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Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Driven by high fuel prices, environmental regulations, and consumer demand, the market for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) has experienced rapid growth. Every major automotive company produces an HEV. There are approximately fifty different HEV models on the market and over eight million HEVs already sold. In order to meet current and future demands in the HEV and PHEV markets, success will depend on engineering personnel knowing how to develop and manufacture HEV powertrains. This two day seminar will cover the fundamentals of HEV powertrain design.
2010-10-25
Journal Article
2010-01-2165
David Serrano, Olivier Laget, Dominique Soleri, Stephane Richard, Benoit Douailler, Frederic Ravet, Marc Moreau, Nathalie Dioc
The introduction of alternative fuels is crucial to limit greenhouse gases. CNG is regarded as one of the most promising clean fuels given its worldwide availability, its low price and its intrinsic properties (high knocking resistance, low carbon content...). One way to optimize dedicated natural gas engines is to improve the CNG slow burning velocity compared to gasoline fuel and allow lean burn combustion mode. Besides optimization of the combustion chamber design, hydrogen addition to CNG is a promising solution to boost the combustion thanks to its fast burning rate, its wide flammability limits and its low quenching gap. This paper presents an investigation of different methane/hydrogen blends between 0% and 40 vol. % hydrogen ratio for three different combustion modes: stoichiometric, lean-burn and stoichiometric with EGR.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2170
Hermann Obermair, Riccardo Scarcelli, Thomas Wallner
This paper reports on research activities aiming to improve the efficiency of direct injected, hydrogen powered internal combustion engines. In a recent major change in the experimental setup the hydrogen single cylinder research engine at Argonne National Laboratory was upgraded to a new engine geometry providing increased compression ratio and a longer piston stroke compared to its predecessor. The higher compression ratio and the more advantageous volume to surface ratio of the combustion chamber are both intended to improve the overall efficiency of the experimental setup. Additionally, a new series of faster acting, piezo-activated injectors is used with the new engine providing increased flexibility for the optimization of DI injection strategies. This study focuses on the comparison of experimental data of the baseline versus the improved single cylinder research engine for similar engine operating conditions.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2194
Douglas R. Martin, Edward Badillo
The Auto Industry is responding to the environment and energy conservation concerns by ramping up production of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). As the initial hurdles of making the powertrain operate are overcome, challenges such as making the powertrain feel more refined and intuitive remain. This paper investigates one of the key parameters for delivering that refinement: engine RPM behavior. Ideal RPM behavior is explored and included in the design of a control system. System implications are examined with regard to the effect of engine RPM scheduling on Battery usage and vehicle responsiveness.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2195
Yongzheng Sun, Xianjing Li, Jun Deng, Zongjie Hu, Liguang Li, Anzhi Yang, Wenkai Sun
In this paper, based on the plug-in series hybrid electric vehicle development project, the vehicle technology solutions and the match of power system parameters were analyzed. The vehicle control strategies were identified and optimized according to plug-in hybrid vehicle features. The plug-in series hybrid, rule-based logic threshold switching control strategy, charge depleting (CD) mode and charge-sustaining (CS) mode are chosen according to the key factors, such as the environment, performance requirements, technical requirements and cost. And then the structure and model of vehicle control strategy were established to carry out vehicle energy management and power system control. The parameter selection, electric drive system matching, energy storage system design based on the requirement of vehicle performance, system architecture and control strategy are presented.
