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Viewing 169981 to 170010 of 183949
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620100
W. O. ROBBINS, L. L. BEAHAM
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620102
J. R. Doidge, C. W. Cline
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620097
D. M. Adams
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620099
L. J. LaDouceur
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620067
William K. Steinhagen, Donald C. Unger
Although the field of automotive air conditioning is relatively new, it has enjoyed rapid growth. This expanding market, together with less available space in the engine compartment, has created a need for an air conditioning compressor of smaller size and increased capacity. This paper describes the preliminary design and development problems of a six cylinder axial swashplate compressor. The unit has a displacement of 15 cubic inches per revolution, and weighs 23 lbs. The production development of this device is described in two companion papers, “Production Design and Development of 1962 Frigidaire Automotive Compressor and Clutch.” by Messrs. J. Murphy and R. Mantey and “System Design and Development of 1962 GM/Harrison Automotive Air Conditioning.” by Mr. W. H. Jackson.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620069
James L. Dooley, Allan F. Bell
The history of steam cars dates back to the early 19th century. McCulloch Corp., looking for a superior automotive propulsion system, applied modern engineering techniques and latest methods and material in furthering the Paxton steam car development. An outline of the technical features of early steam cars is included. In the study of the vapor cycles, a standard vapor-cycle with stress on high pressure and high temperature to reduce size and improve efficiency was deemed best. Though steam car virtues such as high performance, fuel economy, and low noise level are readily apparent, the development of the internal combustion engine is so far advanced that any newcomer will require a tremendous development effort.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620064
Eugene F. Schneider
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620066
Walter G. Patton
The phenomenal success of the small car is leading to many engineering changes in the automobile industry. It has brought increased emphasis on weight reduction on both small and full-size cars. Improving reliability and designing to eliminate grease fittings have also become important objectives.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620078
W. W. Fredericks
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620074
Robert S. Ames, J. Byron Jones, Florence R. Meyer
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620075
C. M. Scholfield
This paper discusses rear suspension isolation requirements of leaf spring and coil spring suspensions, covering in the latter both body frame separate and body frame integral designs. In the transition from a leaf spring to a coil spring suspension and further to the coil suspension of an integral body and frame structure, isolation element sizes have increased. They have introduced problems in handling and shake control due to increased flexibility, and in ride and noise isolation resulting from insufficient flexibility. The resultant element design is thus a compromise, such as that covered here through the development of the Oldsmobile suspensions of the past few years.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620137
J. P. Thornton
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620123
George R. Gerhard
The automotive industry demands high quality products at minimum cost from its suppliers. Through utilization of beta-radiation thickness gages, materials used by the industry can be processed at mass production operating speeds while maintaining quality. The system consists of a radioisotope source to emit beta particles, detector to detect radiation, and a means of presenting detected radiation on a visual indicator. In the tire industry use of beta-gage allows measurement of coated tire fabric to within 1% of actual weight during production. By use of radiation measurement and control techniques, similar product uniformity can be achieved by plastics, metals, and paper industries. American industry realizes savings of hundreds of thousands of dollars each year through use of beta-radiation techniques.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620121
R. D. Kopa, R. G. Jewell, R. V. Spangler
The effect of exhaust gas recirculation on the wear of automobile engine piston rings was investigated by means of the radioactive isotope tracing method. The experiments were performed on a test facility especially designed for lubricating oils, fuels and additives, for their effect on piston ring wear. The piston ring wear rate was recorded during a series of experiments at different engine operating conditions and various amounts of exhaust gas recycling. At the same time, all engine parameters were recorded and the brake specific fuel consumption determined. The exhaust gas was analyzed for the nitrogen oxides content. When 12% of exhaust gas was recycled into the inlet manifold the following results were obtained: 1. A 90% reduction of ring wear at a steady state operation. 2. A 50% reduction of ring wear when the engine was operated on a simulated traffic pattern. 3. A 60–80% reduction in nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gas. 4.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620119
James M. Chandler
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620149
D. M. Severy, J. H. Mathewson, A. W. Siegel
Engineering methodology and research techniques, applied to 12 intersection-type automobile collision experiments, provided data on four speeds of impact and on three positions of impact. Anthropometric dummy motorists provide collision force and kinematic data for several conditions of restraint. Advanced photographic equipment identify new approaches to solution of the motorist collision injury problem.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620147
Irvin E. Poston
Plastics tooling has come of age and has proved itself in prototype and short run production. Plastics tooling has been used successfully by the sheet metal and foundry industries to reduce tooling time, cost, and weight. Plastic prototype parts can be produced easily to simulate production parts for design evaluation, and plastic tools and dies can be used for initially producing actual parts. New plastic formulations and new fabrication techniques insure an optimistic future for the use of plastics in tooling.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620146
By: J. J. Moran, J. R. Mihalisin
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620139
James W. Greig, Owen H. Pelham
The subject is presented in two parts: the first introduces our experience in adapting this material, and shows some examples of product applications. The second part shows that some progress has been made in our understanding of the behavior of one particular polyolefin. Because of the excellent properties offered by these materials, their economic advantages and adaptability to already existing processes of manufacture, they have gained rapid and widespread interest.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620104
W. C. Hitt, Ross D. McKown
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620103
H. F. Osterman
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620118
Leonard Raymond
The paper discusses the types of smog, the differences between London pariculate and Los Angeles photo-chemical smog, the Los Angeles County regulations and the California State laws on exhaust and crankcase control devices; It describes briefly how exhaust contaminants and crankcase emissions can be reduced and the cost of devices. Toxicity aspects, including the work of the U. S. Public Health Service are discussed; The individual and cooperative activities of the oil industry in minimizing air pollution and the research efforts to find sound technical solutions are described. The paper concludes with comments on future trends and the tremendous challenge to various technologies.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620112
Charles S. Chapman
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620117
M. E. St. AUBIN
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620111
E. C. Beck, W. VanDam, C. N. DeBruin
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620234
Cecil Hayes
The object of this paper is to give to American automobile engineers some indications of the trend of engineering designs adopted in the latest British and European passenger cars, and of the recent developments incorporated in them. The special items dealt with include engines, transmissions, brakes, and suspensions, as well as other features. It is felt that a critical period has been reached in connection with the more widespread adoption of automatic transmissions and disc brakes on British and European cars, and this position is reviewed in some detail.

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