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Viewing 1 to 30 of 115
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0564
Lucien Koopmans, Johan Wallesten, Roy Ogink, Ingemar Denbratt
To elucidate the processes controlling the auto-ignition timing and overall combustion duration in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, the distribution of the auto-ignition sites, in both space and time, was studied. The auto-ignition locations were investigated using optical diagnosis of HCCI combustion, based on laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of formaldehyde in an optical engine with fully variable valve actuation. This engine was operated in two different modes of HCCI. In the first, auto-ignition temperatures were reached by heating the inlet air, while in the second, residual mass from the previous combustion cycle was trapped using a negative valve overlap. The fuel was introduced directly into the combustion chamber in both approaches. To complement these experiments, 3-D numerical modeling of the gas exchange and compression stroke events was done for both HCCI-generating approaches.
2004-06-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1967
Lucien Koopmans, Elna Strömberg, Ingemar Denbratt
A single-cylinder engine was operated in HCCI combustion mode with different kinds of commercial fuels. The HCCI combustion was generated by creating a negative valve overlap (early exhaust valve closing combined with late intake valve opening) thus trapping a large amount of residuals (∼ 55%). Fifteen different fuels with high octane numbers were tested six of which were primary reference fuels (PRF's) and nine were commercial fuels or reference fuels. The engine was operated at constant operational parameters (speed/load, valve timing and equivalence ratio, intake air temperature, compression ratio, etc.) changing only the fuel type while the engine was running. Changing the fuel affected the auto-ignition timing, represented by the 50% mass fraction burned location (CA50). However these changes were not consistent with the classical RON and MON numbers, which are measures of the knock resistance of the fuel. Indeed, no correlation was found between CA50 and the RON or MON numbers.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0609
Alaa Omrane, Greger Juhlin, Marcus Aldén, Göran Josefsson, Johan Engström, Timothy Benham
Thermographic phosphors thermometry was used to measure engine valves and transparent piston temperatures in two dimensions as well point wise of a running, optically accessible, gasoline direct injection engine. The engine, fueled with isooctane, was operated in continuous and skip-fire mode at 1200 and 2000 rpm. A calibration of the phosphorescence lifetime and spectral properties against temperature allowed temperature measurements between 25 and 600°C. Results from the measurements show the potential of the technique for two-dimensional mapping of engine walls, valves and piston temperatures inside the cylinder.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0713
Martin Törngren, Niklas Adamsson, Per Johannessen
Model based development promises to facilitate the development of embedded control systems, including design, early verification and validation as well as implementation. Existing tools are beginning to support the development of distributed control systems. There are however still challenges when it comes to integration with mechanics and methodologies for such interdisciplinary systems.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1522
Magnus Knutsson, Johan Lennblad, Hans Bodén, Mats Abom
Analysis of pressure pulsations in ducts is an active research field within the automotive industry. The fluid dynamics and the wave transmission properties of internal combustion (IC) engine intake and exhaust systems contribute to the energy efficiency of the engines and are hence important for the final amount of CO₂ that is emitted from the vehicles. Sound waves, originating from the pressure pulses caused by the in- and outflow at the engine valves, are transmitted through the intake and exhaust system and are an important cause of noise pollution from road traffic at low speeds. Reliable prediction methods are of major importance to enable effective optimization of gas exchange systems. The use of nonlinear one-dimensional (1D) gas dynamics simulation software packages is widespread within the automotive industry.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1674
Magnus Olsson, Mikael Törmänen, Sylvain Sauvage, Catharina Hansen
In modern vehicles, each system must meet tough demands to fulfill the many different attribute requirements, design constraints and manufacturing limitations. It becomes difficult and time-consuming to find an optimal and robust design using a traditional engineering process. Volvo Cars has for several years been using Multi-Disciplinary Optimization, MDO, that basically shows the customer attributes levels, such as NVH, ride comfort, and driveability as a function of different parameter configurations. This greatly facilitates project team understanding of the limitations and possibilities of the different systems, and has become a key enabler to achieving a good balance between different attributes. Traditionally, this type of comprehensive Design of Experiments (DOE) optimization demands huge time and computer resources. Frequently, experimental designs will not fulfill manufacturing limitations or attribute targets, making this decision process slow, tedious, and fruitless.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1569
Andrzej Pietrzyk
A broad measurement campaign was run at Volvo aiming at the evaluation of dispersion in test-based NVH characteristics of a car body and at the derivation of reference data for judging the accuracy of CAE predictions. Within this work 6, nominally identical, vehicles were tested. Tests included operational noise on Complete Vehicle (CV) level (road noise, engine noise and idling noise), NTF, VTF & Acoustic FRF measurements in CV, Trimmed Body (TB) & TB-Stripped (TBS) configurations. Additionally, modal analysis and NTF, VTF, AFRF tests were carried out on 4 BIPs of the same vehicle type. Further, limited tests were carried out on 28 vehicles of the same type. The aim of the work was to study the development of dispersion with increasing complexity of the test object, from the BIP to TB and CV.
