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Viewing 1 to 30 of 95
2010-10-10
Technical Paper
2010-01-1698
Andreas Bender, Karl Haesler, Claus Thomas, Jaroslaw Grochowicz
Brake system development and testing is spread over vehicle manufacturers, system and component suppliers. Test equipment from different sources, even resulting from different technology generations, different data analysis and report tools - comprising different and sometimes undocumented algorithms - lead to a difficult exchange and analysis of test results and, at the same time, contributes to unwanted test variability. Other studies regarding the test variability brought up that only a unified and unambiguous data format will allow a meaningful and comparative evaluation of these data and only standardization will reveal the actual reasons of test variability. The text at hand illustrates that a substantial part of test variability is caused by a misinterpretation of data and/or by the application of different algorithms.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0467
Derek Rotz, Alexander Bracht, Ole Henry Dorum, Kevin Moran, James Lynch
The economic challenges and environmental imperatives facing the trucking and automobile industries today all point to a pressing need to improve fuel efficiency. Due to increasing volatility of fuel supplies, prices and a growing interest in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, fuel efficiency has taken on new urgency. In the long-haul trucking industry this is especially important given the fact that fuel accounts for a significant share of fleet operating costs. To this end Daimler and NAVTEQ have developed a system to improve fuel economy and reduce CO₂ emissions through the integration of digital map data into Advanced Driver Assistance Systems or ADAS. Digital road map attributes, especially road slope have been demonstrated to enable powertrain controls to anticipate road inclination changes and use this information to predictively enhance load management optimization versus the reactive approach afforded by current technology.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-1212
Peter Lanzerath, Anke Traebert, Alexander Massner, Uwe Gaertner
For medium- and heavy-duty diesel engines, the development of new catalyst technologies and particulate filters is necessary to fulfill increasingly stringent emission regulations. An important aspect is the durability of the after-treatment system and therefore its efficiency over lifetime. Lubrication oil additives contain components such as phosphorous or zinc to ensure engine durability. Diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and coated diesel particulate filter (cDPF) catalytic coatings are negatively influenced by contamination on the surface with these components (chemical ageing). The components have a negative impact on the exhaust after-treatment systems performance. Additionally the cDPF is filled with oil ash. Engine tests are conducted to analyze the effect of lubrication oil additives on after-treatment system performance. In one study, lubrication oil with increased sulfur ash content is used.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-1172
Norbert Waldbuesser, Josef Guenther, Hanns Hoffmann, Oliver Erlenmayer, Frank Duvinage, Christian Enderle, Joachim Schommers, Dieter Waeller
Beginning in 2010, Daimler's well-known Diesel Sprinter van has to fulfill the new and clearly tighter NOx emission standards of NAFTA10 (EPA, CARB). This requires an integrated approach of further engine optimizations and the implementation of an innovative exhaust aftertreatment technology. The goal was to develop an overall concept which meets simultaneously the tightened emission standards (including OBD limits) and the increasing customer demands of more power and torque without losing the high fuel efficiency of the small and highly efficient 3-liter V6 diesel engine OM642, which already has been installed in the NAFTA07 Sprinter. In the early stages of the concept phase, the most appropriate NOx aftertreatment technology and certification form (engine or vehicle) had to be selected for this specific vehicle class in the van segment with enhanced requirements to durability, economical efficiency and specific driving behavior.
2013-01-09
Technical Paper
2013-26-0061
Shivakumar B, Ramesh A, Vaishnavi P, Avi A. Cornelio, Dirk Limperich
The need for a consistent and reliable calculation of thermodynamic property of refrigerants has been a topic of research since the past decade. This paper reports a study of various cubic equations of state for a refrigerant being used in automotive air-conditioning applications. The thermodynamic property of refrigerant 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane (commercially known as R134a) is estimated for this purpose. A comparative analysis is made on three sets of equations of state. They are Redlich Kwong equation (RK), Peng Robinson equation (PR) and Patel Teja equation. It is found that the Patel-Teja and Peng-Robinson equations are accurate in the operating region of automotive air-conditioning system. Using these literature based equations and Maxwell correlations, thermodynamic models are developed. They estimate thermodynamic properties of saturated liquid/vapor, sub-cooled liquid and superheated vapor phases.
