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Viewing 1 to 30 of 3504
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The advancement of forging technologies and processes has enabled the increased use of forged products to meet the demanding requirements of strength, durability, and reliability. While forgings are commonly used in aerospace manufacturing, the ability to make use of precision forging processes and techniques is critical when manufacturing gas turbine components. Realizing the benefits of accuracy and quality that precision forging brings to product manufacturing requires those involved with design and manufacturing have an understanding of industry accepted technology and processes.
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
A comprehensive and practical understanding of planetary gear trains is critical for individuals involved with the design and development of automatic transmissions. A key component of the automatic transmission system, the planetary gear train is able to deliver reliable gains in power, durability, higher torque-to-weight ratios, and configuration flexibility. This two-day seminar will provide participants an advanced and comprehensive presentation on the topics of planetary gear train design, development, and applications for automatic transmissions.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1146
Jan Macek, Oldrich Vitek, Zdenek Zak
The physical 1-D model of a radial turbine consists in a set of gas ducts featuring total pressure and/or temperature changes and losses. This model has been developed using the basic modules of generalized 1-D manifold solver. The tools for it were presented at SAE 2008 and 2009 World Congresses. The model published before is amended by a semi-empiric mechanical loss and windage loss modules. The instantaneous power of a turbine is integrated along the rotating impeller channel using Euler turbine theorem, which respects the local unsteadiness of mass flow rate along the channel. The main aim of the current contribution is to demonstrate the use of measured turbine maps for calibration of unsteady turbine model for different lay-outs of turbine blade cascades. It is important for VG turbines for the optimal matching to different engine speeds and loads requirements.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1136
Liu Yang, Chaochen Ma
Abstract A boost system with an auxiliary gas turbine used to recover diesel engine power at plateau conditions is proposed. System matching calculation, preliminary design, and performance simulation of the compressor with double parameter output are presented, as well as the preliminary design, flow simulation, and combustion process of the combustion chamber. Results show that the new system has better recovery performance and higher fuel economy potential than the simple charging scheme. For future research work, possible improvements and development direction are recommended.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2066
Ennes Sarradj, Thomas Geyer, Christoph Jobusch, Sebastian Kießling, Alexander Neefe
Abstract The development of energy-efficient and lightweight vehicles is a major challenge for researchers and engineers in the automotive industry, with one solution being the use of micro gas turbines in serial hybrid vehicles. Among other advantages, the use of a micro gas turbine instead of a reciprocating engine enables a high reliability and low emissions. What makes the concept of using a gas turbine even more interesting are its special NVH characteristics, which are quite different from those of a reciprocating engine. Besides the fact that a gas turbine in general produces less noise and vibration than a diesel engine of the same power, the characteristic noise spectrum is also very different. In this paper, the noise characteristics of a micro gas turbine are compared to those typical for a common reciprocating engine and the sources of the noise are considered.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580191
JAY S. PASMAN
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550141
H. A. Fremont
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550143
L.E. Berggren
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550142
W. WAI CHAO
SUMMARY Inasmuch as the future of small regenerative gas turbines depends on the compactness of its heat exchanger, the problem of selecting the engine design variables to facilitate the reduction of heat exchanger size is of vital importance and has been given detailed consideration. The effects of leakage and engine pressure loss factor, in relation to the conditions of minimum flow and minimum regeneration, and the corresponding pressure ratio requirements, have all been examined. In general, the minimum flow and regeneration required decrease with the engine pressure loss factor, which is, of course, favorable to heat exchanger size. However, in order to achieve compactness, a sufficient part of the engine pressure loss factor must be apportioned to the heat exchanger gas side pressure drop. Therefore, the importance of careful aerodynamic design to reduce pressure losses through the ducting cannot be over-stressed.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550139
P.F. Martinuzzi
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550145
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550144
Julius J. Harwood
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550288
D. K. Hanink, F. J. Webbere, A. L. Boegehold
DESCRIBED here is a new nickel-base alloy offering a combination of high-temperature strength, adequate ductility, and low strategic alloy content. Used in gas-turbine buckets where extremely high temperatures are encountered, GMR-235 has undergone a program of laboratory testing, development of foundry production and control methods, and extensive field testing with no failures.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550236
W. A. Turunen
FOR about five years, an exploratory project to study the application of gas turbines in automotive equipment has been conducted at the GM Research Laboratories. This paper summarizes the work thus far accomplished. Included here are descriptions of the two models of the Whirlfire gas-turbine engine developed and some operating experience obtained with these engines installed in the Firebird turbo-powered car and the Turbo-Cruiser transit bus. The Whirlfire installations have demonstrated that smooth, reliable operation, with very desirable power and torque characteristics, can be attained. They also indicate that future developments must be directed toward improved fuel economy, reduced acceleration time, and a suitable dynamic braking system.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560221
ROSS C. Hill
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570243
Reece V. Hensley, Norman C. Witbeck
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570242
GORDON SORENSON
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570247
WALLACE E. SKIDMORE
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570246
SUMNER ALPERT
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570057
G. J. Huebner
THIS paper discusses the progress of research on the automotive gas turbine and predicts its future potentialities. Comparison of gas turbines and presently used engines shows the possibilities of the gas-turbine applications. Design, construction, and testing of gas turbines are discussed, especially in the light of economy and performance.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570125
L. WILLIAMS
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570309
W. A. Turunen, R. Schilling, E. L. Baugh
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550012
A. H. BEAUFRERE
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540244
P.A. McGee
THE inherent simplicity of the gas turbine and its well-known success in aircraft applications is leading to its consideration for locomotive use. As a matter of fact, gas turbine locomotives have already found limited use by a few railroads throughout the world. The author discusses these applications and some of the lessons learned from them. He points out that, although the first gas turbine locomotive to be put in service was built in 1941 - the same year that the first commercial diesel locomotive was placed in service -the latter has forged rapidly ahead, so that today the railroads are about 75% dieselized. What, then, has held the gas turbine locomotive back? Mr. McGee points out that two of the most significant factors responsible are: 1. Metallurgical problems - the need for materials capable of withstanding the high temperatures encountered. 2. High fuel consumption.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560263
KENNETH L. JONES
The military aviation services pay a phenomenal price due to turbine engine stall. Several of the major factors which comprise a substantial portion of the total price are presented. Included are weapon system development time, operational limitations, field maintenance problems, overhaul costs and accident rates. Also presented, in a general fashion, are several technical approaches to the solution of turbine engine stall. Fundamental research and orderly development of basic engine components, power control systems, and airframe and installation factors are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the need for tighter control of production tolerances and the requirement for united efforts in the integration of components into a complete system.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560271
M. G. BEARD, F. W. KOLK
SUMMARY Potential sources of hazard from operation of gas turbine powered aircraft are examined. Comparison is made to the current operation of piston engines. It is concluded that gas turbines are potentially more reliable than piston engines, and they therefore are potentially safer, providing that sufficient care is used to combine all currently available knowledge and experience into the detail design of new aircraft-engine combinations. Specific recommendations are made for further coordination of engine designers and operators for better future power plants, such as better containment provisions, free-turbine arrangements for turbo-props and less surge-sensitive compressors.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560296
ROBERT C. JOHNSON
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560320
D.H. RAUCH, D.A. MALOHN
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3504

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