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Viewing 169981 to 170010 of 182504
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600233
R. M. Schirmer, L. A. McReynolds, J. A. Daley
THE EFFECT of monocyclic versus polycyclic aromatic components, in JP-5 fuels having the same ASTM Smoke Points, on total flame radiant energy was investigated. The performance of research combustors and a J79 aircraft gas turbine engine single combustor operated at low (atmospheric) pressure showed that variations in aromatic type or content within the present JP-5 specification have no significant effect on flame radiation. The performance of research combustors and a J57 aircraft gas turbine engine single combustor operated at high (5-15 atm) pressure showed that polycyclic aromatic fuel blends burn with higher flame emissivities than monocyclic aromatic fuel blends of comparable ASTM Smoke Point. Radiant heating of metal parts was shown to be a function of their location in the combustor because quenched combustion products can effectively absorb flame radiation.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600068
Gregory Flynn, Worth H. Percival, F. Earl Heffner
THIS PAPER discusses the Stirling thermal enging from four points of view: 1. The ideal, thermodynamic point of view, showing the inherent potentialities of the ideal Stirling cycle in comparison to the basic cycles of other engines. 2. The physical engine and its method of operation with respect to the ideal cycle and the limitations of practical mechanics. 3. Performance data from the first modern Stirling engines ever operated in the United States, evaluating the relationship between the new engine and other more familiar engines of similar sizes. This comparative discussion serves to demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of the Stirling engine and to indicate its proper place in the 1960 family of prime movers. 4. A look backward into the century of history behind the modern engine pointing out significant milestones in the engine's development.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600480
A. H. Esper
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600112
Combustion characteristics of pure hydrocarbons and refinery-type fuel components have been investigated as part of a broad-scope fuel program now in progress at the Ordnance Fuels and Lubricants Research Laboratory. The CFR and CLR diesel engines were used for this investigation and multicylinder verification of the data was obtained with a GM 3-71 engine. Results obtained with about 50 pure hydrocarbons illustrated the importance of molecular structure on compression ignition combustion. Through use of the laboratory engines, under conditions discussed in this paper, cetane number was shown to be the most important property for predicting relative combustion performance of all types of fuel components. Ignition delay correlated well with cetane number, but rates of pressure rise and maximum combustion pressures to some extent, depended, upon the specific engine combustion system involved.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600028
H. J. McLean, H. Vitt
THE CONCEPT of an electric motor mounted inside the rim of a large wheel provides several advantages: flexibility, weight and cost reductions, and adaptability to established operating and maintenance patterns. A heavy-duty traction motor drive has been designed that eliminates the need for mechanical drive lines, differentials, and hydraulic torque converters. This paper describes the gear train, lubrication system, brakes, and ventilation of such a drive. Also discussed is the engine-generator set for an electric wheel motor.*
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600228
PAUL IRICK
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600151
P. E. CARY, E. O. MAGNUS, A. S. JAMESON
Aqueous solutions of polyvinyl alcohol were studied and compared with water and oil as quenchants using various diameter medium and high carbon steel rounds, and “C” shaped specimens made from high carbon steel. Four degrees of quenchant agitation were produced by the use of different quenching fixtures. It is shown that an aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol in a concentration by weight of 0,15 percent has a cooling ability between that of water and oil. It was founds however, that polyvinyl alcohol solutions are more sensitive to a change in quenchant agitation than is water.
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600029
P. C. Mortenson
THE HYDROSTATIC TRANSMISSION offers optimum performance characteristics — including smooth control of shaft speed, reversibility, high efficiency, precise control of vehicle speed and travel, rapid acceleration and deceleration, and flexibility of installation. However, these advantages are offset by several disadvantages — noise, the requirement for precision-type materials, weight and bulk, and, more important, high cost. The author believes that the hydrostatic transmission is the answer to exact transmission performance requirements. As such demand increases, manufacturers will be able to solve the more serious problems of this transmission.*
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600448
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600146
R. E. SAUZEDDE
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600223
TED FINKELSTEIN
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600267
JOHN D. CLARK
1960-01-01
Technical Paper
600222
TED FINKELSTEIN
SUMMARY Schmidt's classical thermodynamic analysis of closed, regenerative gas cycles assumed isothermal phases, which implies infinite heat transfer through cylinder walls on zero speed. The more general case of limited heat transfer coefficient and variable exposed surface area for the cylinder is treated in this paper and expressions for the cyclic pressure and temperature variations of the working fluid are derived. These are based on a pair of simultaneous first-order differential equations which do not have closed solutions, so that stepwise numerical integration methods must be used. A complete heat balance is obtained so that actual efficiencies or coefficients of performance can be calculated instead of assuming them to be equal to the ideal values of a Carnot cycle, as was general practice up to now.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS2436
This specification covers the engineering requirements for applying aluminum oxide to metal parts by detonation deposition and the properties of such coatings.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS7267
This specification covers a silicone (VSI) rubber in the form of molded rings. These rings have been used typically as sealing rings for service from -65 to +260 degrees C (-85 to +500 degrees F) in contact with air, but usage is not limited to such applications. The cross-section of such rings is usually not over 0.275 in. (6.98 mm) in diameter or thickness.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS7454B
1. SCOPE: 1.1 Type: This specification covers high quality holts and screws made of a low-alloy, heat resistant steel. 1. 2 Application: Primarily for joining parts where high strength up to 900'F (480'C) is reqnired.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS5700B
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS5774
This specification covers a corrosion and heat resistant steel in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-tungsten-arc or gas-metal-arc welding of parts fabricated from steels or alloys of similar composition requiring joints with strength and corrosion resistance comparable to those of the basis metal, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS5768C
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant iron-chromium-nickel-cobalt alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or heading.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS5650A
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of bars, wire, forgings, mechanical tubing, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS3380
null, null
This specification covers polytetrafluoroethylene resin in the form of extruded and sintered flexible tube reinforced with wire braid. Primarily for fluid lines operating in service up to 230 degrees C (446 degrees F) and under pressures up to 1500 psi (10,342 kPa).
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS4125E
This specification has been declared “NONCURRENT” by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of August 2009. It is recommended, therefore, that this specification not be specified for new designs. “NONCURRENT” refers to those materials which may have been widely used previously and which may be required for production or processing of existing designs in the future. The Aerospace Materials Division, however, does not recommend these specifications for future use in new designs. “NONCURRENT” specifications are available from SAE upon request.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS4171A
This specification has been 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of September 1996. Alloy: 7079-T6 UNS Number: A97079
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS4058
This specification has been 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of February 1996.
1960-01-01
Standard
AMS4057
This specification has been 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of February 1996.

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