2013-09-08
Technical Paper
2013-24-0113
Tobias Schöffler, Kai Hoffmann, Thomas Koch
In this paper experimental results of a medium duty single cylinder research engine with spark ignition are presented. The engine was operated with stoichiometric natural gas combustion and additional charge dilution by means of external and cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). The first part of this work considers the benefits of cooled EGR on thermo-mechanical stress of the engine including exhaust gas temperature, cylinder head temperature, and knock behaviour. This is followed by the analysis of the influence of cooled EGR on the heat release rate. In this context the impact of fuel gas composition is also under investigation. The influence of increasing EGR on fuel efficiency, which is caused by a changed combustion process due to higher fractions of inert gases, is shown in this section. By application of different pistons a relationship between the piston bowl geometry and the flame propagation has been demonstrated.
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2270
Andres Font
The continuously integration of electrics and electronics (EE) in the last decades is one of the main key drivers for innovation and business success of the Automotive OEMs. This is also applicable for truck manufacturers. On the other side factors like the rising vehicle complexity, number of variants and the warranty costs for EE issues are increasing the pressure on the engineering teams responsible for the mechatronic systems. To address these issues one of the key activities in the European market (focus on Germany) during the last decade was to introduce industry-wide standards for the data transfer of wiring harness data between OEM and harness supplier. In this paper the benefits and technical background of using the standards KBL and KOMP formats within the MB-Trucks brand will be presented. Moreover the role of the Information Technology (IT) will be explained in detail.
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2263
Thomas Bardelang
Driver assistance systems (e.g. the emergency brake assist Active Brake Assist2, or ABA2 for short, in the Mercedes-Benz Actros) are becoming increasingly common in heavy-duty commercial vehicles. Due to the close interconnection with drivetrain and suspension control systems, the integration and validation of the functions make the most exacting demands on processes and tools involved in mechatronics development. In addition to a multi-stage test process focusing on the functions of the driver assistance systems (software), the “electrical” aspects (hardware) also form part of holistic maturity level validation. The test process is supported by state-of-the-art, high-performance tools (e.g. automatable component test benches and overall vehicle HiL systems) which, in particular, allow quick and accurate configuration in line with different vehicle variants.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-1742
Steffen Dehn, Christian Duelk, Sharath Srinivas, Avi Anthony Cornelio
The electric turbocharger is a promising type of air supply unit for future automotive fuel cell drive systems. It comprises of a centrifugal compressor, a variable geometry turbine and a permanent magnet synchronous motor assembled on a single shaft. Compared to other types of vehicular fuel cell air supplies, like for example a screw or roots compressor, it needs less installation space and has lower weight while also causing less noise and vibration. This paper presents a validated mechanistic model of the electric turbocharger. The stationary compressor model is based on a set of aerodynamic loss models with surge and stone wall line prediction capability. Similarly, the stationary variable axial turbine is a detailed station based model derived from aerodynamic losses at the turbine wheel and the stator blades. The aerodynamic losses incorporated in the compressor and the turbine models are implemented under MATLAB/Simulink and show a good correlation with the experimental data.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1440
Emrah Cihan Çebi, Gregor Rottenkolber, Erol Uyar
The objective of this work was the development of a real-time capable in-cylinder pressure based diesel engine-out PM estimator. Two types of experimental passenger car DI diesel engines, equipped with in-cylinder pressure sensors have been used for the PM estimator development. Measurements have been taken during steady state and transient operation on an engine test bench. Using the Engine ECU signals and in-cylinder pressure data new parameters have been derived and used as inputs for an exponential zero dimensional modeling approach. Good correlation between the estimated and measured PM has been achieved for various experiments, not only for steady state operation points but also for transient measurements. Particularly, the model delivers good qualitative results, as well as good quantitative results in some regions. PM gradients, that is, the tendency of PM to increase or decrease from one engine operating point to another are represented successfully.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0927