2010-10-25
Journal Article
2010-01-2204
Yue Ma, Ho Teng, Marina Thelliez
Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are becoming widely used high-energy sources and a replacement of the Nickel Metal Hydride batteries in electric vehicles (EV), hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). Because of their light weight and high energy density, Li-ion cells can significantly reduce the weight and volume of the battery packs for EVs, HEVs and PHEVs. Some materials in the Li-ion cells have low thermal stabilities and they may become thermally unstable when their working temperature becomes higher than the upper limit of allowed operating temperature range. Thus, the cell working temperature has a significant impact on the life of Li-ion batteries. A proper control of the cell working temperature is crucial to the safety of the battery system and improving the battery life. This paper outlines an approach for the thermal analysis of Li-ion battery cells and modules.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2214
Xianjing Li, Liguang Li, Yongzheng Sun, Zongjie Hu, Jun Deng
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) provide significantly improvement in fuel economy over conventional vehicles as well as reductions in greenhouse gas and petroleum. Numerous recent reports regarding control strategy, power train configuration, driving pattern, all electric range (AER) and their effects on fuel consumption and electric energy consumption of PHEVs are reported. Meanwhile, the control strategy for engine start-stop and mileage between recharging events from the electricity grid also has an important influence on the petroleum displacement potential of PHEVs, but few reports are published. In this paper, a detailed simulation model is set up for a plug-in series hybrid electric vehicle (PSHEV) employing the AVL CRUISE. The model was employed to predict the AER of the baseline PSHEV using rule-based logical threshold switching control strategy.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2213
Forrest Jehlik, Eric Rask, Martha Christenson
For this work, a methodology of modeling and predicting fuel consumption in a hybrid vehicle as a function of the engine operating temperature has been developed for cold ambient operation (-7°C, 266°K). This methodology requires two steps: 1) development of a temperature dependent engine brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) map, and, 2) a data-fitting technique for predicting engine temperature to be used as an input to the temperature dependent BSFC maps. For the first step, response surface methodology (RSM) techniques were applied to generate brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) maps as a function of the engine thermal state. For the second step, data fitting techniques were also used to fit a simplified lumped capacitance heat transfer model using several experimental datasets. Utilizing these techniques, an analysis of fuel consumption as a function of thermal state across a broad range of engine operating conditions is presented.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2218
Alberto Boretti
Improvements of vehicle fuel economy are being considered using a mechanically driven flywheel to reduce the amount of mechanical energy produced by the thermal engine recovering the vehicle kinetic energy during braking. A mechanical system having an overall efficiency over a full regenerative cycle of about 70%, about twice the efficiency of battery-based hybrids, is coupled to a naturally aspirated gasoline engine powering a full size sedan. Results of chassis dynamometer experiments and engine and vehicle simulations are used to evaluate the fuel benefits introducing a kinetic energy recovery system and downsizing of the engine. Preliminary results running the new European driving cycle (NEDC) show KERS may reduce fuel consumption by 25% without downsizing, and 33% with downsizing of the 4 litre engine to 3.3 litres.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2228
Alberto Boretti
Recovery of braking energy during driving cycles is the most effective option to improve fuel economy and reduce green house gas (GHG) emissions. Hybrid electric vehicles suffer the disadvantages of the four efficiency-reducing transformations in each regenerative braking cycle. Flywheel kinetic energy recovery systems (KERS) may boost this efficiency up to almost double values of about 70% avoiding all four of the efficiency-reducing transformations from one form of energy to another and keeping the vehicle's energy in the same form as when the vehicle starts braking when the vehicle is back up to speed. With reference to the baseline configuration with a 1.6 liters engine and no recovery of kinetic energy, introduction of KERS reduces the fuel usage to 3.16 liters per 100 km, corresponding to 82.4 g of CO₂ per km. The 1.6 liters Turbo Direct Injection (TDI) diesel engine without KERS uses 1.37 MJ per km of fuel energy, reducing with KERS to 1.13 MJ per km.
2010-10-19
Journal Article
2010-01-2320
Markus Jochim, Thomas M. Forest
FlexRay is a time triggered automotive communication protocol that connects ECUs (Electronic Control Units) on which distributed automotive applications are executed. If exact agreement (e.g. on physical values measured by redundant sensors on different ECUs) must be reached in the presence of asymmetric communication faults, a byzantine agreement protocol like Signed Messages (SM) can be utilized. This paper gives examples of how byzantine faults can emerge in a FlexRay-based system and proposes optimizations for a FlexRay-specific implementation of the SM protocol. The protocol modifications allow for a reduction in the number of protocol messages under a slightly relaxed fault model, as well as for a reduction in the number of messages to be temporarily stored by the ECUs.
2010-10-19
Journal Article
2010-01-2319
Mukund Ghangurde
With Ford SYNC, Microsoft Corporation and Ford Motor Company have democratized in-vehicle infotainment systems - delighting consumers and bringing a new kind of agility to the automobile industry. Built on Microsoft Auto (now Windows Embedded Automotive), Ford SYNC is a factory-installed, voice-controlled communications and entertainment system that allows drivers to converge their digital lifestyle with their life on the road. Windows Embedded Automotive is an industry leading technology platform that provides integrated infotainment features and a rich user interface. Car manufacturers and suppliers worldwide can use this software to create differentiated, infotainment in-vehicle systems that are immediately attractive to consumers.
