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Viewing 169981 to 170010 of 184285
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620246
W. E. Morris
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620259
Raymond A. Cellitti
This paper deals with some important points to be considered (in planning tests of structures or structural components under simulated laboratory service loading, and the main purposes of such tests; Test methods and equipment) are discussed along with the (application and reliability of results to be expected; Particular attention is given to types of fatigue testing machines, important factors affecting test results, test procedure and techniques, presentation of results, and the analysis and application of fatigue data.)
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620257
M. Erickson, R. Batchelor
This paper points out the importance of advanced design and development techniques in producing vehicles that meet the demand for greater capacity, utility, ease of operation, and operator comfort. The design approach is broken down into four stages and each is discussed with reference to various factors such as materials strength and working stresses. Design evaluation is treated in relation to load and structural strength. These techniques produce an efficient and economical product, and as the authors emphasize, companies that use them have a definite advantage over competitors who still retain the cut and try methods.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620258
Donald Zook, Charles Weinrich
This paper first discusses the loads of major significance to various machines and machine parts, and second, considers available methods of measuring, analyzing, and presenting information on loads and stresses. Various engine and machine components are examined from standpoints of loading methods and which loads are likely to be critical on each component. Interrelations between components and machines are also discussed. Tools and methods available to the load and stress analyst are described, with particular emphasis on choices available in methods, instrumentation, and presentation of data. Reasons for preferences in particular situations are given.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620256
Charles L. Hunt, Frank C. Linn
The development of a manned, self-propelled, lead shielded, 85-ton vehicle with manipulators, designed to operate in a radiation environment is described. The operator is provided with the capabilities to perform useful work. Notable features include: 12 in. of lead shielding; five 2 ft thick leaded windows; 550 hp main engine; 110 hp auxiliary power package; filtered air conditioning; two high capacity manipulators; emergency and safety systems; communications equipment; and cab 360 deg rotation and 25-ft elevation. Intended operation, use, and application of this technology to future vehicles is discussed.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620253
G. H. Amberg, W. S. Craig
A field survey showed that some 30% of passenger cars had serious amounts of intake valve and port deposits. A laboratory study showed that this same percentage of cars suffers high speed power losses of 5% or more due to these deposits. The successful application of a gasoline soluble detergent for control of intake system deposits is described.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620254
C. A. HALL, J. D. BARTLESON, J. B. RETZLOFF
This paper covers a number of recent engine oil developments, with particular emphasis on the use of new ashless-type additives. Additives studied include ashless dispersants, an ashless antioxidant, an ashless antirust additive, an organo-tin compound, and ethylene dibromide. In general, combinations of these additives can provide improved lubricating oils. In oils for high-output outboard engines, it was found that ethylene dibromide is extremely effective in prolonging spark plug life, regardless of the type of detergent or dispersant used. In combination with an ashless dispersant, it also reduced preignition tendencies. In addition, the use of the organo-tin compound in outboard oil has shown a striking antiwear effect, allowing a several-fold increase in gasoline-to-oil ratio. Ashless-type additives are also finding use in motor oils. Some ashless dispersants have shown exceptional ability to handle low-temperature varnish and sludge deposits.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620236
K. A. Stonex
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620235
J. G. Hansel, R. P. Forslund
This paper summarizes the results of both the preliminary studies and the initial cycle tests of a unique type of IC engine capable of operating in the absence of an atmosphere. This engine has been designed specifically for use in the general space program, and it is intended to satisfy requirements of high power to weight ratio, reliability, compactness, and short development time. The history of the en-engine's development is discussed together with problems encountered in the study. However, primary emphasis is on the recently conducted cycle tests.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620230
R. J. SAXON
The various factors that contribute to the corrosion problem in commercial vehicles are discussed. A review of the materials and methods investigated for preventing corrosion which led to the development and adoption of galvanized steel by Ford Motor Company, is presented. Examples are given of the corrosion protection obtained on the Econoline and light trucks using galvanized steel, zinc rich primer and other rust resistant primers.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620229
K. L. Raymond