William Crego Prescott, Gert Heirman, Matthew furman, Joris De Cuyper, Ludger Dragon, Andre Lippeck, Horst Brauner
Digital or virtual prototyping by means of a multibody simulation model (MBS) is a standard part of the automotive design process. A high-fidelity model is built and often correlated against test data to increase its accuracy. Once built the MBS model can then be used for high fidelity analysis in ride comfort, handling as well as durability. Next to the MBS model, current industry practice is to develop a reduced degree of freedom model for the design and validation of control or intelligent systems. The models used in the control system design are required to execute in hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulations where it is necessary to run real-time. The reason for the creation of the reduced degree of freedom models so far has been that the high-fidelity or off-line model does not execute fast enough to be used in an HIL simulation.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-0213
Markus Egelhaaf, David Kress, Dieter Wolpert, Thomas Lange, Rainer Justen, Hartung Wilstermann
The number of full electric and hybrid electric vehicles is rapidly growing [1][2][3]. The new technologies accompanying this trend are increasingly becoming a focal point of interest for rescue services. There is much uncertainty about the right techniques to free trapped occupants after an accident. The same applies to vehicle fires. Can car fires involving vehicles with a lithium ion traction battery be handled in the same way as conventional vehicle fires? Is water the right extinguishing agent? Is there a risk of explosion? There are many unanswered questions surrounding the topic of electric vehicle safety. The lack of information is a breeding ground for rumours, misinformation and superficial knowledge. Discussions on various internet platforms further this trend. Tests were conducted on three lithium ion traction batteries, which were fuel-fired until burning on their own. The batteries were then extinguished with water, a surfactant and a gelling agent.
2012-09-10
Technical Paper
2012-01-1609
Prasada Rao Akula, Lakshmi Jandhyala, Frieder Herb, Akash Narayana
In order to reduce fuel consumption in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles, effective distribution of power demand between Fuel Cell and Battery is required. Energy management strategies can improve fuel economy by meeting power demand efficiently. This paper explains development of various energy management strategies for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle with Lithium Ion Battery. Drive cycles used for optimization and analysis of the strategies are New European Drive cycles (NEDC), Japanese Drive cycles (JAP1015), City Drive cycles, Highway Drive cycles (FHDS) and Federal Urban Drive cycles (FUDS). All Fuel consumption and ageing calculations are done using backward model implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK.
2012-09-10
Technical Paper
2012-01-1633
Johannes Ritzinger, Thomas Koch, Jürgen Lehmann, Konstantinos Boulouchos
In the field of heavy-duty applications almost all engines apply the compression ignition principle, spark ignition is used only in the niche of CNG engines. The main reason for this is the high efficiency advantage of diesel engines over SI engines. Beside this drawback SI engines have some favorable properties like lower weight, simple exhaust gas aftertreatment in case of stoichiometric operation, high robustness, simple packaging and lower costs. The main objective of this fundamental research was to evaluate the limits of a SI engine for heavy-duty applications. Considering heavy-duty SI engines fuel consumption under full load conditions has a high impact on CO₂ emissions. Therefore, downsizing is not a promising approach to improve fuel consumption and consequently the focus of this work lies on the enhancement of thermal efficiency in the complete engine map, intensively considering knocking issues.
2012-06-13
Journal Article
2012-01-1561
Alois Sontacchi, Robert Holdrich, Josef Girstmair, Hannes Allmaier, Stefan Bikker, Alfred Rust
In the past the exterior and interior noise level of vehicles has been largely reduced to follow stricter legislation and due to the demand of the customers. As a consequence, the noise quality and no longer the noise level inside the vehicle plays a crucial role. For an economic development of new powertrains it is important to assess noise quality already in early development stages by the use of simulation. Recent progress in NVH simulation methods of powertrain and vehicle in time and frequency domain provides the basis to pre-calculated sound pressure signals at arbitrary positions in the car interior. Advanced simulation tools for elastic multi-body simulation and novel strategies to measure acoustical transfer paths are combined to achieve this goal. In order to evaluate the obtained sound impression a roughness prediction model has been developed. The proposed roughness model is a continuation of the model published by Hoeldrich and Pflueger.
