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Viewing 188221 to 188250 of 190399
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370102
H. O. West
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370101
HARLAN D. FOWLER
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370096
E. A. Mallett
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370095
C. M. LARSON
With the increase in horsepower output per cubic inch displacement, gasoline and Diesel engines are more susceptible to ring sticking and piston ring or cylinder liner wear. Formerly crank case oil stability (how the used oil looked when drained after 50 hours or more operation in an engine) was considered of prime importance. It was thought that the tendency of mineral oils to cause ring sticking depended largely on the degree of refinement of the lubricating oil, but this has not proven to be the case with Diesel engines or with high output gasoline engines. Highly solvent treated oils have been shown to be deficient in lubricating value and ring sticking caused by excessive blowby has resulted. Such high output gasoline and Diesel engines will operate on straight mineral oils at reduced loads; but reduced cylinder wear, freedom from ring sticking and sludge reduction can be had only with proven addition agents.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370098
E. J. W. Ragsdale
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370097
H. C. Edwards
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370108
G. P. Young
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370107
O. A. Axelson
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370110
Chris Bockius, John Bassett
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370109
Joseph T. Morris
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370104
W. W. Lowther
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370103
W. L. Losson
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370106
Francis B. Flahive
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370105
E. W. Jahn
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370192
Austin M. Wolf
DEPENDING upon the location of the front wheel, the door and step are placed either at the front or back of the cab. Some designs incorporate a protruding “hood” portion, whereas others extend the cab fully forward. The engine compartment is either immediately back of the radiator or under the cross seat. The floor and seat heights are relatively higher than in the conventional truck, and better visibility is obtained. The engine hood is well insulated for heat and sometimes for sound as well. Most powerplants are removable readily for major repairs although, in most instances, major maintenance operations can be done readily within the cab. Front axle treads have been increased in order to give greater stability on the road as well as to avoid an excessively large wheelhouse. The change in weight distribution has called for considerably more study on braking distribution.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370193
Donald H. Wood
RECENT work on cowlings for air-cooled engines has been characterized by the correlation of the cooling function of the cowl with the drag-reducing function into a rational design procedure, whereas earlier work was devoted largely to drag reduction and this was a cut-and-try proceeding. The fundamental relations between the pressures and velocities of the external and internal air flows are discussed here in their relation to the quantity of air available for cooling and the effect on drag. Experimental results are outlined, and a design procedure is indicated. It is pointed out that certain factors must be determined by the engine manufacturers in order that a rational design of cowl may be laid out. The shape of the cowling nose is not critical, and the part of the drag that is subject to control is determined by the air flow out the cowl exit. For an efficient cowling and for control of the air flow, the exit is the important part.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370194
John Oswald
1937-01-01
Magazine
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370122
R. H. McCarroll
AFTER tracing the development of laminated safety glass, this paper describes the manufacture of this material as made at the new glass works of the Ford Motor Co. In 1927 the Ford Motor Co. introduced it as standard equipment in the windshields of its cars. Improvement followed shortly after the development became a cooperative effort.
1936-12-01
Magazine
1936-11-01
Magazine
1936-10-01
Magazine
CURRENT
1936-09-26
Standard
AGS1624-4
No scope available.
1936-09-01
Magazine
CURRENT
1936-08-20
Standard
AGS966-7
No scope available.
1936-08-01
Magazine
CURRENT
1936-07-24
Standard
AGS957-6
No scope available.
1936-07-01
Magazine
CURRENT
1936-06-22
Standard
AGS946-4
No scope available.
1936-06-01
Magazine

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