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Viewing 190861 to 190890 of 191314
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180030
C W STRATFORD
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180035
C E Sargent
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180033
FAY LEONE FAUROTE
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180034
P L Scott
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180039
F W CALDWELL
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180040
E H EHRMAN
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180037
C W STRATFORD
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180002
JESSE G VINCENT
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180036
HERBERT CHASE
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180049
C W DYSON
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180038
ARCHIBALD BLACK
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180050
DONALD MCLEOD LAY
1917-06-01
Magazine
1917-05-01
Magazine
1917-04-01
Magazine
1917-03-01
Magazine
1917-02-01
Magazine
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170008
F. G. DIFFIN
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170007
ELMER A. SPERRY
The author calls attention to the unreliability of the magnetic compass when used for aerial navigation and to the possible development of the gyroscopic compass for this purpose. He then explains how the drift of an airplane in flight makes it difficult to follow with accuracy a given course devoid of landmarks, unless an accurate drift indicator using the principle of the stroboscope is available. The development of such an instrument is then described, as are also means for synchronizing it with the compass. The use of the automatic synchronized instrument in flight over land is outlined, and its application to flight over water is described in considerable detail. Rules for aerial navigation over water, observation as to movement of wave crest and determination of wind velocity and direction are considered in their relation to the use of the instrument.
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170006
N. W. AKIMOFF
The author believes that an incompatibility exists between the results achieved in this country by the growth of the automobile industry and the almost complete lack of rational data on the most essential elements of kinetics relating to the modern automobile. He submits considerations that can be used in establishing a rational theory of spring suspension in general. A few words are devoted to the first principles of dynamics of springs, to damping, kinematic features of harmonic motion, energy consumption and shock absorbers. An introductory problem, involving an imaginary one-wheel “elemental car”, meant for purely inductive purposes, is then analyzed. Finally the main problem is presented in the form of an analysis of a skeleton-car, spring-suspended and simplified as much as possible.
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170013
CHAS. W. MEARS
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170012
ABNER DOBLE
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170011
F. W. PAWLOWSKI

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