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Viewing 169981 to 170010 of 172607
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390102
H. C. Mougey
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390105
J.J. BROEZE, J.O. HINZE
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390104
A. E. Dunstan
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390090
H. F. Schwedes
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390091
R. J. Vedovell
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390092
A. Ludlow Clayden, William S. Canning
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390093
A. E. Becker
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390094
Edward C. Wells, E. Gifford Emery
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390095
Norman G. Shidle
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390096
Enrique Touceda, James H. Lansing
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390097
Torbjorn V. Dillstrom
ABSTRACT
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390082
F. L. Faulkner
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390083
G. W. Laurie
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390084
R. C. Alden, H. M. Trimble, M. G. Blair
SUMMARY By applying mathematical relationships between A.S.T.M. distillation and equilibrium air distillation curves of winter motor fuels it is shown (1) 1938 gasolines have pronounced lower vaporization temperatures than 1928 winter gasolines. (2) There still prevails so great a range in vaporization characteristics of winter fuels that a fixed relationship between vaporization temperature and supplied air-fuel ratios can make fuel induction systems inoperable. (3) Ideal supplied air-fuel ratios for current motor fuels range from 1:1 to 6:1 at a vaporization temperature of 10°F. and through corresponding ranges at higher and lower levels for other vaporization temperatures. (4) In general, the vaporization characteristics of modern winter gasolines are such that, except at extremely low vaporization temperatures, only a very moderate choking is necessary to attain operable air vapor mixtures.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390085
J. R. Bartholomew
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390086
Ellis W. Templin
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390087
W. J. Cumming
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390088
Walter A. Hite
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390089
Henry H. Kerr, F. C. Frank
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390119
E. T. Vincent
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390121
E. L. Bass, C. H. Barton
IT may be necessary to compromise among the ring-sticking, sludge-forming, and corrosion properties of oil for civil aircraft engines, the authors suggest. No laboratory tests are yet able to predict the performance of an oil in an aircraft engine, they contend, and therefore, full-scale engine tests are necessary for final judgment. However, they explain, much preliminary work can be carried out in suitable small units. To illustrate the complexity of the problem the authors set forth five requirements for an aircraft-engine lubricant: 1. It must not cause ring-sticking under the full-throttle detonating conditions of take-off. 2. It must not cause ring-sticking under weak-mixture cruising conditions. 3. It must give freedom from sludging so that there is no ring-jamming, so that the oil scrapers are kept free, and so that the overhaul periods are not limited. 4. It must provide protection from cold corrosion. 5.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390120
H. A. Hicks, G. H. Parker
HARSHNESS in the ride of an automobile is felt as a disagreeable tremor or shock, sudden in nature as distinguished from the opposite sensation which could be described as slow, soft, and mellow, the authors state. They add that it is in the nature of a tremor having a frequency in the higher shake range and approaching the threshold of audibility. This paper is limited to analysis of the harsh vibrations which emanate from tire contact with the road, excluding the effects of the tires themselves. The authors describe methods of measuring harshness both in the laboratory and on the road, discuss car harshness in its relation to rigidity, and touch upon its relation to suspension. It is pointed out that there has been a decided trend toward more rigid construction and that, in general, harshness has increased as rigidity has been obtained. It is also noted that fore-and-aft shocks are more pronounced with independent suspension than when leaf springs are used.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390115
Richard C. Molloy, Roger W. Griswold
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390114
Thomas B. Rhines
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390117
F. M. Young
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390127
B. A. Yates
THE importance of the material of the piston ring has too long been relegated to the background as compared with such design factors as ring proportions, ring loadings, circularity, point pressure, and so on; therefore, this paper concentrates on the material factors - such as composition, structure, and surface finish - which should go into the modern piston ring. The causes of piston-ring wear are analyzed and classified under three headings - abrasion, corrosion, and erosion. Various types of coating materials, both metallic and non-metallic, employed to reduce the severity of scuffing or scoring, are considered. Test results are revealed that indicate that superficial coatings reduce piston-ring wear from scuffing and erosion, and that a very thin coating of tin was more effective than other types of metallic and non-metallic coatings.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390126
E. S. Ewart
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390129
Bishop Clements
THE magnaflux method of inspection is comparatively new and, as yet, definite specification requirements have not been written. Definite requirements are being requested by various groups, but it is believed impossible to lay them down except for individual parts. This paper attempts to discuss the various types of indications, but it is impossible to state definitely what detrimental effect the majority of the indications will have.

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