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Viewing 169981 to 170010 of 173775
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS2574
This specification has been declared "CANCELLED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE as of January 1990.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6270A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS5036
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of sheet and strip coated on both faces with aluminum-silicon alloy by the hot-dip process. Primarily for low-stressed parts, such as brackets, clips, and sheathing, requiring corrosion resistance and oxidation resistance up to 1200F degrees (650C degrees).
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS3202
This specification covers a nitrile (NBR) rubber in the form of sheet, strip, tubing, extrusions, and molded shapes. These products have been used typically for parts such as packings, bushings, grommets, and seals requiring resistance to dry heat, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS4118B
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of bars, rods, and wire. These products have been used typically for parts requiring good strength and whose fabrication does not involve welding, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS3075
This specification covers a stable, nonvolatile, petroleum-base compound in a form suitable for application by dipping at 170 to 210 °F (77 to 99 °C).
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS3072A
This specification covers a blend of corrosion-preventive compound concentrate and petroleum-base aircraft-engine lubricating oil in the form of a ready-to-use liquid.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS3070A
This specification has been declared "CANCELLED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE as of January 1990.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS4065
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of drawn seamless tubing.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS4067
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of seamless drawn tubing.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6320A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6327A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars and forgings.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6325A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of heat treated bars and forgings.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6410
l. ACKNOWLEDGMENT: A vendor must mention this specification number and its last revision in all quotations and when acknowledging purchase orders. 2. FORM: Bars, billets, forgings, tubing, or as ordered.
1943-04-01
Magazine
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6300
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6272A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6274A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
1943-04-01
Standard
AMS6322A
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
1943-03-01
Standard
AIR3
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is written as an aid for locating and identifying various fitting designs and configurations that are designated as standard parts.
1943-03-01
Standard
AMS6310A
No scope available.
1943-03-01
Magazine
1943-03-01
Standard
AS130
This standard establishes basic design criteria including preferred bend radii, straight lengths between bends, flattening and surface conditions in the bend area. Also included is a table of preferred tubing sizes and wall thicknesses and a formula for determining a minimum bend radius for a given tube diameter.
1943-02-01
Magazine
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430147
KARL O. LARSON
THE handling of the three classes of cargo - unpackaged light pieces, unpackaged heavy units, and packaged goods in different shapes - requires, Mr. Larson says, greater simplification and standardization. Containers used for surface-shipped goods are generally too heavy for air cargo shipping, and lighter paper or fabric covers or containers are desirable. New materials for this purpose, he says, are being tested. Mr. Larson discusses the advantages of pallet loading with a lift truck. The pallet may be bolted to the floor, thus eliminating strain of lashing. Parking space requirements for a medium-sized cargo plane are about 150 ft square. A terminal of 10,000 sq ft to handle cargo from this size ship would require a 70-ft wide building one-story high, and 150-ft along one edge of the berth. These figures are based on 12 loadings per day. For each additional berth, the terminal must be extended accordingly.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430148
A. L. MORSE
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430145
MAX M. ROENSCH
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430143
J. O. ALMEN
IT is doubtful whether we are getting more net work from metals today in dynamically loaded parts than was obtainable 25 years ago, and no super-strength-alloy discoveries seem imminent; however, much can be done to increase the fatigue strength of many machine parts made from ordinary structural materials by merely extending processes already known to be satisfactory, and avoiding practices that reduce fatigue strength. We have today new concepts of fatigue failure: Fatigue failures result only from tension stresses, never from compressive stresses. Any surface, no matter how smoothly finished, is a stress-raiser. Structural materials are not rigid. Many fatigue failures can be traced to elastic deflection for which no allowance was made in design. From experience with practical machine parts, we can only conclude that stress calculations by textbook methods are wholly inadequate unless we generously temper our calculations with experience.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430146
H. L. KNUDSEN
THE inescapable conclusion of Mr. Knudsen is that an immersion heater is required for the starting of diesel engines at subzero temperatures. “With this method,” he says, “the danger of scoring and scuffing pistons and cylinders during the cranking period due to improper oil films is removed. The engine can be started with the lubricating oil most suitable for it at operating temperature. Cranking power requirements are no greater than in the summertime, so the batteries need not be excessively large for winter starting - even the batteries might be kept up to temperature by an immersion heater, and hence a further reduction in weight and capacity would be possible.” Mr. Knudsen resolves the problem of subzero starting into several parts: 1. The fuel oil must be able to flow freely at starting temperatures. 2. Lubricating oil must be available that permits cranking at about 100 rpm at the desired starting temperature with reasonable starting-power requirements. 3.

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