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Viewing 1 to 30 of 115
2010-09-28
Technical Paper
2010-32-0061
Kai W. Beck, Fatih Sarikoc, Ulrich Spicher, Hans Van den Hoevel, Martin Duerrwaechter, Heribert Kammerstetter, Tim Gegg, Armin Kölmel
Unstable combustion and high cyclic variations of the in-cylinder pressure associated with low engine running smoothness and high emissions are mainly caused by cyclic variations of the fresh charge composition, the variability of the ignition and the fuel mass. These parameters affect the inflammation, the burn rate and thus the whole combustion process. In this paper, the effects of fluctuating fuel mass on the combustion behavior are shown. Small two-stroke engines require special measuring and testing equipment, especially for measuring the fuel consumption at very low fuel flow rates as well as very low fuel supply pressures. To realize a cycle-resolved measurement of the injected fuel mass, fuel consumption measurement with high resolution and high dynamic response is not enough for this application.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0395
Damien Le Guen, Thomas Weck, Adrien Balihe, Benoit Verbeke
Today's powertrains are becoming more and more complex due to the increasing number of gear box types requiring gearshift patterns like conventional (equipped with GSI) and automatic-manual transmissions (AT, AMT), double clutch and continuous variable transmissions (DCT, CVT). This increasing variety of gear boxes requires a higher effort for the overall optimization of the powertrain. At the same time, it is necessary to assess the impact of different powertrains and control strategies on CO₂ emissions very early in the development process. The optimization of Gear Shift Patterns (G.S.P.) has to fulfill multiple constraints in terms of objective customers' requirements, like driveability, NVH, performance, emissions and fuel consumption. For these reasons, RENAULT and AVL entered an engineering collaboration in order to develop a dedicated simulation tool: CRUISE GSP.
2010-06-09
Journal Article
2010-01-1421
Josef Girstmair, Hans H. Priebsch, Franz Reich, Josef Zehetner
In the virtual development process validated simulation models are requested to accurately predict power train vibration and comfort phenomena. Conclusions from refined parameter studies enable to avoid costly tests on rigs and on the road. Thereby, an appropriate modeling approach for specific phenomena has to be chosen to ensure high quality results. But then, parameters for characterizing the dynamic properties of components are often insufficient and have to be roughly estimated in this development stage. This results in a imprecise prediction of power train resonances and in a less conclusive understanding of the considered phenomena. Conclusions for improvements remain uncertain. This paper deals with the two different aspects of model refinement and parameter updating. First an existing power train model (predecessor power train) is analyzed whether the underlying modeling approach can reproduce the physical behavior of the power train dynamics adequately.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-1202
Sasa Bukovnik, Tigran Parikyan, Thomas Resch, Wolfgang Hellinger
Mechanical variable valve systems are being increasingly used for modern combustion engines. It is typical for such systems that the cam and valve are connected via intermediate levers. Different maximum valve lifts and duration can be achieved with the same cam profile. The intermediate levers increase the system inertia and reduce the overall stiffness. Such systems offer more flexibility, but it is more complex to create optimal design compared to the conventional systems. In this paper a new kinematic design methodology for a CVVL (Continuously Variable Valve Lift) system is presented. Additionally, dynamic analysis of the valve train system is performed. The investigated valve train is completely developed and patented by OEM. The main characteristic of the CVVL system is a set of intermediate levers between the cam and the finger follower like ( 1 , 2 ). One cam drives two intake valves over a set of levers.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0784
Johann C. Wurzenberger, Peter Bartsch, Tomaz Katrasnik
The present work introduces a fully integrated real-time (RT) capable engine and vehicle model. The gas path and drive line are described in the time domain of seconds whereas the reciprocating characteristics of an IC engine are reflected by a crank angle resolved cylinder model. The RT engine model is derived from a high fidelity 1D cycle simulation and gas exchange model to support an efficient and consistent transfer of model data like geometries, heat transfer or combustion. The workflow of model calibration and application is outlined and base ECU functionalities for boost pressure, EGR, smoke and idle speed control are applied for transient engine operation. Steady state results of the RT engine model are compared to experimental data and 1D high fidelity simulations for 19 different engine load points. In addition an NEDC (New European Drive Cycle) is simulated and results are evaluated with data from chassis dynamometer measurements.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1454