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3490
Lisa Jacobsson, Ernst Winklhofer, Jerzy Chomiak
A series of experimental studies of diesel spray and combustion characteristics was carried out using circular, elliptic and step orifices. The experiment was performed on a 3-litre single-cylinder engine with optical access. In the engine tests, an elliptic-orifice nozzle with an aspect ratio of approximately 2:1, and a step-orifice nozzle were compared with circular-orifice nozzles. All orifices had sharp-edged inlets. The nozzles were tested at injection pressures extending from 300 to 1300 bar. The nozzles were evaluated in respect of initial spray tip velocity, penetration, spray cone angle, spray width, intermittency and heat-release. Substantial differences were observed in the spray characteristics: At an injection pressure of 300 bar, the spray width increased twice as fast in the minor axis plane of the elliptic orifice and step orifice than the circular orifices.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0873
Sven Perzon, Lars Davidson
The accuracy of computational fluid dynamics, CFD, has improved considerably over the years but still, large errors are present and vehicle parameters such as drag and lift are often poorly predicted. The current work is investigating how transient CFD would cope with a very complex flow structure around a surface mounted cube. A transient Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes model, RANS model, is presented together with a large eddy simulation model, LES model. Furthermore, two “industrial like” test cases have been simulated using a transient RANS model.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0977
Dag Aronson, Zenitha Chroneer, Per Elofsson, Henrik Fellbom
Numerical simulations of the flow inside a passenger compartment are compared with experimental data obtained from velocity field measurements using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Comparisons are made in the front part of the passenger compartment with the air-distribution system operated in a ventilation mode. The sensitivty of the CFD-model to the boundary conditions was investigated and two different turbulence models were tested. Computations and experiments resulted in similar results for the overall flow field, however, rather large differences were found in the vertical spreading of the jet from the dashboard nozzle. The width of the jet was lower in the measurements than in the simulations. This difference is believed to be caused by the high diffusivity obtained when using a k-epsilon model in combination with an unstructured grid.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0485
Dag Aronson, Sami Ben Brahim, Sven Perzon
The demand for more energy efficient vehicles is driven by environmental considerations and alternative engine technology. In order to reduce fuel consumption on future vehicles the power needed to propel the car has to be lowered. Hence, considerable efforts are needed to improve the aerodynamics. For a modern vehicle the potential for further improvements on drag is mainly to be found in the underbody region, Howell (1991). This requires more knowledge of the underbody flow and the flow around the wheels. In the present work the flow in the underbody region has been studied using a combination of experiments and calculations to obtain a more comprehensive database. The model chosen for this work was the so called ASMO model from Daimler Benz, which is a well known geometry that is available for the public on the internet. A simple model was preferred since the goal was to study the basic mechanisms behind drag generated by the underbody flow.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0486
Mark Bannister
This paper gives details of the drag and dirt deposition mechanisms related to rear view mirrors. The major design parameters affecting mirror-generated drag and dirt deposition are described. A detailed analysis of the mirror noise properties is not covered for reasons of brevity. A range of test methods is also described which can be successfully used in the mirror optimisation process. The detailed drag breakdown of several rear view mirrors has been made by use of a combination of balance and pressure measurements. The drag breakdown gives an insight into the drag mechanisms and identifies the critical geometry parameters. It is concluded that the relatively high level of drag experienced by some of today's mirrors is primarily the result of premature tip separation and/or an unnecessarily large mirror foot. A level of drag close to the minimum possible, for a given mirror glass area, can be achieved by optimisation of the tip and foot areas.
1999-09-28
Technical Paper
1999-01-3147
Johnny K Larsson, Lutz Hanicke
In May 1998 Volvo launched its most exclusive car model so far, the Volvo S80, which is aimed to compete with upper luxury segment products. The car is produced in the new production facility in the Torslanda plant in Sweden. Among the more highlighted features were a transversely mounted in-line six cylinder engine with a specially designed gearbox, electronic multiplex technology with 18 computers in the network, and safety features like stability and traction control (STC), front seats with integrated antiwhiplash system (WHIPS) and inflatable curtain (IC) for improved side impact protection. To fulfill the product's high demands on safety, quality and environmental care, the design, materials selection and assembly of the car body with high precision had to be very carefully engineered. As in previous product-/process development a holistic and concurrent engineering approach was necessary.
