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Viewing 191011 to 191040 of 193735
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390038
Paul Lane
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390041
M. F. Bates
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390040
Paul Harvey
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390092
A. Ludlow Clayden, William S. Canning
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390093
A. E. Becker
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390090
H. F. Schwedes
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390091
R. J. Vedovell
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390096
Enrique Touceda, James H. Lansing
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390097
Torbjorn V. Dillstrom
ABSTRACT
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390094
Edward C. Wells, E. Gifford Emery
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390095
Norman G. Shidle
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390084
R. C. Alden, H. M. Trimble, M. G. Blair
SUMMARY By applying mathematical relationships between A.S.T.M. distillation and equilibrium air distillation curves of winter motor fuels it is shown (1) 1938 gasolines have pronounced lower vaporization temperatures than 1928 winter gasolines. (2) There still prevails so great a range in vaporization characteristics of winter fuels that a fixed relationship between vaporization temperature and supplied air-fuel ratios can make fuel induction systems inoperable. (3) Ideal supplied air-fuel ratios for current motor fuels range from 1:1 to 6:1 at a vaporization temperature of 10°F. and through corresponding ranges at higher and lower levels for other vaporization temperatures. (4) In general, the vaporization characteristics of modern winter gasolines are such that, except at extremely low vaporization temperatures, only a very moderate choking is necessary to attain operable air vapor mixtures.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390085
J. R. Bartholomew
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390082
F. L. Faulkner
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390083
G. W. Laurie
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390088
Walter A. Hite
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390089
Henry H. Kerr, F. C. Frank
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390086
Ellis W. Templin
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390087
W. J. Cumming
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390077
J. M. Davies
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390076
Wm. T. Tiffin, O. R. Eads
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390075
E. L. Barger
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390074
Sidney J. Williams
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390081
L. W. Fox, A. L. MacCracken
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390080
C. B. Veal
About 27 million persons, or ½ of our total adult population, are enrolled in some form of adult education. Such education, continuing through years of maturity, engenders tolerance toward others and makes possible individual fulfillment. These are the only two forces that can successfully combat the spirit of hostility between countries, political, social or economic groups. In engineering especially, the age limit in education has been raised. The Engineering Council for Professional Development, in its minimum definition of an engineer, specifies not less than four years after graduation from an approved engineering school as the minimum time in which a young engineer can be expected to reach full professional status. Along with the increased emphasis on the post college training of engineers has occurred a change in engineering colleges themselves.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390078
H. Liggett Gray
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390069
A. R. Walker
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390067
C. F. Prutton, A. O. Willey

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