2010-10-19
Journal Article
2010-01-2318
Chris Domin
Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) networks within the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) lead to safety and mobility improvements in vehicle road traffic. This paper presents case studies that support the realization of the ITS architecture as an evolutionary process, beginning with driver information systems for enhancing feedback to the users, semi-autonomous control systems for improved vehicle system management, and fully autonomous control for improving vehicle cooperation and management. The paper will also demonstrate how the automotive, telecom, and data and service providers are working together to develop new ITS technologies.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2324
Prasanta Sarkar, Debarsish Hazarika
This paper describes the development of Tata Nano Engine Management System and the related electrical and electronics architecture. The design criteria for the electrical and electronics architecture are discussed in detail in the body of the paper. When the Nano project was first conceived, the existing low cost car in India was not affordable by common people. The Nano project was targeted for a family of 4 which was using a two wheeled vehicle for commuting, irrespective of the season. For engineers, it was difficult to conceive the idea of the Nano vehicle and powertrain. How do you design a benchmark which meets both Indian and export needs and should also be extremely low in cost? There was no low cost car available either for the Nano to benchmark against. It was also clear that the strict pollution regulations existing in India could not be met without an Engine Management System and thus the focus centered on a low cost Engine Management System (EMS).
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2323
Keith Lang, Michael Kropinski, Tim Foster
GM's R oad-to- L ab-to- M ath (RLM) initiative is a fundamental engineering strategy leading to higher quality design, reduced structural cost, and improved product development time. GM started the RLM initiative several years ago and the RLM initiative has already provided successful results. The purpose of this paper is to detail the specific RLM efforts at GM related to powertrain controls development and calibration. This paper will focus on the current state of the art but will also examine the history and the future of these related activities. This paper will present a controls development environment and methodology for providing powertrain controls developers with virtual (in the absence of ECU and vehicle hardware) calibration capabilities within their current desktop controls development environment.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2322
Robert Gee
The interdisciplinary and structured integration of subsystems into a functioning whole is at the root of Systems Engineering. Until recently in the automotive market, much of this has been specific to an automotive subdomain such as Telematics, Infotainment, Chassis Control, or Engine Management Systems. In the realm of Telematics and Connected Vehicles, the recent trend has been outward from the vehicle, focusing on expanding connectivity and data sources. Systems Engineering for Telematics now includes multiple transports spanning PAN, WLAN, and WAN communications, and beyond that has grown to include entities on the far side of the network link, including data servers, aggregation portals, and network security.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2313
Robert White, Tao Zhang, Paul Tukey, Kevin Lu, David McNamara
This paper presents modeling, analysis, and results of the business viability of a set of IntelliDrive 1 safety applications in a free market setting. The primary value drivers for motorists to adopt the IntelliDrive system are based on a set of safety applications developed and analyzed by the US DOT. The modeling approach simulates IntelliDrive on-board equipment adoption by motorists based on the value of the safety applications. The simulation model uses parameters that are based on adoption rates in a similar dynamical system from recent history and incorporates feedback loops such as the positive reinforcement of vehicle-to-vehicle applications value due to increased adoption. This approach allows the analysis of alternative IntelliDrive business approaches, deployment scenarios, and policies. The net present value of the IntelliDrive system to the nation is computed under alternative scenarios.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2312
Masanori Ueda, Toshio Hirota, Atsushi Hatano
Curbing emissions of carbon dioxide (CO₂), which is believed by many scientists to be a major contributor to global warming, is one of the top priority issues that must be addressed by automobile manufacturers. Automakers have set their own strategies to improve fuel economy and to reduce CO₂ emissions. Some of them include integrated approaches, focusing on not only improvement of vehicle technology, but also human factors (eco-driving support for drivers) and social and transportation factors (traffic management by intelligent transportation systems [ITS]). Among them, electric vehicles (EVs) will be a key contributor to attaining the challenging goal of CO₂ reduction. Mass deployment of EVs is required to achieve a zero-emission society. To accomplish that, new advanced technologies, new business schemes, and new partnerships are required.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2314
Niall T. Berkery
Abstract Connectivity, software and services are the key elements that will define the next-generation vehicle experience. Drivers are being provided new innovative solutions that seamlessly integrate their online digital lifestyle into their vehicle environment, enabling automakers increased opportunity for brand differentiation, while giving drivers the ability to personalize their vehicles down to an individual level. This will be accomplished through “virtual accessorization” - where drivers will personalize their connected vehicle experience by choosing applications and services that best suit their individual needs. After selecting applications from an online automotive apps exchange, the apps are sent wirelessly to the car or the driver's smartphone for immediate use. The in-vehicle apps can also be configured based on who is driving, so that preferences and personal functionality moves with each driver.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2336
Veerender Kaul, Sarwant Singh, Krishnasami Rajagopalan, Michael Coury
1. ABSTRACT The U.S. National Highway Transportation and Safety Agency's (NHTSA) early estimates of Motor Traffic Fatalities in 2009 in the United States [1] show continuing progress on improving traffic safety on the U.S. roadways. The number of total fatalities and the fatality rate per 100 Million Vehicle Miles (MVM), both show continuing declines. In the 10 year period from 1999 through 2009, the total fatalities have dropped from 41,611 to 33,963 and the fatality rate has dropped from 1.5 fatalities per 100MVM to 1.16 fatalities per 100MVM, a compound annual drop of 2.01% and 2.54% respectively. The large number of traffic fatalities, and the slowing down of the fatality rate decline, compared to the decade before, continues to remain a cause of concern for regulators.
2010-10-19
Journal Article
2010-01-2337
Michael Darms, Florian Foelster, Jochen Schmidt, Dominik Froehlich, Alfred Eckert
Data fusion plays a central role in more and more automotive applications, especially for driver assistance systems. On the one hand the process of data fusion combines data and information to estimate or predict states of observed objects. On the other hand data fusion introduces abstraction layers for data description and allows building more flexible and modular systems. The data fusion process can be divided into a low-level processing (tracking and object discrimination) and a high level processing (situation assessment). High level processing becomes more and more the focus of current research as different assistance applications will be combined into one comprehensive assistance system. Different levels/strategies for data fusion can be distinguished: Fusion on raw data level, fusion on feature level and fusion on decision level. All fusion strategies can be found in current driver assistance implementations.
2010-10-19
Journal Article
2010-01-2334
Falke Hendriks, Riné Pelders, Martijn Tideman
Active safety systems are increasingly becoming available in trucks and passenger vehicles. Developments in the field of active safety are shifting from increasing driver comfort towards increasing occupant safety. Furthermore, this shift is seen within active safety systems: safety functions are added to existing comfort systems, rather than adding new safety systems to the vehicle. Comfort systems such as cruise control are extended via ACC to pre-crash braking systems. Testing of active safety systems must follow these developments. Whereas standardized test programs are available for passive safety systems, such test programs are hardly available yet for active safety systems. Furthermore, test programs for passive safety systems consist of only a handful of scenarios. Test programs for active safety systems, however, should consist of much more scenarios, as those systems should function well in many different situations.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2335
Jeffrey D. Rupp, Anthony G. King
Successful demonstrations of fully autonomous vehicle operation in controlled situations are leading to increased research investment and activity. This has already resulted in significant advancements in the underlying technologies necessary to make it a practical reality someday. Not only are these idealized events sparking imaginations with the potential benefits for safety, convenience, fuel economy and emissions, they also embolden some to make somewhat surprising and sometimes astonishing projections for their appearance on public roads in the near future. Are we now ready for a giant leap forward to the self-driving car with all its complexity and inter-dependencies? Humans will need to grow with and adapt to the technological advancements of the machine and we'll deeply challenge our social and political paradigms before we're done. Even if we as engineers are ready, is the driving public ready?