2013-05-13
Journal Article
2013-01-1922
Willy Armand Fongue
Air spring systems gain more and more popularity in the automotive industry and with the ever growing demand for comfort nowadays they are almost inevitable. Some significant advantages over conventional steel springs are appealing for commercial vehicles as well as for the modern passenger vehicles in the luxury class. Current production air spring systems exist in combination with hydraulic shock absorbers (integrated or resolved). An alternative is to use the medium air not only as a spring but also as a damper: a so-called air spring air damper. Air spring air dampers are force elements which could be a great step for the chassis technology due to their functionality (frequency selectivity, load levelling, load independent vibration behaviour, load dependent damping). Some of their design which avoid dynamic seals by the using of rubber bellows contribute to a better ride comfort.
2015-01-01
Journal Article
2014-01-9053
Tobias Breuninger, Jürgen Schmidt, Helmut Tschoeke, Martin Hese, Andreas Kufferath, Frank Altenschmidt
The spray-guided combustion process offers a high potential for fuel savings in gasoline engines in the part load range. In this connection, the injector and spark plug are arranged in close proximity to one another, as a result of which mixture formation is primarily shaped by the dynamics of the fuel spray. The mixture formation time is very short, so that at the time of ignition the velocity of flow is high and the fuel is still largely present in liquid form. The quality of mixture formation thus constitutes a key aspect of reliable ignition. In this article, the spray characteristics of an outward-opening piezo injector are examined using optical testing methods under pressure chamber conditions and the results obtained are correlated with ignition behaviour in-engine. The global spray formation is examined using high-speed visualisation methods, particularly with regard to cyclical fluctuations.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0959
Dhinesh Kumar, Ashwhanth Raju, Nitin Sheth, Steffen Digeser
Abstract The future emission regulation (BS V) in India is expected to create new challenges to meet the particulate matter (PM) limit for diesel cars. The upcoming emission norms will bring down the limit of PM by 80 % when compared to BS IV emission norms. The diesel particulate filter (DPF) is one of the promising technologies to achieve this emission target. The implementation of DPF system into Indian market poses challenges against fuel quality, driving cycles and warranty. Hence, it is necessary to do a detailed on-road evaluation of the DPF system with commercially available fuel under country specific drive cycles. Therefore, we conducted full vehicle durability testing with DPF system which is available in the European market to evaluate its robustness and reliability with BS III fuel (≤350ppm sulfur) & BS IV (≤50ppm sulfur) fuel under real Indian driving conditions.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2756
Basaran Ozmen, Mehmet Bakir, Murat Siktas, Serter Atamer, Roman Teutsch
Abstract Securing the desired strength and durability characteristics of suspension components is one of the most important topics in the development of commercial vehicles because these components undergo multiaxial variable amplitude loading. Leaf springs are essential for the suspension systems of trucks and they are considered as security relevant components in the product development phase. In order to guide the engineers in the design and testing department, a simulation method is developed as explained by Bakir et al. in a recently published SAE paper [1]. The main aim of the present study is to illustrate the validation of this simulation method for the durability of leaf springs based on the results from testing and measurements. In order to verify this CAE Method, the calculated stresses on the leaf springs are compared with the results of strain gage measurements and the fatigue failures of leaf springs are correlated with the calculated damage values.
2017-05-10
Technical Paper
2017-01-1931
Christian Ballarin, Martin Zeilinger
Due to the continuous increasing highway transport and the decreasing investments into infrastructure a better usage of the installed infrastructure is indispensable. Therefore the operation and interoperation of assistance and telematics systems become more and more necessary. Regarding these facts Highway Pilot was developed at Daimler Trucks. The Highway Pilot System moves the truck highly automated and independent from other road users within the allowed speed range and the required security distance. Daimler Trucks owns diverse permissions in Germany and the USA for testing these technologies on public roads. Next generation is the Highway Pilot Connect System that connects three highly automated driving trucks. The connection is established via Vehicle-to-Vehicle communication (V2V).
