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Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Based on your test data or process data, do you ever wonder if: An improved product really performs better? A substitute material really processes the same? A cheaper material really performs satisfactorily? What confidence do you have in the final decision that you make? This seminar will help individuals responsible for product or process development and testing to statistically assess the variation of the product or process performance and make effective decisions with confidence.
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
This interactive Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) product and process seminar introduces the participant to the analytical process by which potential failure modes, failure effects and causes of failure are identified. Engaging in a systematic method of studying failure can improve future outcomes. The severity, occurrence and probability of detection of a failure mode are used to prioritize which failure modes are most critical. Methodology is introduced for dealing with the effects of failure. The Design FMEA link to manufacturing is explained and amplified in terms of downstream Process FMEA.
2018-08-15 ...
  • August 15-17, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • December 10-12, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
RMS (Reliability-Maintainability-Safety-Supportability) engineering is emerging as the newest discipline in product development due to new credible, accurate, quantitative methods. Weibull Analysis is foremost among these new tools. New and advanced Weibull techniques are a significant improvement over the original Weibull approach. This workshop, originally developed by Dr. Bob Abernethy, presents special methods developed for these data problems, such as Weibayes, with actual case studies in addition to the latest techniques in SuperSMITH® Weibull for risk forecasts with renewal and optimal component replacement.
2018-06-11 ...
  • June 11-22, 2018 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 28-December 10, 2018 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used by engineers as a design tool in new product development since the early 1990's. Until recently, most FEA applications have been limited to static analysis due to the cost and complexity of advanced types of analyses. Progress in the commercial FEA software and in computing hardware has now made it practical to use advanced types as an everyday design tool of design engineers. In addition, competitive pressures and quality requirements demand a more in-depth understanding of product behavior under real life loading conditions.
2018-06-04 ...
  • June 4-8, 2018 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 27-30, 2018 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Design Review Based on Failure Modes (DRBFM) is a methodology focused on change management and continuous improvement. It centers on early prevention and engineering knowledge, eliminating time spent debating ranking systems, waiting for lead engineers to document and list their concerns, identifying what types of concerns are open for discussion and resolution, and brainstorming without any actionable closure. This web seminar will explain all phases of the DRBFM methodology and provide details on how to accomplish the specific steps.
2018-05-14 ...
  • May 14-25, 2018 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
  • October 29-November 9, 2018 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been widely implemented by automotive companies and is used by design engineers as a tool during the product development process. Design engineers analyze their own designs while they are still in the form of easily modifiable CAD models to allow for quick turnaround times and to ensure prompt implementation of analysis results in the design process.
2018-04-30 ...
  • April 30-May 11, 2018 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
  • July 30-August 10, 2018 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is an integral part of product design activity applicable to any type of product or service. It is a qualitative and quantitative step-by-step approach for identifying and analyzing all actual and potential points of failure in a design, product or service. A successful team-based FMEA activity can use their collective experience with similar products to dramatically improve not only product performance but also reduce manufacturing issues at both a component and system and processing level. This web seminar introduces the five basic types of FMEAs with emphasis on constructing a Design FMEA.
2018-04-17 ...
  • April 17-18, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
This course provides a detailed description of tire failure modes, their potential causes, identification, and the sometimes subtle nuances that go along with determination of tire failure. In addition, proper inspection techniques of tires will be discussed and samples will be available to reinforce the concepts learned. The book, Tire Forensic Investigation, authored by the instructor, is included with the course materials. This course has been approved by the Accreditation Commission for Traffic Accident Reconstruction (ACTAR) for 13 Continuing Education Units (CEUs).
2018-04-17 ...
  • April 17-May 1, 2018 (5 Sessions) - Live Online
  • August 7-21, 2018 (5 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Materials degradation from environmental conditions is a common factor that will often occur in mechanical equipment used in every type of environment. These processes can frequently materialize in unpredicted and harmful ways, especially when they interact and lead to early component damage or failure. This five-session course will summarize the mechanisms that cause materials and mechanical components to degrade in service through exposure to deleterious mechanical and environmental conditions.
2018-04-12 ...
  • April 12-13, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a systematic method for preventing failure through the discovery and mitigation of potential failure modes and their cause mechanisms. Actions are developed in a team environment and address each high: severity, occurrence or detection ranking indicated by the analysis. Completed FMEA actions result in improved product performance, reduced warranty and increased product quality.
2018-03-26 ...
