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Viewing 169981 to 170010 of 174169
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450203
Duncan B. Gardiner
AIRPLANE hydraulic braking systems must be designed to have the highest standard of performance without sacrificing reliability. By the use of a multielement oscillograph the various characteristics of the braking system can be recorded simultaneously so that the value of design changes can easily be determined. Oscillograms for a typical aircraft braking system show that relatively minor changes result in a wide differential in performance and emphasize the conclusion that design changes in a hydraulic brake system should be evaluated with the oscillograph.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450202
WILLIAM M. S. RICHARDS, FRANK H. ERDMAN
THE difficulty encountered while attempting to correlate altitude cooling requirements with sea-level performance led to the resumption of intensive study of the cooling correlation problem by the Wright Aeronautical Corp. early in 1942. Any correlation of this nature endeavors to establish the relation between engine operating conditions, cylinder-head temperature, pressure drop across the engine, pressure and temperature of the cooling air, cooling air consumption, and heat rejection to the cooling air. A correlation method based on the density of the air as it leaves the fin passages, which involves the temperature rise and pressure drop of the cooling air, has been developed. A graphical solution of the equations has been evolved which requires a knowledge of only the entering air conditions to enable one to solve for all the above cooling requirements.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450198
H. B. OSBORN
PRESENTED here in understandable terms are the principles of induction heating, along with a discussion of the equipment needed, control factors involved, and applications in the automotive industry. Induction heating will continue to fill an important need in industry, for it reduces the man-hours and material charges per unit manufactured, as well as having such advantages as accurate temperature control, minimum floor space required, and more efficient use of equipment.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450197
H. A. AMBROSE, C. E. TRAUTMAN
STUDY of the foaming of engine oil by the CLR Group on Foaming has led to the development of what is called antifoam agents, which, when added to the oil, eliminate foaming under most conditions. These inhibitors of foam, the authors report, have no detrimental effect on the oil. Nonfoaming engine oils are now available for the Army and Navy; and, as far as can be determined, complaints from foaming of Army and Navy specification engine oils have now been eliminated.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450196
A. T. COLWELL, R. E. CUMMINGS, D. E. ANDERSON
RECENT successes with the use of water injection for increasing the power of aircraft engines have renewed interest in what is really an old idea. Although early tests were made with the injection of water alone, it now appears that the injection of alcohol or a mixture of alcohol and water gives superior results in many cases. Basing their predictions on the results of an extensive testing program, the authors of this paper feel that alcohol-water injection has a field of use in both aircraft and ground-vehicle engines, where it can give more power and smoother operation, with a fuel of about 12 octane numbers less than the normal engine requirement.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450199
C. B. VEAL
THIS discussion of CRC outlines topically the content of its activity, touches upon the development of its organization, and illustrates two phases of its work, the formulation of test procedures and the impetus to the development of new products.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450238
C. A. Gladman
The paper describes some features of the work of a special Service Committee set up by the Admiralty, for the purpose of standardizing drawing office practice in certain of their design departments. Basic principles are established for the guidance of designers and draughtsmen when preparing drawings for interchangeable components, and logical methods of approaching solutions to dimensional problems and of stating these on drawings are discussed. Particular attention has been paid to such problems as the best method of analysing, and dimensioning and applying tolerances to interchangeable components which involve tapered, concentric, or positional features such as holes and studs. Stress is laid upon the need for foreseeing, and avoiding as far as possible in the design stage, any special difficulties which may arise in practice in the construction of manufacturing equipment or of practical gauges for controlling the dimensions of components.
1945-01-01
Magazine
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450139
P. H. Schweitzer, L. P. Sharples
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450201
W. L. WHEELER
OIL system problems resulting from high-power and high-altitude operation are listed. The various parts of an oil system are described in detail to show their effect on the overall performance of the system as related to these problems. Curves are included to show oil pump performance and oil tank efficiency. Examples are given to illustrate the characteristics of various oil system configurations as a means of explaining why the problems listed are encountered. After offering explanations of the various problems, practical methods to achieve a remedy are suggested. Oil dilution and the effect of fuel in the oil are discussed. The subject of oil foaming is discussed with particular reference to the effect of oil antifoaming additives. A thorough analysis is made of oil system performance using additives to show the disadvantages as well as the advantages. A brief outline is presented of future work which should be conducted to achieve improvement in oil system performance.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450209
T. H. Peirce
PRESENTED here is a general picture of the mechanical function of crude rubber when combined with metals for the purpose of torsional vibration control. Dampers of this type have been successfully designed and produced for engines of various displacements up to 650 hp. The author believes that in the future it will be possible to design bonded rubber dampers for engines of greater power output. The characteristics and test data included will show what result can be obtained with the addition of this type of damper.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450215
R. H. Prewitt
PRESENTED here are the basic factors of helicopter design; and in addition, the paper shows a method of designing a helicopter so that it will have optimum efficiency for both hovering and cruising flight. Further extension of helicopter design involves the use of a chart on which an efficiency factor versus operating blade light angle is plotted. All deviations from the theoretical expressions are compensated on this chart, which provides an overall comparison and design aid.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450200
E. W. ALDRICH, E. M. BARBER, A. E. ROBERTSON
REPORTED here are the methods of applying the temperature - V/L relationships to the analysis of data resulting from actual vapor-lock tests. Particular consideration is given: 1. To evaluating a fuel system in terms of the fuel of highest volatility on which it will operate under specified conditions. 2. To establishing a satisfactory specification for fuels having distillation and vapor-pressure characteristics different from the fuels employed in the vapor-lock tests. 3. To determining what conclusions can be derived from different items of test data.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450067
Frederic P. Porter
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450194
C. F. BACHLE
A COMPOUND engine, consisting of a piston engine mechanically connected to a turbine, with the turbine receiving the piston-engine exhaust, is suggested by Mr. Bachle as a method of converting into useful work some of the exhaust-gas energy of both diesel and gasoline engines that is usually wasted. The combination of a gasoline engine compound with gas turbine and driven by a propeller is considered by Mr. Bachle to offer the minimum weight of powerplant plus fuel for long-range aircraft cruising at 300 mph; for short-range cruising at 300 mph, the gas turbine and propeller combination is best, with the gas turbine driven by jet propulsion offering the next best possibilities. Only when higher speeds become more practical, as a result of reduced aircraft drag, does Mr. Bachle believe that piston engines may be replaced by jet-propulsion turbines.
1944-12-01
Magazine
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS4803
This specification covers a zinc alloy in the form of die castings.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2605A
This specification provides requirements and procedures for air-pressure leak testing of parts.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2602A
This specification provides requirements and procedures for air-pressure leak testing of parts.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2510A
This specification covers the engineering requirements for finishng aircraft parts and assemblies with an engine gray enamel.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2606B
This specification provides requirements and procedures for air-pressure leak testing of parts.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS2607A
This specification provides requirements and procedures for air-pressure leak testing of parts.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS5082
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of seamless tubing.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS3214A
This specification covers a nitrile (NBR) rubber in the form of sheet, strip, tubing, extrusions, and molded shapes.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS3251
This specification covers a synthetic rubber and cork composition in the form of sheet, strip, and molded shapes.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS3250
This specification covers a synthetic rubber and cork composition in the form of sheet, strip, and molded shapes.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS3420A
This specification covers silica gel dehydrating agent in the form of a granular powder in either plain or indicator grades. Indicator grades shall be impregnated with cobalt chloride.
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS3554
ABSTRACT
1944-11-01
Standard
AMS3630
This specification has been "CANCELLED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of October 1996.

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