Competitors in the truck sales market must recognize that “second” costs of maintenance now greatly influence the customer in his choice of “first” costs of a commercial vehicle. Corrosion assumes a very important role in maintenance costs, and as this author points out, the most direct attack upon the problem can be made only in quality production. This means that designers must incorporate vehicle parts that are easily adapted to processes of painting, dipping, coating, and other protective measures. The study discusses types of corrosion problems, methods of protection, and how definite principles of design can avoid corrosion-producing conditions and allow good protection.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620232
D. Ellis
Two types of additives are used to prevent icing in the carburetor caused by low atmospheric temperature and high humidity such as those encountered during winter or in unusual atmospheric conditions. The purpose of this study was to investigate surface active compounds rather than freezing point depressants with respect to antistalling properties. The testing apparatus, procedures, and results are fully covered here, together with a rating scale for evaluating gasoline performance.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620241
Gilbert H. Selke
This is the story of how Michigan Bell Co. solved the problem of rust deterioration in its motor vehicle fleet. Study showed that environmental conditions as well as the salt and chlorides used in highway maintenance were the chief offenders in metal corrosion. The program consists essentially of effective methods in applying a specially prepared commercial compound. It is emphasized that the method of application is just as important as the coating itself. Generous hints derived from experience in testing and trial are offered to potential users.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620242
L. A. McReynolds, Bill Mitacek
This paper discusses a laboratory evaluation of both ashless and ash-containing motor oils for use in modern internal combustion engines. The conclusion based on data from recognized laboratory engine tests is that ash-containing additives at the present state-of-the-art provide greater flexibility for overall quality in formulating motor oils. In addition, certain ash-containing materials offer a superior balance of overall crankcase lubricant performance.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620244
F. A. Christiansen, W. W. Clingan, L. M. Hartmann
Taxicab field tests of modern motor oil detergent packages showed a substantial improvement in deposit control compared to metallic sulfonate-phenate motor oils. Those containing metallic detergents, with or without supplemental ashless detergents, were less effective than ashless detergent oils. Ashless detergents provide the bonus benefits of reduced octane requirement, surface ignition, and valve and piston failures associated with metallic detergent ash. The L-43 CLR Engine Test Technique did a good job of predicting performance in severe stop-and-go service with a wide variety of today's motor oil detergents.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620237
Dwight M. McMakin, Robert W. Sexton
Air cleaners for mobile gas turbines always present a space problem. For compactness, a compromise in some phase of collector performance may be desirable. The collector must reduce the compressor wear problem sufficiently to make it economically justifiable. An inertial separator such as the Dust Louvre* appears to be suitable for this application. Flexibility in unit size is unlimited, and it can be made to fit a complex, confined space cube. The dust louver** is basically a compact self-cleaning, inertial type dust collector that will effectively handle large volumes of air with low pressure losses and adequate dust separation.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620240
James E. Doran, Paul C. Horgan
Tropical deterioration of materials and equipment has been a long standing problem in both military and industry operations. Beyond the development of specially resistant materials, the one most contributive factor to equipment long life is the preventive measure applied in maintenance procedures. The safeguards discussed in this paper are the results of a Navy study into the problem of vehicle corrosion. The protective coatings tested have proved to be generally effective, and as reported here, they may suggest closer attention from vehicle manufacturers interested in a market that must cope with this problem.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620219
D. L. Hammond, J. Lunan
A properly installed, firmly administered maintenance and calibration program will insure the maximum utilization of research equipment in a laboratory. Such a system has been successfully put into effect at the Chrysler Research Engine laboratories. Its major feature is that of preventive maintenance, that is, careful periodic evaluations of all instrumentation at a central location and a detailed control record for each piece of equipment. In addition to increasing operating efficiency, it has been found that preventive maintenance will also reduce overall maintenance costs.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620220
A. C. SAMPIETRO, K. G. MATTHEWS
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620213
R. W. Kean
A program of routine analyses is a preventive maintenance tool limited only by its own accuracy and by the extent to which test data and interpretations are utilized by the engine operator. This discussion emphasizes the importance of the part played by the engine operator, and examines in familiar terms the methods and significance of the routine areas of analytical work. The conclusion demonstrates through graphic examples how the information developed through a dozen or more routine tests is collectively interpreted, relating lubricant condition to engine condition.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620214