Thomas Resch, Borislav Klarin
The target of dynamic simulation is to investigate complex engine dynamic behavior in the whole speed range under different loading conditions in the most effective way during Engine Development Process (EDP). AVL has developed a method for transient run-up analysis by using the simulation tool AVL EXCITE. The main objective of this new method is the controlled speed increase by defining a speed ramp. Transient run-up analysis is of interest for different kind of analysis during the EDP, such as crankshaft dynamics and strength, low frequency vibration analysis, bracket strength and durability analysis, acoustic analysis, etc. By using this method the time required for simulations and thus the whole project duration is significantly reduced. Conventionally the speed range is divided in single speed steps and for each speed a separate transient simulation has to be performed. The number of these simulations depends on the required speed resolution.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1094
Johann C. Wurzenberger, Tomaz Katrasnik
This works presents a real-time capable simulation model for dual fuel operated engines. The computational performance is reached by an optimized filling and emptying modeling approach applying tailored models for in-cylinder combustion and species transport in the gas path. The highly complex phenomena taking place during Diesel and gasoline type combustion are covered by explicit approaches supported by testbed data. The impact of the thermodynamic characteristics induced by the different fuels is described by an appropriate set of transport equations in combination with specifically prepared property databases. A thermodynamic highly accurate 6-species approach is presented. Additionally, a 3-species and a 1-species transport approach relying on the assumption of a lumped fuel are investigated regarding accuracy and computational performance. The comparison of measured and simulated pressure and temperature traces shows very good agreement.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1095
Christoph Poetsch
Abstract The present works presents a real-time capable engine model with physical based description of the fuel injection and the combustion process. The model uses a crank-angle resolved cylinder model and a filling and emptying approach for cylinder and gas-path interaction. A common rail injection system model is developed and implemented into the real-time engine framework. The injection model calculates injection quantity and injection rate profile from the input of the ECU signals target injection pressure and injection timing. The model accounts for pressure oscillations in the injection system. A phenomenological combustion model for Diesel engines is implemented, which is based on the mixing controlled combustion modeling approach. The combustion model calculates the rate of heat release from the injection rate given by the injection model.
2013-09-08
Technical Paper
2013-24-0030
Christoph Poetsch, Henrik Schuemie, Herwig Ofner, Reinhard Tatschl, Oldrich Vitek
In spark-ignition engines, fluctuations of the in-cylinder pressure trace and the apparent rate of heat release are usually observed from one cycle to another. These Cycle-to-Cycle Variations (CCV) are affected by the early flame development and the subsequent flame front propagation. The CCV are responsible for engine performance (e.g. fuel consumption) and the knock behavior. The occurrence of the phenomena is unpredictable and the stochastic nature offers challenges in the optimization of engine control strategies. In the present work, CCV are analyzed in terms of their impact on the engine knock behavior and the related efficiency. Target is to estimate the possible fuel consumption savings in steady-state operation and in the drivecycle, when CCV are reduced. Since CCV are immanent on real engines, such a study can only be done by means of simulation.
2013-09-08
Journal Article
2013-24-0006
Valdas Caika, Peter Sampl, David Greif
To promote advanced combustion strategies complying with stringent emission regulations of CI engines, computational models have to accurately predict the injector inner flow and cavitation development in the nozzle. This paper describes a coupled 1D/2D/3D modeling technique for the simulation of fuel flow and nozzle cavitation in diesel injection systems. The new technique comprises 1D fuel flow, 2D multi-body dynamics and 3D modeling of nozzle inner flow using a multi-fluid method. The 1D/2D model of the common rail injector is created with AVL software Boost-Hydsim. The computational mesh including the nozzle sac with spray holes is generated with AVL meshing tool Fame. 3D multi-phase calculations are performed with AVL software FIRE. The co-simulation procedure is controlled by Boost-Hydsim. Initially Hydsim performs a standalone 1D simulation until the needle lift reaches a prescribed tolerance (typically 2 to 5 μm).