2011-09-11
Journal Article
2011-24-0054
Andreas W. Berntsson, Göran Josefsson, Roy Ekdahl, Roy Ogink, Börje Grandin
Direct gasoline injection combined with turbo charging and down sizing is a cost effective concept to meet future requirements for emission reduction as well as increased efficiency for passenger cars. It is well known that turbulence induced by in-cylinder air motion can influence efficiency. In this study, the intake-generated flow field was varied for a direct injected turbo charged concept, with the intent to evaluate if further increase in tumble potentially could lead to higher efficiency compared to the baseline. A single cylinder head with flow separating walls in the intake ports and different restriction plates was used to allow different levels of tumble to be experimentally evaluated in a single cylinder engine. The different levels of tumble were quantified by flow rig experiments.
2011-06-09
Technical Paper
2011-37-0013
Klaas Burgdorf
Maintaining the current ratio between certified and the customer-observed fuel consumption even with future required levels poses a considerable challenge. Increasing the efficiency of the driveline enables certified fuel consumption down to a feasible level in the order of 80 g CO₂/km using fossil fuels. Mainly affecting off-cycle fuel consumption, energy amounts used to create good interior climate as well as energy-consuming options and features threaten to further increase. Progressing urbanization will lead to decreasing average vehicle speeds and driving distances. Highly efficient powertrains come with decreased amounts of waste energy traditionally used for interior climate conditioning, thus making necessary a change of auxiliary systems.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0200
S. Etemad, J. Wallesten, C.F. Stein, S. Eriksson, K. Johansson
It is demonstrated that the cycle averaged heat flux on the hot gas side of the cylinders can be obtained using in-cylinder CFD-analysis. Together with the heat transfer coefficient obtained from the coolant jacket CFD-analysis, a complete set of boundary conditions are made available exclusively based on simulations. The engine metal temperatures could then be predicted using FEA and the results are compared to an extensive set of measured data. Also 1-D codes are used to provide cooling circuit boundary conditions and gas exchange boundary condition for the CFD-models. The predicted temperature distribution in the engine is desirable for accurate and reliable prediction of knock, durability problems, bore distortion and valve seat distortion.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0130
H. Persson, R. Pfeiffer, A. Hultqvist, B. Johansson, H. Ström
A naturally aspirated in-line six-cylinder 2.9-litre Volvo engine is operated in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode, using camshafts with low lift and short duration generating negative valve overlap. Standard port fuel injection is used and pistons and cylinder head are unchanged from the automotive application. HCCI through negative valve overlap is recognized as one of the possible implementation strategies of HCCI closest to production. It is important to gain knowledge of the constraints and limits on the possible operating region. In this work, the emphasis is on investigating how cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder deviations limit the operating region, how these effects change in different parts of the operating region and how they can be controlled. At low load the cycle-to-cycle phenomena cause periodic behavior in combustion timing; together with cylinder deviations this is found responsible for decreasing the operating regime.
2012-06-13
Technical Paper
2012-01-1559
Sabry Allam, Magnus Knutsson, Hans Boden
Automotive turbo compressors generate high frequency noise in the air intake system. This sound generation is of importance for the perceived sound quality of luxury cars and may need to be controlled by the use of silencers. The silencers usually contain resonators with slits, perforates and cavities. The purpose of the present work is to develop acoustic models for these resonators where relevant effects such as the effect of a realistic mean flow on losses and 3D effects are considered. An experimental campaign has been performed where the two-port matrices and transmission loss of sample resonators have been measured without flow and for two different mean flow speeds. Models for two resonators have been developed using 1D linear acoustic theory and a FEM code (COMSOL Multi-physics). For some resonators a separate linear 1D Matlab code has also been developed.
2012-09-10
Technical Paper
2012-01-1572
Fredrik B. Ekstrom, Joop Somhorst
Passenger cars equipped with diesel engines will meet challenging emission legislation for the coming decade, with introduction of Euro6 and Euro7, which comprises reduced NOX emissions and possibly new driving cycles including off-cycle limits. The technology measures to meet these legislative limits comprise a broad spectrum of engine and aftertreatment, i.e., engine measures such as improved fuel injection with respect to mass and timing, improved exhaust gas recirculation, improved warm-up and reduced friction, as well as aftertreatment measures such as selective catalytic reduction and lean NOX trap in combination with diesel particulate filter, and the thereby associated engine control. The resulting technology matrix is therefore large, and calls for a multidisciplinary simulation approach for appropriate selection and optimization of technology and control with the objectives and constraints of emissions, fuel consumption, performance and cost.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0732
Jessica Dahlstrom, Oivind Andersson, Martin Tuner, Håkan Persson
Abstract Heat loss is one of the greatest energy losses in engines. More than half of the heat is lost to cooling media and exhaust losses, and they thus dominate the internal combustion engine energy balance. Complex processes affect heat loss to the cylinder walls, including gas motion, spray-wall interaction and turbulence levels. The aim of this work was to experimentally compare the heat transfer characteristics of a stepped-bowl piston geometry to a conventional re-entrant diesel bowl studied previously and here used as the baseline geometry. The stepped-bowl geometry features a low surface-to-volume ratio compared to the baseline bowl, which is considered beneficial for low heat losses. Speed, load, injection pressure, swirl level, EGR rate and air/fuel ratio (λ) were varied in a multi-cylinder light duty engine operated in conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode.
2014-11-01
Journal Article
2014-01-9129
Filip Nielsen, Åsa Uddheim, Jan-Olof Dalenbäck
Abstract Fuel consumption of vehicles has received increased attention in recent years; however one neglected area that can have a large effect on this is the energy usage for the interior climate. This study aims to investigate the energy usage for the interior climate for different conditions by measurements on a complete vehicle. Twelve different NEDC tests in different temperatures and thermal states of the vehicle were completed in a climatic wind tunnel. Furthermore one temperature sweep from 43° to −18°C was also performed. The measurements focused on the heat flow of the air, from its sources, to its sink, i.e. compartment. In addition the electrical and mechanical loads of the climate system were included. The different sources of heating and cooling were, for the tested powertrain, waste heat from the engine, a fuel operated heater, heat pickup of the air, evaporator cooling and cooling from recirculation.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1786
Per Alenius, Magnus Olsson, Thomas Lindbom
Abstract Highly refined NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness) is a key attribute for premium segment passenger cars. All noise sources such as powertrain, tires, wind, climate unit and etc. must be well balanced and at such a low level that the customer expectations are met or exceeded. However, not only are the NVH levels of importance but the character of the noise must also meet the high demands from premium car customers. This is especially true for diesel engines which historically have been more prone to have a less refined engine noise character than petrol engines. This paper will describe an investigation of what is defined as “engine presence” in four-cylinder diesel engine cars. The scope is to define a method for consistent subjective assessment of engine presence and to find the relationship and investigate the correlation between the “perceived loudness”, “perceived harshness” and the overall engine presence interior of the car.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0028
Ali Shahrokni, Peter Gergely, Jan Söderberg, Patrizio Pelliccione
Abstract In areas such as Active Safety, new technologies, designs (e.g. AUTOSAR) and methods are introduced at a rapid pace. To address the new demands, and also requirements on Functional Safety imposed by ISO 26262, the support for engineering methods, including tools and data management, needs to evolve as well. Generic and file-based data management tools, like spreadsheet tools, are popular in the industry due to their flexibility and legacy in the industry but provide poor control and traceability, while rigid and special-purpose tools provide structure and control of data but with limited evolvability. As organizations become agile, the need for flexible data management increases. Since products become more complex and developed in larger and distributed teams, the need for more unified, controlled, and consistent data increases.