Hugh Elsasser
Common causes of corrosion in transportation equipment (land, sea, and air), and the progress in preventive coatings during last 25 years are presented. Results of service tests for efficiency and life of elastomer coating applications through several years are reported. Illustrations of elastomeric corrosion preventive applications on all types of transportation equipment, including railroads, truck-trailers, and amphibious craft are given. An attempt is made to rationalize the confusion in selection of proper coatings to meet specified qualifications and conditions, and to simplify choice and purchase of these materials, thus reducing high costs of tests and trials.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620215
Robert J. Sroka, Ralph L Switzer, Harry W. Roorda
This paper deals with the design and development of a naturally aspirated air-cooled, gasoline burning internal combustion engine capable of satisfying a myriad of applications in the industrial and agricultural fields. The usual practice in this field is to offer basic engines adaptable to modification as required for customer application. The Wisconsin Model V-460D engine was designed to complement an existing family of L-head engines.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620216
J. F. WHITE, H. L. PRESCOTT
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620225
James E. Montgomery, John M. Clark
The focus on greater mobility by the military services has placed new emphasis on the gas turbine. However, the high air consumption of the turbine requires air filtering provisions because of component corrosion by airborne dust particles. Therefore a program was initiated at Southwest Research Institute by the Corps of Engineers to investigate this problem. Results of the study showed that turbine components are vulnerable to particles as small as 2-5 μ at average dust concentrations. Turbine life appears to be inversely proportional to the product of the dust concentration and maximum particle size.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620226
David W. Onan
The J Series of engines was developed after due consideration of durability, dependability, and flexibility, and the requirements of many users. The J Series consists of 12 engines; air-cooled gasoline and diesel, and marine water-cooled gasoline and diesel, each in 1-, 2-, and 4-cyl versions. The engines are fully described, with development background and reasons for many of the features.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620227
J. R. McLean, M. D. Odegaard
Up to this time, level road traction requirements of a car could be determined only by various time-consuming road and bench tests. The development of a basic formula to compute loading for constant speed, level road operation has solved some of the cost and time problem and gives reasonable agreement with experimental values. A discussion of the variables encountered, different ways of obtaining them, and their correlation with the equation for computing traction requirements shows the application of the formula to various car dimensions and temperature/air resistance conditions
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620228
C. O. Durbin
A test was conducted on two cars to determine the effectiveness of a dip process for protection against corrosion. Improvements of the dip process were better cleaning of inside surfaces of enclosed structural members, solving the problem of solvent refluxing or vapor washdown, and replacement of fluid deadener on the top side of floor pans with a heavy coat of water reducible dip primer followed by a heavy coat of the body primer. Results of the test indicate that the process is successful.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620223
Richard K. Smyth, Nasser E. Nahi
A general design philosophy for self-adaptive control systems is outlined. The selection of a suitable self-adaptive performance criterion (SAPC) for a given system application is considered. The relationship between the SAPC chosen for a particular system and the resulting system complexity is discussed. Problems of measuring the SAPC and adjusting the parameters to achieve desired performance are illustrated by examples. Stability of self-adaptive control system is considered from a general point of view. A method for considering the stability-in-the-small for the general self-adaptive control system by a method of perturbation is described. This method also determines the dynamic performance of the self-adaptive controller when the system is subjected to a changing environment.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620224
Mark G. Mund, Theron E. Wright
The basis for performance and physical goals set for vehicular gas turbine air cleaners is followed by a discussion of laboratory and field test results obtained on air cleaners designed to meet the set goals. Test results indicate that: 1.) one level of protection, specifically one type of air cleaner, will probably not meet the needs of all types of gas turbines in various environments and applications; 2.) regenerative turbines may require a higher level of efficiency than non-regenerative turbines; 3.) a properly designed cyclone air cleaner will provide adequate protection for non-regenerative turbines and possibly some regenerative turbines; and 4.) properly designed extended area filters meet the air cleaner requirements of gas turbines in certain applications and environments. To obtain full benefit of an air cleaner design, the total induction system of the gas turbine must be planned early in vehicle design.

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