2010-10-19
Journal Article
2010-01-2339
Richard Altendorfer, Sebastian Wirkert, Sascha Heinrichs-Bartscher
Driver assistance systems are incorporating more and more advanced safety functions. As these functions have to react quickly and reliably in emergency situations with a false alarm rate close to zero a high integrity of the environmental perception is required. This elevated level of signal integrity can be achieved by data fusion, where the information of several, in general heterogeneous sensors is combined to obtain a better model of the environment in terms of accuracy, object integrity, object identity, etc. As an example, we demonstrate the power of sensor fusion by an automatic emergency brake (AEB) system whose environmental perception is based upon a video camera and a radar sensor. In particular we discuss the improvement of kinematic attributes such as object lateral distance as well as the object's confidence or probability of existence.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2328
Jinming Yang, Jason Bauman, Al Beydoun
An effective methodology for design verification and product validation is always a key to high quality products. As many body control applications are currently implemented across multiple ECUs distributed on one or more vehicle networks, verification and validation of vehicle-level user functions will require availability of both the vehicle networks and multiple ECUs involved in the implementation of the user functions. While the ECUs are usually developed by different suppliers and vehicle networks' infrastructure and communication protocols are normally maintained and developed by the OEM, each supplier will be faced with a similar challenge - the ECU being developed cannot be fully verified and tested until all other ECUs and their communication networks are available in the final development stage.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2329
Edoardo Sivera
Automotive systems are obviously becoming more and more complex. In fact, a typical vehicle is built using various communication networks, many electronic units and a never ending amount of software! The main problem automakers face now is related to the integration of different distributed functionalities, and often these functionalities are based on software. For these reasons it is very important to have an approach at “system” level in order to assure that the complete vehicle conforms to requirements and the statement of needs. It is also important that the testing phases assure a complete coverage of all requirements, in order to verify all system aspects. In this context, the software, in general, plays an important role during all phases of system development: from requirement analysis, system architecture definition, system implementation and testing phases. The software is generally acquired by external suppliers and is already programmed in the electronic devices.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2327
Roger Shulze, P.K. Mallick
The automotive industry is expected to accelerate the transition to revolutionary products, rapid changes in technology and increasing technological sophistication. This will require engineers to advance their knowledge, connect and integrate different areas of knowledge and be skilled in synthesis. In addition, they must learn to work in cross-disciplinary teams and adopt a systems approach. The College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) at the University of Michigan-Dearborn (UM-Dearborn) responded by creating interdisciplinary MS and Ph.D. programs in automotive systems engineering (ASE) and augmenting them with hands-on research. Students at the undergraduate level can also engage in numerous ASE activities. UM-Dearborn's ASE programs offer interesting and possibly unique advantages. The first is that it offers a spectrum of ASE degree and credit programs, from the MS to the Ph.D. to continuing education.
2010-10-19
Journal Article
2010-01-2332
Jorge Sans Sangorrin, Jan Sparbert, Ulrike Ahlrichs, Wolfgang Branz, Oliver Schwindt
Active safety systems will have a great impact in the next generation of vehicles. This is partly originated by the increasing consumer's interest for safety and partly by new traffic safety laws. Control actions in the vehicle are based on an extensive environment model which contains information about relevant objects in vehicle surroundings. Sensor data fusion integrates measurements from different surround sensors into this environment model. In order to avoid system malfunctions, high reliability in the interpretation of the situation, and therefore in the environment model, is essential. Hence, the main idea of data fusion is to make use of the advantages of using multiple sensors and different technologies in order to fulfill these requirements, which are especially high due to autonomous interventions in vehicle dynamics (e. g. automatic emergency braking).
2010-10-19
Journal Article
2010-01-2333
Zachary Doerzaph, Thomas A. Dingus, Jon Hankey
The design of a safe transportation system requires numerous design decisions that should be based on data acquired by rigorous scientific method. Naturalistic data collection and analysis methods are a relatively new addition to the engineer's toolbox. The naturalistic method is based on unobtrusively monitoring driver and vehicle performance under normal, everyday, driving conditions; generally for extended collection periods. The method generates a wealth of data that is particularly well-suited for identifying the underlying causes of safety deficiencies. Furthermore, the method also provides robust data for the design and evaluation of safety enhancement systems through field studies. Recently the instrumentation required to do this type of study has become much more cost effective allowing larger numbers of vehicles to be instrumented at a fraction of the cost. This paper will first provide an overview of the naturalistic method including comparisons to other available methods.
2010-10-05
Technical Paper
2010-01-2010
Josko Petric
Recent innovative drives in hydraulics could introduce very competitive hybrid hydraulic vehicles (HHV). These drives has been considered and analyzed only in the serial HHV architecture. The series-parallel transmission architecture, also called power-split or e-CVT is highlighted as the most popular concept for full (strong) hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). The examples are one-mode power-split in Toyota Prius and two-mode (compound) power-split in GM-Allison EVT. Ambitions to make the hybrid hydraulic power trains better and more efficient would certainly require deeper analysis of more complex power-split (series-parallel) HHV transmission structures and related optimal controls. This paper presents bond graph based mathematical model of kinematics of a one-mode and a two-mode power-split hybrid hydraulic vehicle transmissions which are based on their hybrid electrical counterpart.
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