  • March 26-27, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • August 9-10, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Greenville, South Carolina
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Engine failures can occur in a variety of equipment, vehicles, and applications. On occasion, a single vehicle type or equipment family will even experience multiple engine failures leading to the inevitable need to determine what the most likely cause of one or all of those failures was. This comprehensive seminar introduces participants to the methods and techniques used to understand the types of variables and inputs that can affect engine reliability and then determine the most likely cause of an individual engine or group of engine failures in the field.
2018-03-08 ...
  • March 8-9, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Toulouse, France
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
This seminar covers the five types of FMEAs with emphasis on constructing Design and Process FMEAs. Each column of the FMEA document will be clearly explained using an actual FMEA example. The course covers various methods for identifying failure modes, effects and causes with special attention given to severity, occurrence, and detection tables and how to develop effective recommended actions strategies. Throughout the class, participants will be involved in exercises/actual projects that demonstrate and incorporate direct application of learned principles.
2018-02-05 ...
  • February 5-9, 2018 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
  • June 4-8, 2018 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is a powerful and well recognized tool used in the analysis of heat transfer problems. However, FEA can only analyze solid bodies and, by necessity thermal analysis with FEA is limited to conductive heat transfer. The other two types of heat transfer: convection and radiation must by approximated by boundary conditions. Modeling all three mechanisms of heat transfer without arbitrary assumption requires a combined use of FEA and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).
2018-01-22 ...
  • January 22-26, 2018 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
  • May 29-June 1, 2018 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been an indispensable tool for design simulation for several decades but this wide spread use has been limited to simple types of analyses. Relatively recently, more advanced analyses have given easy to use interfaces enabling design engineers to simulate problems formerly reserved for analysts. This three-session web seminar targets the FEA users who wish to explore those advanced analysis capabilities.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0372
Baoyu Wu, Guo Xuexun, Jun Yan, Qi Sun
Speed ratio and clamping force are two of the metal-belt CVT control targets. Conventional control strategies can not correspond to the driver's intention or provide various driving environment. A fuzzy logic ratio control algorithm and a fuzzy logic clamping force control algorithm for a metal-belt CVT are proposed. Nevertheless, high-quality fuzzy control rule base and factors of FLC are difficult to gain because repeated tests and experts' experience are needed. Therefore, genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced to optimize the fuzzy control algorithms. Using the optimized fuzzy control algorithms, Metal-belt CVT control simulations were implemented. The results show that a faster response and better robustness can be gained when compared with those of the PID control.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0344
Gilsu Choi, Zhuxian Xu, Ming Li, Shiv Gupta, Thomas Jahns, Fred Wang, Neil A. Duffie, Laura Marlino
This paper introduces a promising approach for developing an integrated traction motor drive based on the Integrated Modular Motor Drive (IMMD) concept. The IMMD concept strives to meet aggressive power density and performance targets by modularizing both the machine and power electronics and then integrating them into a single combined machine-plus-drive structure. Physical integration of the power electronics inside the machine makes it highly desirable to increase the power electronics operating temperature including higher power semiconductor junction temperatures and improved device packaging. Recent progress towards implementing the IMMD concept in an integrated traction motor drive is summarized in this paper. Several candidate permanent magnet (PM) machine configurations with different numbers of phases between 3 and 6 are analyzed to compare their performance characteristics and key application features.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0268
Jeffery R. Anderson, E. Harry Law
Traditional Electronic Stability Control (ESC) for automobiles is usually accomplished through the use of estimated vehicle dynamics from simplified models that rely on parameters such as cornering stiffness that can change with the vehicle state and time. This paper proposes a different method for electronic stability control of oversteer by predicting the degree of instability in a vehicle. The algorithm is solely based on measurable response characteristics including lateral acceleration, yaw rate, speed, and driver steering input. These signals are appropriately conditioned and evaluated with fuzzy logic to determine the degree of instability present. When the “degree of instability” passes a certain threshold, the appropriate control action is applied to the vehicle in the form of differential yaw braking. Using only the measured response of the vehicle alleviates the problem of degraded performance when vehicle parameters change.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0437
Mina M.S. Kaldas, Roman Henze, Ferit Küçükay
Due to the importance of the fast transportation under every circumstance, the transportation process may require a high speed heavy vehicle from time to time, which may turn the transportation process more unsafe. Due to that fact the truck safety during braking and the ride comfort during long distance travelling with high speeds should be improved. Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop a control system which combines the suspension and braking systems. The control system consists of three controllers; the first one for the active suspension system of the truck body and cab, the second one for the ABS and, the third for the integrated control system between the active suspension system and the ABS. The control strategy is also separated into two strategies.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0431