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1512
Jaegon Yoo, Klaus Pfeiffer, Koo-Tae Kang
Advanced powertrain test, which is simulating real road load condition, was performed on the dynamic test bed. This cutting edge system can reproduce real road resistance based upon the vehicle dynamic model and wheel slip model. This wheel slip function is simulating the real behavior of the powertrain wheel as close as possible at each wheel independently. Additionally, low inertia of dynamometer motor themselves is another advantage for this purpose. This test bed is capable of testing all kinds of 2WD and 4WD powertrain configuration regardless of transmission type. Also, vehicle configuration can be mounted and tested on this test bed with small addition of supporting system alternatively. For the application, a four wheel drive powertrain was mounted on the test bed and driveline noise and vibration behavior such as transfer rattling noise and tip in/out shock were reproduced on this test bed.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1526
Gianluca Montenegro, Augusto Della Torre, Angelo Onorati, Robert Fairbrother, Andreas Dolinar
The acoustic simulation of internal combustion engine exhaust systems is an important aspect to meet customer expectations and legislation targets. One dimensional gas dynamic simulation tools are used for the calculation of the exhaust orifice noise in the early stages of the engine development process. This includes the prediction of the acoustic performance of individual components in the exhaust line. One common element used in exhaust systems to increase the acoustic damping is the plug flow muffler. This study looks at the prediction of acoustic performance of various plug mufflers at different flow velocities. These include a single plug muffler, a double plug muffler and an eccentric plug muffler with different porosities for the perforated sections. To this purpose a generic 3D cell approach was developed and applied.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1438
Johann C. Wurzenberger, Sophie Bardubitzki, Peter Bartsch, Tomaz Katrasnik
Modern Diesel engines require an integrated development of combustion strategies, air management and exhaust aftertreatment. This study presents a comprehensive simulation approach with the aim to support engine development activities in the virtual environment. A real-time capable engine, vehicle and control model is extended by three key features. First, a pollutant production model is embedded in a two-zone cylinder model. Second, a framework for catalytic pollutant conversion is built focusing on modern diesel exhaust aftertreatment systems. Third, an extended species transport model is introduced considering the transport of pollutants through the air path. The entire plant model is validated on the example of a passenger car Diesel engine. The predicted engine behavior is compared with steady-state measurements. The NO formation model is investigated for a series of steady-state and transient operating conditions.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1439
Christoph Poetsch, Herwig Ofner, Eberhard Schutting
The paper describes a universally structured simulation platform which is used for the analysis and prediction of combustion in compression ignition (CI) engines. The models are on a zero-dimensional crank angle resolved basis as commonly used for engine cycle simulations. This platform represents a kind of thermodynamic framework which can be linked to single and multi zone combustion models. It is mainly used as work environment for the development and testing of new models which thereafter are implemented to other codes. One recent development task focused on a multi zone combustion model which corresponds to the approach of Hiroyasu. This model was taken from literature, extended with additional features described in this paper, and implemented into the thermodynamic simulation platform.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0919
Hubert M. Herbst, Hans H Priebsch
The sealing effect of piston rings in reciprocating engines have a major impact on blow-by and lube oil consumption (LOC). The sealing is achieved by the gas forces acting on the top and back side of the rings. In addition, the load in the radial direction is increased by the initial ring tension. Inertia forces arising from the oscillating vertical stroke and shear forces due to the secondary piston movement influence this sealing effect by a reduction in contact pressure. Numerical simulation of the piston and ring dynamics solves this non-linear problem and predicts the interaction between piston secondary motion, axial ring motion, and 2nd land pressure. This paper describes the modeling of the cylinder kit dynamics of a six-cylinder truck diesel engine for several operating conditions and ring modifications. The influence of boundary conditions and adjustment parameters on piston ring motion and gas penetration was investigated.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0798
Christoph R. Weidinger, Franz Kampelmühler, Heinz Schimpl, Norbert Kreft
Increasing requirements for the result quality of exhaust emission analyzers and state of the art analyzer technology require a new point of view regarding measuring range definitions and linearization procedures. To make best use of the power of this analyzer technology, linearization procedures need reconsideration. In certification laboratories, legislation defines the procedures to linearize an exhaust emission analyzer more or less stringently. On the other hand, on testbeds for development purposes there are many possibilities for making use of today's improved analyzers. However, procedures are often used in development labs that are very similar to those mentioned in the legislation. For some measurement purposes it is necessary to leave these procedures regarding measuring ranges and their specifications behind. The exhaust gas analyzing system has to provide consistent result quality during the whole test procedure.