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1834
Florian Fink, Gregor Koners
Abstract This paper describes the prediction process of wheel forces and moments via indirect transfer path analysis, followed by an analysis of the influence of wheel variants and suspension modifications. It proposes a method to calculate transmission of noise to the vehicle interior where wheel forces and especially moments were taken into account. The calculation is based on an indirect transfer path analysis with geometrical modifications of the frequency response functions. To generate high quality broadband results, this paper also points out some of the main clearance cutting criteria. The method has been successfully implemented to show the influence of wheel tire combinations as well as the influence of suspension modifications. Case studies have been performed and will be presented in this paper. Operational noise and vibration measurements have been carried out on Daimler NVH test tracks. The frequency response functions were estimated in an acoustic laboratory.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1107
Christoph Andre Malonga Makosi, Stephan Rinderknecht, Ralf Binz, Frank Uphaus, Frank Kirschbaum
Abstract In order to offer a wide range of driving experiences to their customers, original equipment manufacturers implement different driving programs. The driver is capable of manually switching between these programs which alter drivability parameters in the engine control unit. As a result, acceleration forces and gradients are modified, changing the perceived driving experience. Nowadays, drivability is calibrated iteratively through road testing. Hence, the resulting set of parameters incorporated within the engine control unit is strongly dependent on the individual sentiments and decisions of the test engineers. It is shown, that implementing a set of objective criteria offers a way to reduce the influences of personal preferences and sentiments in the drivability calibration process. In combination with the expertise of the test engineers, the desired vehicle behavior can be formalized into a transient set point sequence to give final shape to the acceleration behavior.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2065
Albert Albers, Rui Cai, Rainer Spengler, Christian Olfens, Matthias Behrendt
Abstract The driving comfort influences the customer purchase decision; hence it is an important aspect for the vehicle development. To better quantify the comfort level and reduce the experiment costs in the development process, the subjective comfort assessment by test drivers is nowadays more and more replaced by the objective comfort evaluation. Hereby the vibration comfort is described by scalar objective characteristic parameters that correlate with the subjective assessments. The correlation analysis requires the assessments and measurements at different vehicle vibration. To determine the objective parameters regarding the powertrain excitations, most experiments in the previous studies were carried out in several test vehicles with different powertrain units.
2014-06-30
Journal Article
2014-01-2075
Gregor Koners, Ralf Lehmann
Abstract Low interior noise levels in combination with a comfortable sound is an important task for passenger cars. Due to the reduction of many noise sources over the last decades, nowadays tire-road noise has become one of the dominant sources for the interior noise. Especially for manufactures of luxury cars, the reduction of tire-road noise is a big challenge and therefore a central part of NVH development. The knowledge of the noise transmission behavior based on the characteristics of the relevant sources is a fundamental of a modern NVH - development process. For tire-road noise the source characteristics can be described by wheel forces and radiated airborne noise. In combination with the related vehicle transfer functions it is possible to describe the noise transmission behavior in detail. A method for estimating wheel forces and radiated airborne noise is presented.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0316
Jochen Sang, Massimo Venturi, Ralf Bocksch
Fuel cells convert a fuel together with oxygen in a highly efficient electrochemical reaction to electricity and water. Automotive fuel cell systems mainly use compressed onboard stored hydrogen as fuel. Oxygen from ambient air is fed to the cathode of the fuel cell stack by an air supply subsystem. For its current and next generation air supply subsystem NuCellSys has employed screw type compressor technology, which in the automotive area initially was developed for supercharged internal combustion (IC) engines. As NVH expectations to fuel cell vehicles differ very much from IC-engine driven vehicles, specific efforts have to be taken to address the intense noise and vibration profile of the screw compressor. This paper describes different counter measures which have been implemented into the NuCellSys next generation air supply subsystem.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0462
