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Viewing 188221 to 188250 of 188740
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190028
ARCHIBALD BLACK
THIS paper describes the various types of radiator installations in use. Tabulated data on several makes of radiation and on successful airplane radiator installations are given. A brief review of laboratory tests is made and the features to be considered in design and manufacture are discussed. The author concludes by cautioning engineers against attempting to base new designs entirely upon experimental data, without comparing the tentative design with existing successful installations.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190026
C H DAY
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190024
CORNELIUS T MYERS
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190049
E H BELDEN
Efficiency, appearance and comfort will be the catchwords of the car of the future. Extreme simplicity of chassis will be needed to reduce weight and permit the use of substantial sheet-metal fenders, mud-guards and bodies. The center of gravity should be as low as possible consistent with good appearance. For comfort the width and angle of seats will be studied more carefully and the doors will be wider. A new type of spring suspension is coming to the fore, known as the three-point cantilever. Cars adopting it will have a certain wheelbase and a longer spring base. A car equipped with this new mechanism has been driven at 60 m.p.h. in safety and comfort without the use of shock absorbers or snubbers. It is the opinion of the author that this new spring suspension will revolutionize passenger-car construction.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190046
P W KLINGER
In the past the majority of trucks have been equipped with wood wheels. These gave good service, but the results demanded under strenuous modern conditions seem, the author states, to make the substitution of steel wheels on medium and heavy-duty trucks imperative. Truck engineers and builders seem to recognize the fact, but to hesitate to make the change, chiefly because a metal wheel is somewhat higher in first cost and because some designs have not as yet rendered the service expected of them. The service return of metal wheels is given from the records and reports of the London General Omnibus Co. and the Fifth Avenue Coach Co., both of which use steel wheels exclusively. The added mileage is in excess of wood-wheel service and exceptional tire mileage is shown. The author states briefly the arguments for the hollow-spoke, hollow-rim, the hollow full-flaring spoke and the integral-hub metal wheels.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190044
LEWIS P KALB
The paper treats the subject of ability from the point of view of its relation to the present trend in motor-truck design, setting forth some of the fundamental considerations involved. An ability formula when applied to automotive vehicles is to determine a “factor of experience” from which engine sizes and gear ratios can be calculated. While passenger-car performance is measured in terms of speed and acceleration, the latter are not the most important considerations in motor trucks, the speed of which is limited by the use of a governor. Wind resistance also is negligible at truck speeds. Practically the only resistances to be overcome by a motor truck are road friction and the force of gravity. Both road and grade resistance are in direct proportion to weight carried and are usually expressed in terms of pounds per pound.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190034
DAVID BEECROFT
THE author's observations cover the period immediately following the war when, as a member of a party of representative guests of the British and French governments, he toured England, meeting Government officials and talking on industrial matters; visited Scotland's shipbuilding and coal areas; viewed the battle area, aircraft, automobile and tractor factories in France; and traveled in Italy, later returning to England to inspect factories, conduct investigations and review Government activities. The enormous expansion of the automotive industry factories of the Allied nations is emphasized and their organization and methods briefly described, with running comment on comparative practice in the United States. Factory production methods in England are mentioned, as well as working conditions and welfare work there. Considerable information relating to post-war automobile designs and to motor-truck and tractor practice is given.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190066
WALTER T FISHLEIGH
The nineteen months preceding Nov. 11, 1918, constituted the most far-reaching educational period in the history of the United States. The war being over, both opportunity and danger are ahead. Automotive manufacturers, engineers and educators have large responsibilities in post-war industrial rehabilitation. A frank discussion of several prime demands is presented. After outlining the achievements of the war period, the lessons thereof are enumerated, special emphasis being placed upon cooperation and teamwork, and the automotive manufacturers urged to give consideration to the permanent and stable establishment of their business and product. Attention is called to the part universities can and should take in practical service, in conducting automotive engineering courses, giving public instruction and furthering good roads development and highways transport.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190068
L C FREEMAN
The necessity for a powerful heavy-duty truck with power transmitted through all four wheels was apparent shortly after the United States became involved in the war. An intensive study of the four-wheel-drive situation finally resulted in the design of the Ordnance four-wheel-drive truck and the modified form known as the artillery wheeled tractor. Seven factors influencing the preparation of the specifications are stated and discussed. The determination of proper gear ratios is analyzed. The considerations leading to the adoption of the universal-joint type of driving-shaft are mentioned and its application commented upon. Ten specific points of internal interchangeability of the mechanism are enumerated.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190065
R H UPSON
Airships were not generally considered important before the war. Many thought they would never become practical as a means of transportation. The proper conception of what an airship is having first been explained, the three principal ways in which progress has been made are specified as weight-saving, improvement of overall propulsion efficiency and decreasing resistance and increase in size. The last mentioned feature is discussed in some detail, the conclusion being that practically anything is possible, given an airship of sufficient size. The future needs of airship development are then considered, such as more suitable engines, multiple powerplants, dependability, the development of better fabric and better landing and hangar facilities.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190064
D W DOUGLAS
The factors included in the commercial airplane problem are the practical use that can be made of airplanes, the volume of business that can be expected, the necessary changes from present military types to make an efficient commercial airplane and what the future holds for this new means of transportation. The requirements for passenger transportation, airmail and general express service, are first discussed in detail, consideration then being given to other possibilities such as aerial photography and map-making, the aerial transportation of mineral ores, sport and miscellaneous usage. Changes in the present equipment of engines and airplanes to make them suitable for commercial use are outlined, and special features of aerial navigation, landing fields and legal questions are mentioned.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190050
William B. Stout
ABSTRACT
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190015
R. De GOLYER
MEXICO achieved second place among the petroleum-producing nations of the world in 1918. This position will not soon be relinquished, judging from the study made by the author of the two general regions from which petroleum has thus far come. The Petroleum Commission of the Mexican Government has issued statistics covering the production by years since the industry started. It is confidently hoped that future production will continue, as indicated, to stop the gap, constantly increasing and critical, between production and consumption in the United States. A section of the paper is devoted to the export trade, especially with this country, which furnishes the nearest great market.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190014
H C DICKINSON
Abstract THE approaching exhaustion of the petroleum supply, from which nearly all of the available internal-combustion engine fuel is produced, raises two vital questions, upon the answers to which will depend the future of the automotive industry. These are (a) what fuels are to be available, from the point of view of the engine designer and (b) how much transportation can be secured from the fuel used. It is not certain that satisfactory engines can be developed to handle a wider range of fuels than those used at present. It is therefore not clear whether the trend of development will be toward two or more different grades of fuel, or toward a single mixed fuel to be used in all engines ultimately designed to burn it.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190010
CHARLES F KETTERING
ABSTRACT
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190006
HOWARD C MARMON
ANY aggregation of parts assembled to obtain a mechanical result is a series of compromises. The relative importance of the objectives governs the nature of the compromise. The major objectives to be considered in the design of airplane engines are (1) Reliability (2) Small weight per horsepower (3) Economy of fuel and oil consumption (4) Carburetion that permits of easy starting; maximum power through a range of 30 per cent of the speed range; and idling at one-quarter maximum speed without danger of stalling (5) Ability to deliver full power through a small speed range without excessive vibration (6) Complete local cylinder-cooling under conditions of high mean effective pressure (7) Compactness The automobile engine must have (1) Reliability (2) Silence (3) Carburetion that accomplishes proper and even firing in all cylinders under varying throttle conditions, through speeds covering more than 90 per cent of the speed range of the engine.
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180032
WILLIAM B STOUT
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180039
F W CALDWELL
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180036
HERBERT CHASE

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