiency and more compact design units.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640058
J. E. Fischler
Abstract This paper discusses the design considerations for supersonic transport aircraft of four types-one with a variable sweep wing and three with fixed wings. Two of the fixed wing types have canards, and one has an aft tail. The aerothermoelastic effects of sweep angle, wing thickness, “lg” working stress, and materials are shown. Some of the general design considerations discussed are: probability predictions of survival of a major structural component; important fatigue spectrum considerations; estimations of the magnitude of creep from a 30,000 hr SST spectrum.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640059
C. A. Hall, S. M. Collegeman, J. B. Retzloff
Abstract This paper covers the development of single cylinder engine tests for evaluating the new additive-type oils for aircraft piston engines. These procedures utilize the CLR Oil Test Engine. One procedure is designed to evaluate the high temperature oxidation stability of these oils, while the other measures their low temperature sludge dispersancy qualities.* *Both test methods are incorporated in the new Military Specification MIL-L-22851 (Wep), “Lubricating Oil, Aircraft Reciprocating Engine (ashless dispersant)” used for the procurement of the new additive type oils. The two procedures appear to be quite repeatable, and thus superior to any previous single cylinder engine tests used for evaluating aircraft engine oils. They were developed by Ethyl Corp. in a study sponsored by the Bureau of Naval Weapons of the U.S. Navy.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640072
R. L. Lickley, J. Crampton
Recognition of the Anglo-American co-operation that is the foundation of this project. Description of the aeroplane and its vectored thrust engine. The historical background and highlights in the flight development programme. The present state of the art in this project and the potential operational capabilities of the aircraft. Reference to the P.1127 Tripartite Military Evaluation Squadron to be formed in England early in 1965.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640074
W. R. Morgan, H. C. True, H. B. Starkey
The XV-5A lift fan airplane is an Army (TRECOM) sponsored V/STOL research program and is designed to demonstrate the performance of a V/STOL gas coupled, lift fan system and its compatibility with a high subsonic speed aircraft. This paper summarizes the aircraft and propulsion system design and manufacture. Performance characteristics and design features along with the status of the program are also presented.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640098
K. P. KIRCHOFF, J. E. VINCENTY
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640102
E. T. MABLEY
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640104
Richard C. Teasel, James F. Hoffman
This survey of ignition systems and starting performance was conducted in 400 communities in the United States and Canada. Results showed poor maintenance by the average motorist. Over a third of all vehicles tested had ignition systems with low output and 60% needed spark plug service or replacement. Approximately one-fourth of all motorists reported hard starting. Only 60% intended to have a tune-up; only 40% actually had it. Tune-ups usually consisted only of spark plug servicing. This survey indicates rather conclusively the great need to make motorists aware of the value of periodic maintenance.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640107
D. O. Gunson
The safety concepts applicable to the design of the primary systems for the new generation high performance business aircraft are presented and discussed. The systems designs employed in the Lockheed JetStar are used as examples of how these concepts are applied to achieve the high level of operational safety demanded by business operators.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640093
B. S. Seltenreich
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640094
D. J. Nolan
With the growth of the number of privately owned and operated business aircraft fleets, it is essential that maximum safety practices and a working operating philosophy be clearly developed and practiced. This paper describes how a sound maintenance philosophy can be achieved. The factors considered in the development of such a policy include: machine load concept; total fleet operational parameters, which consist of excess demand, system capacity, maintenance level, convenience, and system utility; typical monthly analysis; and division of maintenance effort, which includes periodic inspection, engine changes, fleet modifications, line maintenance, shop work, and unpredicted requirements.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640095
Robert J. Hixson
Development and growth of the use of aircraft in business and industry attests the increasing value of their operation in the eyes of management. The responsibility for and the organization of a typical air transportation department follows a broad pattern, with many similarities and differences when compared to airline operation. The techniques of operation and training have resulted in an outstanding record of safety and efficiency, and have made the business aircraft a real tool of industry.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640096
Mark H. Smith, Harry P. Schmidt
The general procedure followed in the rational selection of business aircraft involves the primary steps of: determining company travel requirements, examining aircraft characteristics, and evaluating and making integrated decisions. The nature of the factors involved and their interrelationships are discussed and illustrated with actual case studies. Employment of the methodology outlined by capable technical analysts enables selection of the best aircraft with confidence and accuracy.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640016
Carl W. Schwabenlender
Abstract The classical methods of deflection analysis are finding more application to complex automotive chassis frame structures. Much too time consuming for manual application, they are now coming into more widespread use with the aid of high-speed computers. This paper describes a computerized deflection analysis for complete truck frames under the cases of torsion and flexure. The rapid, accurate analysis permits investigation of more design problems resulting in the eventual production of more efficient frame structures.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640005
Russell T. Miller
Abstract Ultrasonic cleaning methods can result in lower cost, safer handling methods, and higher product reliability. This paper describes types and levels of contamination, and various cleaning methods, as well as the equipment needed for ultrasonic cleaning. A comparison of cost is also made.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640034
F. S. Snyder
Abstract Piper Aircraft's Development Center at Vero Beach, Florida, has combined a background of aircraft experience with a background of experience in fiberglas reinforced plastics in a venture that has yielded the first all fiberglas airplane. The past four years of experience with reinforced plastic primary aircraft structures have been beset with many interesting experiences which bridged the gap between exploratory planning and an aircraft that flew on April 30, 1962. Substantial progress has been made in the fields of plastic molding equipment, processes, and fiberglas aircraft design.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640033
W. G. Cichowski