Mina M.S. Kaldas, Kemal Çalışkan, Roman Henze, Ferit Küçükay
Following the developments in controlled suspension system components, the studies on the vertical dynamics analysis of vehicles increased their popularity in recent years. The objective of this study is to develop a semi-active suspension system controller using Adaptive-Fuzzy Logic control theories together with Kalman Filter for state estimation. A quarter vehicle ride dynamics model is constructed and validated through laboratory tests performed on a hydraulic four-poster shaker. A Kalman Filter algorithm is constructed for bounce velocity estimation, and its accuracy is verified through measurements performed with external displacement sensors. The benefit of using adaptive control with Fuzzy-Logic to maintain the optimal performance over a wide range of road inputs is enhanced by the accuracy of Kalman Filter in estimating the controller inputs. A gradient-based optimization algorithm is applied for improving the Fuzzy-Logic controller parameters.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0447
Arkadeb Ghosal, Paolo Giusto, Prakash Peranandam, Purnendu Sinha, Haibo Zeng
Recent trends in the automotive industry show growing demands for the introduction of new in-vehicle features (e.g., smart-phone integration, adaptive cruise control, etc.) at increasing rates and with reduced time-to-market. New technological developments (e.g., in-vehicle Ethernet, multi-core technologies, AUTOSAR standardized software architectures, smart video and radar sensors, etc.) provide opportunities as well as challenges to automotive designers for introducing and implementing new features at lower costs, and with increased safety and security. As a result, the design of Electrical/Electronic (E/E) architectures is becoming increasingly challenging as several hardware resources are needed. In our earlier work, we have provided top-level definitions for three relevant metrics that can be used to evaluate E/E architecture alternatives in the early stages of the design process: flexibility, scalability and expandability.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0421
V. A. Muruganandam, Maruthi Dhulipudi, Uday Korde
Coolant pipes are a prime connection units present in any engines that facilitates the flow of coolant and thereby keeping the engine under its optimum operating condition. Among the several influencing factors that deteriorate engines performance, the coolant leak is also one of the contributors. This could be caused primly due to leakage issues that arises from the pipe press fit zones. Henceforth it is very important to understand the root cause of this press-fit connection failure. The present study deals with press-fit between the pipe and housing in an engine which is subjected to extreme thermal loads (min of -40°C to a max temperature of +150°C) thereby causing the press-fit loosening effect.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0411
H Pandarinath, J Sureshkumar, Ramalingam Sivanantham, S Prabhakar, S R Nagendiran
Vacuum pumps are predominantly used in diesel engines of passenger cars and trucks for generating vacuum in servo brake applications. With the emission norms getting stringent, there is a need for vacuum signal for EGR actuation, turbo-charger waste gate actuation and other servo applications. These multi-functional applications of vacuum pumps and the functional criticality in application like braking system demand an effective and reliable performance. In gasoline engines, the vacuum generated in the intake manifold is tapped for braking. The recent technology of gasoline direct injection compels the use of vacuum pump in gasoline engines also due to scarce vacuum in intake manifold. The performance of the vacuum pump is highly dependent on the opening and closing of the check valve sub-system, which is positioned between the vacuum reservoir and the pump at the suction side.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0690
Withit Chatlatanagulchai, Kittipong Yaovaja, Shinapat Rhienprayoon, Krisada Wannatong
Knock behavior in diesel-dual-fuel (DDF) engine is more complex, more severe, and different than those of traditional engines. We investigate a type of diesel-dual-fuel engines, where CNG is multipoint-injected at the intake ports as main fuel and diesel is directly injected in smaller amount, mainly for ignition purpose, resulting in lower fuel cost. Because of the mixed behaviors between the spark ignited and compression ignited engines, a more sophisticated control system is needed to properly control knock in the DDF engine. In this paper, a novel control system based on fuzzy logic is presented to regulate knock intensity at an appropriate level. The control system comprises a fuzzy controller and a fuzzy decision maker. The fuzzy controller controls several pertaining actuators using rule-base from human experience, while the fuzzy decision maker adapts the magnitude of each actuator action to various operating points.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0667
Ramesh Rebba, Jeong Hun Seo, Ann Marie Sastry, Mary Fortier
Rechargeable energy storage systems with Lithium-ion pouch cells are subject to various ambient temperature conditions and go through thousands of charge-discharge cycles during the life time of operation. The cells may change their thickness with internal heat generation, cycling and any other mechanisms. The stacked prismatic cells thus experience face pressure and this could impact the pack electrical performance. The pack consists of stiff end plates keeping the pack in tact using bolts, cooling fins to maintain cell temperature and foam padding in between cells. The pack level thermal requirements limit the amount of temperature increase during normal operating conditions. Similarly, the structural requirements state that the stresses and the deflection in the end plates should be minimal. Uncertainties in cell, foam mechanical and thermal properties might add variation to the pack performance.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0658
Juan Carlos Martinez Laurent
With the constant need to meet new environmental regulations, the improvement of automotive exhaust systems technologies to be cleaner and more effective is a necessity. To achieve these regulations the automakers have been focused on the development of better particle filters and more effective cleaning processes. Catalyst Oxidation and Diesel Particle Filter Regeneration are good and effective techniques to accomplish these objectives but the amount of heat generated by these processes is a concern in the thermal management of the vehicle. To gain a better understanding of these effects Finite Element Thermal Analysis has proved to be a useful tool to predict and observe the increment of temperature during these processes. This work is focus on a simulation process using several 1-D and 3-D techniques to predict the skin exhaust temperature during the regeneration process moment in which the system achieve the maximum temperature.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0019
Kyoo Sil Choi, Ayoub Soulami, Wenning Liu, Xin Sun, Moe Khaleel
In this paper, the microstructure-based finite element modeling method is used in investigating the loading path dependence of formability of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. For this purpose, the effects of different loading path on the forming limit diagrams (FLD) of TRIP steels are qualitatively examined using the representative volume element (RVE) of a commercial TRIP800 steel. First, the modeling method was introduced, where a combined isotropic/kinematic hardening rule is adopted for the constituent phases in order to correctly describe the cyclic deformation behaviors of TRIP steels during the forming process with combined loading paths which may include the unloading between the two consecutive loadings. Material parameters for the constituent phases remained the same as those in the authors' previous study [ 1 ] except for some adjustments for the martensite phase due to the introduction of the new combined hardening rule.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0218
Johnson Joseph, S Raja, Y Charles Lu
Piezoelectric materials are smart materials that can undergo mechanical deformation when electrically or thermally activated. An electric voltage is generated on the surfaces when a piezoelectric material is subjected to a mechanical stress. This is referred to as the ‘direct effect’ and finds application as sensors. The external geometric form of this material changes when it is subjected to an applied voltage, known as ‘converse effect’ and has been employed in the actuator technology. Such piezoelectric actuators generate enormous forces and make highly precise movements that are extremely rapid, usually in the micrometer range. The current work is focused towards the realization and hence application of the actuator technology based on piezoelectric actuation. Finite element simulations are performed on different types of piezoelectric actuations to understand the working principle of various actuators.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0228
Anthony George Konstantino, Mark A. Levine
This paper summarizes the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) methodology, special equipment, set-up and testing that is recommended to properly characterize the surface of bearing journals that will not result in objectionable noise or vibration. Traditional surface profiles and finish callouts do not capture some of the key characteristics for addressing what is often the customer's greatest complaint, noise. Noise can vary based on the sensitivity of the vehicle but understanding how to accurately describe (design, test, and measure) a surface for a given vehicle can result in an optimized design and reduce process time during manufacturing. Furthermore, this paper will recommend techniques for determining the proper limits of the FFT callouts.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0199
Thomas Christiner, Wilfried Eichlseder, Istvan Gódor, Johannes Reiser, Franz Trieb, René Stuehlinger
Recent trends in mechanical engineering are focusing on optimization of components with respect both to weight and lifetime by using numerical simulation even in the early design stages. For a reliable prediction of in service performance by simulation, both loading as well as different damage and failure mechanisms that may be activated during operation have to be known. In mechanical engineering applications, cyclic loadings are most common. In many assemblies of moving components, contact problems under various lubrication conditions are lifetime-limiting. There, relative motion of contacting bodies combined with high loads transmitted via the contact surface lead to fretting fatigue failure. In this contribution a few selected results of a currently conducted research project are presented. The aim of this study was to examine the material behavior of a surface stressed steel. The influence of the Fretting regime on fatigue properties has been investigated.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0186
Manfred Baecker, Axel Gallrein, Michael Hack, Alessandro Toso
During the last ten years, there is a significant tendency in automotive design to use lower aspect ratio tires and meanwhile also more and more run-flat tires. In appropriate publications, the influences of these tire types on the dynamic loads - transferred from the road passing wheel center into the car - have been investigated pretty well, including comparative wheel force transducer measurements as well as simulation results. It could be shown that the fatigue input into the vehicle tends to increase when using low aspect ratio tires and particularly when using run-flat tires. But which influences do we get for the loading and fatigue behavior of the respective rims? While the influences on the vehicle are relatively easy to detect by using wheel force transducers, the local forces acting on the rim flange (when for example passing a high obstacle) are much more difficult to detect (in measurement as well as in simulation).
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