2014-06-30
Journal Article
2014-01-2060
Raimo Kabral, Lin Du, Mats Åbom, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract Current trends for IC-engines are driving the development of more efficient engines with higher specific power. This is true for both light and heavy duty vehicles and has led to an increased use of super-charging. The super-charging can be both in the form of a single or multi-stage turbo-charger driven by exhaust gases, or via a directly driven compressor. In both cases a possible noise problem can be a strong Blade Passing Frequency (BPF) typically in the kHz range and above the plane wave range. In this paper a novel type of compact dissipative silencer developed especially to handle this type of problem is described and optimized. The silencer is based on a combination of a micro-perforated (MPP) tube backed by a locally reacting cavity. The combined impedance of micro-perforate and cavity is chosen to match the theoretical optimum known as the Cremer impedance at the mid-frequency in the frequency range of interest.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0097
Lasse Christoffersen, David Söderblom, Lennart Löfdahl, Anders Jönson
During the development of the aerodynamic properties of fore coming road vehicles down scaled models are often used in the initial phase. However, if scale models are to be utilised even further in the aerodynamic development they have to include geometrical representatives of most of the components found in the real vehicle. As the cooling package is one of the biggest single generators of aerodynamic drag the heat exchangers are essential to include in a wind tunnel model. However, due mainly to limitations in manufacturing techniques it is complicated to make a down scaled heat exchanger and instead functional dummy heat exchangers have to be developed for scaled wind tunnel models. In this work a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code has been used to show that it is important that the simplified heat exchanger model has to be of comparable size to that of the full scale unit.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0127
Fredrik Törner, D. J. Chen, Rolf Johansson, Henrik Lönn, Martin Törngren
Automotive electronic systems are becoming safety related causing a need for more systematic and stringent approaches for demonstrating the functional safety. The safety case consists of an argumentation, supported by evidence, of why the system is safe to operate in a given context. It is dependent on referencing and aggregating information which is part of the EAST-ADL2, an architecture description language for automotive embedded systems. This paper explores the possibilities of integrating the safety case metamodel with the EAST-ADL2, enabling safety case development in close connection to the system model. This is done by including a safety case object in EAST-ADL2, and defining the external and internal relations.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0426
Daniel Dahl, Ingemar Denbratt, Lucien Koopmans
Future pressures to reduce the fuel consumption of passenger cars may require the exploitation of alternative combustion strategies for gasoline engines to replace, or use in combination with the conventional stoichiometric spark ignition (SSI) strategy. Possible options include homogeneous lean charge spark ignition (HLCSI), stratified charge spark ignition (SCSI) and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), all of which are intended to reduce pumping and thermal losses. In the work presented here four different combustion strategies were evaluated using the same engine: SSI, HLCSI, SCSI and HCCI. HLCSI was achieved by early injection and operating the engine lean, close to its stability limits. SCSI was achieved using the spray-guided technique with a centrally placed multi-hole injector and spark-plug. HCCI was achieved using a negative valve overlap to trap hot residuals and thus generate auto-ignition temperatures at the end of the compression stroke.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-1450
Öivind Andersson, Joop Somhorst, Ronny Lindgren, Roger Blom, Mattias Ljungqvist
The development of a new combustion system for a light-duty diesel engine is presented. The soot-NOx trade-off is significantly improved with maintained or improved efficiency. This is accomplished only by altering the combustion chamber geometry, and thereby the in-cylinder flow. The bowl geometry is developed in CFD and validated in single cylinder tests. Tests and simulations align remarkably well. Under identical conditions in the engine the new combustion chamber decreases smoke by 11-27%, NOx by 2-11%, and maintains efficiency as compared to the baseline geometry. The injector nozzle is matched to the new bowl using design of experiments (DoE). By this method transfer functions are obtained that can be used to optimize the system using analytical tools. The emissions show a complex dependence on the nozzle geometry. The emission dependence on nozzle geometry varies greatly over the engine operating range.
2009-06-15
Technical Paper
2009-01-1785
Daniel Dahl, Mats Andersson, Andreas Berntsson, Ingemar Denbratt, Lucien Koopmans
Future demands for improvements in the fuel economy of gasoline passenger car engines will require the development and implementation of advanced combustion strategies, to replace, or combine with the conventional spark ignition strategy. One possible strategy is homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) achieved using negative valve overlap (NVO). However, several issues need to be addressed before this combustion strategy can be fully implemented in a production vehicle, one being to increase the upper load limit. One constraint at high loads is the combustion becoming too rapid, leading to excessive pressure-rise rates and large pressure fluctuations (ringing), causing noise. In this work, efforts were made to reduce these pressure fluctuations by using a late injection during the later part of the compression. A more appropriate acronym than HCCI for such combustion is SCCI (Stratified Charge Compression Ignition).
2007-01-23
Technical Paper
2007-01-0009
Martin Larsson, Ingemar Denbratt, Lucien Koopmans
Ion current sensors have high potential utility for obtaining feedback signals directly from the combustion chamber in internal combustion engines. This paper describes experiments performed in a single-cylinder optical engine operated in HCCI mode with negative valve overlap to explore this potential. A high-speed CCD camera was used to visualize the combustion progress in the cylinder, and the photographs obtained were compared with the ion current signals. The optical data indicate that the ions responsible for the chemiluminescence from the HCCI combustion have to be in contact with the sensing electrode for an ion current to start flowing through the measurement circuit. This also means that there will be an offset between the time at which 50% of the fuel mass has burned and 50% of the ion current peak value is reached, which is readily explained by the results presented in the paper.
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