Tim McGuire, Taylor Roche, Andreas Weinberger, Peter Friebe, Juergen Friedrich
Daimler is an industry leader in the development and deployment of fuel cell vehicles. With more than 100 fuel cell vehicles being driven worldwide at locations including the U.S., Singapore, Japan, Europe, China, and Australia, Daimler currently operates the world's largest fuel cell vehicle fleet. Each fuel cell vehicle is equipped with a powerful telematics system that records a diverse set of vehicle operation and fuel cell specific data for development purposes. Through innovative analysis methods Daimler is gaining unique insight into the technical, environmental, societal, and logistic influences impacting the future of fuel cell vehicle technology.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0447
Ralf Moos, Cedric Zimmermann, Thomas Birkhofer, Aleksandar Knezevic, Carsten Plog, Michael Rainer Busch, Thomas Ried
In order to control NOx reduction with NOx storing lean NOx traps (LNT), a gas sensor downstream of the LNT is presently preferred. It is a disadvantage that no means are available to gauge directly the LNT NOx loading level and the catalyst quality. The presented novel sensor consists of interdigital electrodes that are deposited on a planar substrate. On its reverse side, a temperature sensor is applied. Both sides are covered with the original catalyst coating, allowing detecting directly electrical impedance and temperature of the coating. Such sensors were integrated in different positions of an LNT. It is shown in synthetic exhausts as well as in engine tests that in-situ measurements of the electrical impedance of the LNT coating are appropriate to determine directly the catalyst status. Hence, the local degree of NOx loading as well as the local regeneration status can be measured. Furthermore, sulfur poisoning, desulfurization, and thermal ageing can be directly seen.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0445
G. C. Koltsakis, C. K. Dardiotis, Z. C. Samaras, M. Frey, G. Wenninger, B. Krutzsch, O. A. Haralampous
Catalyzed wall-flow particulate filters are increasingly applied in diesel exhaust after-treatment for multiple purposes, including low-temperature catalytic regeneration, CO and hydrocarbon conversion, as well as exothermic heat generation during forced regeneration. In order to optimize Precious Metals usage, it may be advantageous to apply the catalytic coating non-uniformly in the DPF, a technology referred to as “catalyst zoning”. In order to simulate the behavior of such a filter, one has to consider coupled transport-reaction modeling. In this work, a previously developed model is calibrated versus experimental data obtained with full-scale catalyzed filters on the engine dynamometer. In a next step, the model is validated under a variety of operating conditions using engine experiments with zoned filters. The performance of the zoned catalyst is analyzed by examining the transient temperature and species profiles in the inlet and outlet channels.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0208
Joerg Weber
An approach will be presented how development projects for safety-related and software-intensive automotive systems can be controlled through the application of model-based risk assessment. Therefore specific control measures have to be developed, which represent the degree of fulfilment of several aspects of safety-related developments. The control measures are evaluated through the analysis of risk-reducing aspects, for which the process of identification and specification is described. Thus, a framework for the creation of a probabilistic and aspect-oriented risk-analysis model (AORA) for safety related projects within automotive industries is currently under development. With respect to the upcoming safety standard ISO 26262 the twofold approach focuses on both, the identification and specification of risk-reducing aspects within the development as well as the application of a probabilistic reasoning model.
2009-10-01
Technical Paper
2009-01-3068
Heinrich Reister, Thomas Binner, Joshua Enriquez-Geppert, Robert Goldschmidt
In this study the numerical simulation of the flow through an alternator inside an engine compartment of a passenger car is investigated. Specifically the interaction of the flow through the alternator with the flow through the engine compartment is explored in detail. The results are compared with a corresponding numerical simulation of an alternator in a surrounding of a test facility and with a numerical simulation of the flow through an engine compartment without taking into account the internal flow through the alternator. Finally the air temperature near the alternator and also the temperature of some components inside the alternator are compared with experimental values measured during a typical load case used for the thermal protection of the passenger car.
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