Abstract The Proving Ground Section of General Motors Corp. has installed, and is using, a new fullscale impact machine for simulating vehicle crash conditions. The device is unique in the automotive industry having been provided with the capacity for the indoor testing of complete vehicle structures to an acceleration of 40 g. Vehicle components can be subjected to even higher accelerations. The machine is also unique in that the test vehicle or component is subjected to an acceleration pulse rather than the equivalent deceleration shock. The installation has been equipped with modern instrumentation for precise recording of test conditions. This includes high level illumination for the high speed photographic coverage.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640020
Scott Flower
Abstract The paper outlines some considerations for design engineers concerning the handling qualities of commercial supersonic transport aircraft, as well as a review of some more important stability requirements. It concludes with a recommended test for obtaining the flight handling qualities required for airline operation, which will assure the meeting of the economic demands of the business.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640050
Kent B. Kelly, Harry J. Holcombe
Abstract A discussion of basic vehicle aerodynamics for use by body engineers is presented. Importance of aerodynamics to total vehicle performance is indicated. Aerodynamic drag, internal flow requirements, external flow patterns, and aerodynamic noise are discussed. Typical static pressures for different body shapes and different conditions of wind are given. Additional source information on vehicle aerodynamics is included.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640046
P. A. Peffer
Abstract This paper discusses the physical properties of ethylene-propylene terpolymers and suggests areas of probable use in the automotive field. Analysis of its physical properties and the economics of compounding and manufacturing indicate that Nordel* offers solutions to many of the problems encountered in automotive rubber products. Evaluation of weatherstripping, channels, and seals promises wide applicability in body sealing applications, and testing also indicates uses in chassis and underhood parts. Analysis of dynamic properties makes it an excellent candidate as a vibration isolator over the range of temperatures and frequencies of importance in automotive engine and body mounting.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640049
M. G. Bekker
Abstract This paper describes methods, based on applied mechanics and simplified operational analysis, for the evaluation of various vehicle concepts considered feasible for lunar surface exploration, and shows processes through which means of locomotion may be optimized. Although little is known of the physico-geometrical properties of the lunar surface which relate to vehicle mobility, by assuming a plausible spectrum of properties, valuable preliminary information can be derived with respect to the probable effectiveness of various feasible lunar vehicle concepts. Wheeled, tracked, screw-propelled, and walking vehicles are analyzed and their probable performances compared. Indications at the present time are that wheeled vehicles may probably best suit the purpose of lunar exploration.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640037
Carroll W. Boyce
Abstract An appraisal of the advantages of integrating truck and bus maintenance in a vehicle fleet maintenance program is presented. Basically, reliability and cost are the major considerations in any fleet program. Evidence is presented indicating that generally bus maintenance shops are better equipped, have better trained mechanics, utilize an effective preventive maintenance program, and have an optimum balance between maintenance cost and road failure cost. Generally speaking, bus repair shops can be utilized to the mutual advantage of truck and bus operators by using spare capacity of bus shops and thus eliminating this responsibility from truck operators.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640055
L. P. Greene, E. Bonner
Abstract Influences on design of the performance requirements of various mission segments are indicated, based in part on experience gained in the XB-70 program. In particular, the requirements that size the powerplant and wing are discussed. Various operational and emergency aspects are examined in order to define their severity and possible procedures and systems to cope with them. It is shown that performance requirements will exert great pressure toward incorporation of variable geometry features in the supersonic transport configuration.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640054
Calvin S. Yoran
Abstract The newest class of synthetic rubbers, the ethylenepropylene rubbers, abbreviated to EPR, offer improved ozone and oxidation resistance which it is believed will show advantages in many automotive weathersealing applications at costs equal or less than currently used rubbers. Other applications foreseen for these rubbers are sponge trim padding, armrest pads, and windlace, electrical wiring, hose, floor mats, grommets, and bumpers.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640053
B. T. Andren, J. J. Prendergast
Abstract The Taunus has been designed to meet the market demand for a car sized midway between the smallest and average sized European car, one that would provide exceptionally low cost of operation and rider comfort. The design described here had as us objectives low weight, low initial cost, superior performance and handling characteristics, comfortable seating and riding qualities, and ample luggage space. Tests show that the manufacturer has not fallen short of any of these objectives.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640051
W. H. Korff
Abstract Aerodynamic streamlining is assuming greater importance with our sustained driving speeds on new expressways. Benefits of streamlining include reduced wind noise, reduced lift and better stability, improved acceleration at passing speeds, higher cruising and top speeds, better fuel economy, and reduced initial costs. Basic principles of aerodynamics for automobiles are presented. Application of these principles are discussed and depicted for different types of automobiles and a tractor-trailer unit. Tables, formulas, and examples are included. Trends show aerodynamics as a factor of increasing importance for the automobile. It is suggested that a joint training program be initiated for body engineers and aerodynamicists with classroom studies based on detail design problems.
HISTORICAL
1964-01-01
Standard
AMS3157
CANCELLATION NOTICE This specification has been declared "CANCELLED " by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of January 2009 and has been superseded by AMS2644. The requirements of the latest issue of AMS2644 shall be fulfilled whenever reference is made to the cancelled AMS3157. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Index of Aerospace Material Specifications, noting that it has been superseded by AMS2644.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640559
P. B. Crosby
This paper describes the conception, implementation, functioning, and results of the Pershing weapon system quality control program. The weapon system has been operational since June 1962, so it is a fairly complete story. The most important lesson of the quality program was that people will perform to the tolerance level of management, and that you can get people to aspire to, and achieve in large measure, a goal of Zero Defects through proper motivation.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640414
George J. Huebner
This paper outlines the background of gas turbine research at Chrysler and describes briefly the powerplants which were developed prior to the current engine. It presents a review of the factors involved in the selection of the present engine cycle, as well as various considerations and results pertaining to powerplant and vehicle performance. A short description of the Chrysler Corporation turbine car is also given in the paper.

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