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Viewing 188461 to 188490 of 190619
1936-11-01
Magazine
1936-10-01
Magazine
CURRENT
1936-09-26
Standard
AGS1624-4
No scope available.
1936-09-01
Magazine
CURRENT
1936-08-20
Standard
AGS966-7
No scope available.
1936-08-01
Magazine
CURRENT
1936-07-24
Standard
AGS957-6
No scope available.
1936-07-01
Magazine
CURRENT
1936-06-22
Standard
AGS946-4
No scope available.
1936-06-01
Magazine
1936-05-01
Magazine
1936-04-01
Magazine
CURRENT
1936-03-02
Standard
AGS963-9
No scope available.
CURRENT
1936-03-02
Standard
AGS964-9
No scope available.
CURRENT
1936-03-01
Standard
AGS965-8
No scope available.
1936-03-01
Magazine
1936-02-01
Magazine
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360143
Don R. Berlin
THIS paper includes comments on advantages over other types of structure; adaptability to machine manufacture for production and design considerations to best accomplish normal life of structure which may be expected under continued service; and frequency of overhaul necessary to basic structure during life of airplane.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360144
George Calingaert, S. D. Heron, Ralph Stair
A STUDY has been made of materials available and suitable for the construction of transparent windows employed for observation inside the combustion-chamber. Materials that can be used include quartz, spinel, sapphire, periclase, and fluorite. The transparency of these materials in the infrared region increases in the order just mentioned. Mechanical strength varies greatly, being highest for sapphire and lowest for fluorite. Resistance to the chemical action of the combustion products varies widely. Sapphire is not attacked by any products of combustion, including the lead oxide present when leaded fuels are used. The choice of a suitable material for a given investigation will be based on a judicious balance of the four chief characteristics: mechanical resistance, chemical resistance, transparency, and cost.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360142
E. S. Chapman
THIS paper describes production methods of pistons characterized by an elliptical skirt having a slot or slots that affect the form of the piston under operating conditions, as practiced at the Plymouth Motor Corp. Design changes that have affected production technique and changes in production practice itself are important recent developments in aluminum-alloy pistons. Foundry data include a description of the small open-hearth furnaces and the permanent molds with collapsing cores employed. Other foundry operations - heat-treating, sprue cropping, hardness testing, and rough machining - are dealt with fully. In this foundry an output of 18,000 pistons per 24-hr. day can be maintained in an area of 1,200 sq. ft. This type of piston fits the cylinder bore with about a 0.001-in. clearance in a cold motor, the expansion at operating temperatures being compensated for in the slotted skirt. This skirt is in the form of an ellipse whose minor axis is 0.011 in. less than its major axis.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360147
Karl Lürenbaum
MUCH remains to be desired in the vibration characteristics of present crankshaft-propeller systems, in the opinion of the author. Discrepancies between torque-stand and flight measurements of torsional vibration on the same engine may explain propeller fractures due to the vibration of flexure. Recent fatigue fractures of crankshafts, differing from those due to torsional vibration, must be attributed to longitudinal vibration. Degrees of freedom are discussed with a graphical summary of vibration frequencies. Vibration forms, sources, stresses, and resonances are subjected to mathematical analysis. Three roads open to effective measures against vibration are given as: direct elimination of sources; subsequent destruction or damping of existing vibrations; and changing the pitch of the vibrating system, or displacing the resonance points to fields outside of the operating range. Of these methods the last is believed to be the most promising.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360148
Frank R. Fageol
THE successful development of the chassisless motorcoach and its relation to safety, weight reduction and automotive design are discussed by the author. Pioneer design of this type, made back in 1927 after encountering various difficulties with conventional frames, was followed by successive improvements in design, resulting in the highly developed unit of today. A study is included of the engineering fundamentals primarily involved in the integral or chassisless design versus conventional-frame design from a strength and weight standpoint. This study involves a comparison with other more concrete objects to establish a definite insight to the why and wherefore of these structural changes. The relation to body safety design and its interconnection to weight distribution, vehicle balance, and resistance to crushing are also covered by the author.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360145
D. W. Sherman
ALONG with larger tires, independent wheel suspensions, higher speeds, and the dynamic and vibrational problems associated with these innovations, came the need for chassis frames having a high resistance to torsional movements. The X-member-type frame has been the most generally adopted means for obtaining increases in this direction. However, the past few years have seen the need for torsional rigidity in the chassis frame to be intensified. Although considerable gains have been made, in general, these gains have been accomplished not by major improvements in the design of the structure but by the addition of material. Consequently, the weight of the chassis frame has become a serious problem, so much so that in many cases special heavy frames are being used for the open-body types where the need for a stiff frame is acute.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360146
R. A. Rose, G. C. Wilson, R. R. Benedict
SOLUTION of the problem of igniting and burning the fuel in the high-speed Diesel engine profoundly affects its development, according to the authors. This paper describes the photo-electric set-up selected to indicate the behavior of the fuel in the combustion-chamber because of its high speed, its intensity, its zero time lag, and its freedom from inertia effects. A magnetic-type oscillograph for recording the impulses, a cantilever-spring indicator for picking up the pressure impulse, and an amplifier between the photo-cell and the oscillograph, comprise the principal parts of this instrumentation, as applied to a single-cylinder test engine. Results of tests with a three-beam vibrator-type oscillograph are given with oscillograms for different fuels, loads, and injection angles. Other tests are described using a cathode-ray oscillograph and a high-speed camera.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360151
L. P. Saunders
EVOLUTION of automobile radiators is recounted step by step from the primitive water-pipe types to those in use today. Pertinent heat-transfer principles are given to show cause for various changes. The effects of larger engines, higher speeds, quieter operation, are discussed fully. Poor water-jacket design is blamed for a multitude of cooling-system troubles, such as warped valves, valve seats, and cylinder bores, and it is believed that these troubles could be eliminated largely on the drawing board by the water-jacket designer. A special test apparatus, called a “dissipator” and built expressly for testing radiators, is described. Considerable space is devoted to test procedure and discussion of test results on hexagon-core, fin-and-tube core, double-center core, and a new vee-type radiator for different depths, air speeds, and frontal areas. In addition, tests made on a full-sized wind tunnel are discussed and interpreted.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360150
E. M. Dodds
THIS paper describes a number of applications of the cathode-ray tube to the solution of engine problems, such as indication of pressures in the cylinder and in Diesel fuel lines; mechanical vibration of moving parts; torsional oscillations of shafts; whip of shafts; and time of arrival and duration of flame at any point in the cylinder-head. The different technique involved when hard-vacuum cathode-ray tubes are used instead of the gas-filled variety, is also indicated. An outline is given of some of the work rendered possible by its aid. This includes observations on the nature of the octane scale in so far as its relation to combustion pressure is concerned. A contribution is made to the theory of the mechanism of Diesel knock intensity together with some information on improving the power output and cleanliness of running of a C.F.R.-Pope Diesel engine.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360149
J. C. Edgerton
IN this paper an attempt is made to establish certain general fundamentals connected with sub-stratosphere flying. It is not intended to be a detailed engineering analysis. Emphasis is placed on the meteorological, physiological, and psychological aspects of the problem. It is shown that the safety and comfort of air-transport passengers and crew require the use of a pressure compartment if flights are to be undertaken satisfactorily above the 10,000- to 20,000-ft. level.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360015
Ralph C. Chesnutt

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