2011-09-11
Technical Paper
2011-24-0206
Ernst Winklhofer, Matthias Neubauer, Alois Hirsch, Harald Philipp
Combustion of premixed stoichiometric charge is free of soot particle formation. Consequently, the development of direct injection (DI) spark ignition (SI) engines aims at providing premixed charge to avoid or minimize soot formation in order to meet particle emissions targets. Engine development methods not only need precise engine-out particle measurement instrumentation but also sensors and measurement techniques which enable identification of in-cylinder soot formation sources under all relevant engine test conditions. Such identification is made possible by recording flame radiation signals and with analysis of such signals for premixed and diffusion flame signatures. This paper presents measurement techniques and analysis methods under normal engine and vehicle test procedures to minimize sooting combustion modes in transient engine operation.
2011-09-11
Technical Paper
2011-24-0006
Valdas Caika, Peter Sampl
The paper is devoted to the coupled 1D-3D modeling technology of injector flow and cavitation in diesel injections systems. The technology is based on the 1D simulation of the injector with the AVL software BOOST-HYDSIM and 3D modeling of the nozzle flow with AVL FIRE. The nozzle mesh with spray holes and certain part of the nozzle chamber is created with the FIRE preprocessor. The border between the 1D and 3D simulation regions can be chosen inside the nozzle chamber at any position along the needle shaft. Actual coupling version of both software tools considers only one-dimensional (longitudinal) needle motion. Forthcoming version already includes the two-dimensional motion of the needle. Furthermore, special models for the needle tip contact with the nozzle seat and needle guide contact with the nozzle wall are developed in HYDSIM. The co-simulation technology is applied for different common rail injectors in several projects.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0897
Zdenek Neusser, Martin Sopouch, Thomas Schaffner, Hans-Herwig Priebsch
Gear trains applied to automotive transmissions and combustion engines are potential excitation sources of undesired whine noise. Consequently, the prediction of gear whine issues in an early stage of the product development process is strongly requested. Beside the actual excitation mechanism which is closely related to the gear's transmission error, the vibratory behavior (e.g. resonances) of other affected components like shafts, bearings and housing plays an important role in terms of structure borne noise transfer. The paper deals with gear contact models of different degree of detail, which are embedded in a multi-body dynamics (MBD) environment. Since gear meshing frequency and their harmonics may easily reach up to 5 kHz or even 10 kHz, applied gear contact models must be highly efficient with respect to calculation performance. Otherwise, major requirements of the development process in terms of process time can not be satisfied as is the case with FEA-based contact models.
2010-06-09
Technical Paper
2010-01-1419
Albert Albers, Christian Zingel, Josef Zehetner, Klaus Meitz
Cost- and time-efficient vehicle development is increasingly depending on the usage of adequate software tools to enhance effectiveness. The aim is a continuous integration of simulation tools and test environments within the vehicle development process in order to save time and costs. This paper introduces a procedure to reveal the cause of low-frequency powertrain vibrations and the influences on the dynamic behavior of a vehicle on a roller test bench. The affected longitudinal acceleration signal is an arbitrative criterion for the driveability assessment with AVL-DRIVE™, a well-known driveability analysis and development tool for the objective assessment concerning NVH and driveability aspects of full vehicles. These experimental studies are embedded into an approach, which describes the functional assembly of three applied test environments "road," "roller test bench" and "simulation" with according tools in order to facilitate an integrated driveability development process.
2010-06-09
Journal Article
2010-01-1410
Borislav Klarin, Mario Jelovic, Thomas Resch
The target of the investigation is the particular influence of a fuel injection system and its components as a noise source in automotive engines. The applied methodology is demonstrated on an automotive Inline 4-cylinder Diesel engine using a common rail system. This methodology is targeted as an extension of a typical standard acoustic simulation approach for combustion engines. Such approaches basically use multi-body dynamic simulation with interacting FEM based flexible structures, where the main excitation crank train, timing drive, valve train system and piston secondary motion are considered. Within the extended approach the noise excitation of the hydraulic and mechanical parts of the entire fuel system is calculated and subsequently considered within the multi-body dynamic simulation for acoustic evaluation of structural vibrations.
2010-06-09
Journal Article
2010-01-1404
Alfred Rust, Bernhard J. