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Viewing 1 to 30 of 207
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0986
Seyd M. Sobhani
Reciprocating engines may remain as the prime movers of most vehicles even after fossil fuels are exhausted. Three simple ideas have been chiseled into shape from several theoretical and practical angles. These concept designs promote the modification of the chamber, the valves, and the connecting rod of the conventional reciprocating engines.
2010-09-28
Technical Paper
2010-01-1867
Eric Whinnem, Gary Lipczynski
The new combinations such as composites and titanium that are being used on today's new airplanes are proving to be very challenging when drilling holes during manufacturing and assembly operations. Gone are the days of hand drilling with high speed steel drills through soft aluminum structure, after which aluminum rivets would be swaged into those holes with very generous tolerances. The drilling processes today need to use cutter materials hard enough and tough enough to cut through hard metals such as titanium, yet be sharp enough to resistant abrasion and maintain size when drilling through composites. There is a constant search for better cutters and drills that can drill a greater number of holes. The cost of materials used in today's aircraft is much higher. The cutting tools are more expensive and the hole tolerances are much tighter.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2581
Alan Drysdale
A summary of waste processes and waste process data is presented in the context of mission equivalent system mass. Storage, size reduction, drying, aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation, chemical oxidation, pyrolysis, and post processing are evaluated in the context of probable long-duration missions beyond LEO, and the probable quantities and types of wastes and of the other on-board systems. An assessment of the waste systems described in the ALS Reference Missions Document is presented, and rationale for some changes to these systems is provided.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2580
Alan Drysdale, Harry Garton, Sally Hasselbrack, Roger Barker, Don Thompson, Barbara Scruggs, Lisa Fratto
Clothing accounts for a surprisingly large quantity of resupply and waste on the International Space Station (ISS), of the order of 14% of the equivalent system mass (ESM). Efforts are underway in the ISS program to reduce this, but much greater changes are likely to be possible and justifiable for long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Two approaches are being assessed for long duration missions: to reduce the mass of the wardrobe through use of lighter fabrics, and to clean clothing on board for reuse. Through good design including use of modern fabrics, a lighter weight wardrobe is expected to be feasible. Collateral benefits should include greater user comfort and reduced lint generation. A wide variety of approaches to cleaning is possible. The initial evaluation was made based on a terrestrial water-based washer and dryer system, as this represents the greatest experience base.
2005-07-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2895
John F. Lewis, John Granahan, Matt Russell, John Lumpkin
Abstract: One of the most critical functions of ECLSS is to maintain the atmospheric oxygen concentration within habitable limits. On the ISS, this function is provided by the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA). During ISS (International Space Station) crew increments 7 thru 9, the MCA was at risk of imminent failure as evident by sustained high ion-pump current levels. In the absence of continuous constituent measurement by the MCA, manual methods of estimating partial pressure of oxygen (ppO2) and concentration levels need to be developed and validated to: (1) ensure environmental control and life support, (2) prohibit ISS system and hardware damage, and (3) enable planned ISS activities that effect constituent balance.
2005-10-03
Technical Paper
2005-01-3299
Tim Brown, John Hartmann, Peter Zieve, Mark Woods
The Boeing 787 Dreamliner will be the most fuel-efficient airliner in the world when it enters service in 2008. To help achieve this, Boeing will utilize state-of-the-art carbon fiber for primary structures. Advanced manufacturing techniques and processes will be used in the assembly of large composite structures. Electroimpact has proposed a system utilizing the low recoil Low Voltage Electromagnetic Riveter (LVER) to drill and install bolts. A test program was initiated between Boeing Materials Process and Engineering (MP&E) and Electroimpact to validate the LVER process for swaging titanium collars on titanium pins in composite material. This paper details the results of these tests.
2007-07-09
Technical Paper
2007-01-3043
Mo Saiidi, John F. Lewis
The Boeing Company under the teaming agreement with the Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation and in compliance with the NASA Phase 1 contract had the responsibilities for the CEV architecture development of the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system under the NASA Phase 1 contract. The ECLS system was comprised of the various subsystems which provided for a shirt-sleeve habitable environment for crew to live and work in the crew module of the CEV. This architecture met the NASA requirements to ferry cargo and crew to ISS, and Lunar sortie missions, with extensibility to long duration missions to Moon and Mars. This paper provides a summary overview of the CEV ECLS subsystems which was proposed in compliance with the contract activities.
2000-07-10
Technical Paper
2000-01-2394
Alan E. Drysdale, Sabrina Maxwell, Michael K. Ewert, Anthony J. Hanford
Work defining advanced life support (ALS) technologies and evaluating their applicability to various long-duration missions has continued. Time-dependent and time-invariant costs have been estimated for a variety of life support technology options, including International Space Station (ISS) environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) technologies and improved options under development by the ALS Project. These advanced options include physicochemical (PC) and bioregenerative (BIO) technologies, and may in the future include in-situ-resource utilization (ISRU) in an attempt to reduce both logistics costs and dependence on supply from Earth. PC and bioregenerative technologies both provide possibilities for reducing mission equivalent system mass (ESM). PC technologies are most advantageous for missions of up to several years in length, while bioregenerative options are most appropriate for longer missions. ISRU can be synergistic with both PC and bioregenerative options.
2000-07-10
Technical Paper
2000-01-2437
Stephen F. Gray, Fernando Ramos
The International Space Station (ISS) will be the largest structure ever built in space. Differences between ISS and previous NASA vehicles led to developing new labeling methods, conventions and material. The challenge was to provide clear and meaningful identification, location, operations and safety information for the crews who will assemble, maintain and live onboard ISS.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2631
Julie A. Levri, Alan E. Drysdale
This paper discusses some of the analytical decisions that an investigator must make during the course of a life support system trade study. Equivalent System Mass (ESM) is often applied to evaluate trade study options in the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. ESM can be used to identify which of several options that meet all requirements are most likely to have lowest cost. It can also be used to identify which of the many interacting parts of a life support system have the greatest impact and sensitivity to assumptions. This paper summarizes recommendations made in the newly developed ALS ESM Guidelines Document and expands on some of the issues relating to trade studies that involve ESM.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2630
Alan Drysdale
Equivalent system mass (ESM) was defined in 1997 as an integral part of the Advanced Life Support project metric. It is particularly suited to comparing technologies that differ in mass, volume, power, cooling, and crew time during the early phases of a program. In principle, ESM can also be used to compare technologies that differ in other parameters. In practice, the necessary data is generally not available, and this limits this application. ESM has proven to be a useful tool. Like any tool, its strengths and weaknesses must be understood. This paper documents the history, capability and methods used in connection with ESM.
2002-11-05
Technical Paper
2002-01-2946
Allan W. Blunt, Mark A. Shea
The design, development and testing of electric brakes for the DARPA/USAF/Boeing X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) demonstrator is discussed. The UCAV effort presented a new set of challenges and capability requirements for the brake system. A selection of electric brake technical development results is presented.
2002-07-15
Technical Paper
2002-01-2519
Alan E. Drysdale, Sabrina Maxwell
The technology selected for waste processing has a major effect on system closure and mission equivalent system mass (ESM). In particular, recovery of the water content of solid waste can make the difference between a mission being water poor and water rich. Potential alternative sources of water that need to be considered would include recovery of water from carbon dioxide reduction, and in situ resources. This paper looks at a range of waste-processing scenarios and calculated system ESM impacts related to these options. The lowest ESM approach is generally storage or dumping. However, other issues also need to be considered. Processing may be driven by requirements such as the need to recover commodities like water, prevent release of toxic gases into the spacecraft environment, planetary protection requirements, and interface loads.
1998-11-10
Technical Paper
983105
Donald Hagemaier, Bill Jappe, Nancy Wood
Through the use of an “Integrated Product Team” approach and new inspection techniques incorporating the latest in imaging capabilities and automation, the costs of some man-power intensive tasks can now be drastically reduced. Also, through the use of advanced eddy current techniques, the detectable size of cracks under flush-head fasteners can be reduced while maintaining reliable inspection. This article describes the evaluation and results obtained using eddy current technology to determine the minimum fasteners, Secondly, it describes the integrated efforts of engineers at Boeing DPD and Northwest Airlines in the successful application of MAUS eddy current scanning of the DC-10 circumferential and axial crow splices. The eddy current scanning greatly reduced the man-hour effort required for the existing radiographic inspection
2008-08-12
Article
Vision Systems International (VSI) has been awarded an initial contract of more than $17 million from Boeing for the Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) in 145 F-15E Strike Eagles. The contract includes dual-seat capable JHMCS hardware and pilot equipment including helmets and visors.
2010-09-29
Article
Boeing has signed an agreement with the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop and fly the SolarEagle unmanned aircraft for the Vulture II demonstration program. Under the terms of the $89 million contract, SolarEagle will make its first demonstration flight in 2014.
2008-01-18
Article
Boeing and Textron have formed a teaming agreement to compete in the technology demonstration and system development phases and ultimately the production phase of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program for the U.S.
2008-06-30
Article
Boeing announced another three-month delay—from the end of the first quarter in 2008 to the end of second quarter—for the first 787 flight. Boeing is pushing back first delivery from late 2008 to early 2009.
2008-06-30
Article
With the global aerospace community committed to a greener future, a Boeing-led research team has successfully flown what it says is the world’s first manned aircraft powered by hydrogen fuel cells. Fuel-cell technology itself is not new, but this aviation initiative by Boeing Research and Technology-Europe looks destined to play an important part in the ongoing search for more environmentally friendly ways of flying.
2008-06-30
Article
Testing is under way at the U.S. Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center’s (AEDC) National Full-scale Aerodynamics complex (NFAC) on a full-scale helicopter rotor system for a U.S. DOD customer. This marks the first test at the wind-tunnel complex at Moffett Field, CA, since it was reactivated to full operational capability.
2008-06-30
Article
The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) awarded Boeing a $3.8 million contract for Phase 1 of the Vulture air vehicle program. The Vulture program calls for developing technologies and ultimately a vehicle that can deliver and maintain an airborne payload on station for an uninterrupted period of more than five years using a fixed-wing aircraft.
2008-06-30
Article
Boeing and Airbus signed an agreement to work together to ensure global interoperability in air-traffic management as part of an effort to help reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. The companies will seek the acceleration of improvements to the world’s air-transportation management system in order to increase efficiency and eliminate traffic congestion.
2008-06-30
Article
NASA awarded Boeing a $265 million contract to produce the Ares I crew launch vehicle’s instrument unit avionics (IUA). Boeing was previously selected as the Ares I upper-stage production contractor. The IUA provides the guidance, navigation, and control hardware for the vehicles, serving as the “brains” behind the rocket’s ascent.
2008-06-30
Article
Aircraft manufacturers have always desired more flexible automated drilling solutions due to constantly changing requirements as technology advances, production rates fluctuate, and new products are introduced. This desire has become more evident in recent years as manufacturers embrace lean manufacturing techniques to streamline their processes.
2008-06-30
Article
Boeing entered into an agreement with India-based TAL Manufacturing Solutions, a wholly owned subsidiary of Tata Motors, for manufacturing structural components for the 787 Dreamliner program. Under the agreement, TAL will build floor beams for the 787 using new technology with advanced titanium and composite materials.
2008-06-30
Article
Boeing and Lockheed Martin are working together to perform studies and system development efforts including collaborative research and development in pursuit of the anticipated U.S. Air Force Next Generation Bomber program.
2008-06-30
Article
Curtiss-Wright’s Metal Treatment segment has been awarded a contract by Boeing to establish a laser peen forming production cell inside Boeing’s Frederickson, WA, facility. The cell is planned to be in production during the second quarter of 2008 and would initially be used for shaping the complex curvatures of some of the wing sections of the Boeing 747-8.
2008-06-30
Article
Lufthansa Technik is responsible for keeping the Lufthansa fleet in shape. It was facing a huge challenge due to required fuselage inspections of all Boeing 737s prescribed by Boeing as a consequence of the “Aloha” accident in 1998.
2008-06-30
Article
he use of alternative, environmentally compatible power sources for aircraft is moving ahead cautiously. Although full details have not been released, Airbus has confirmed that it had successfully flight-tested a fuel-cell system in an A320 to power backup hydraulic and electric power systems.
2008-06-30
Article
Boeing recently broke ground on a new EA-18G Growler Support Center at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, WA, that will provide technical and logistics support for the U.S. Navy’s premier airborne electronic attack aircraft.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 207

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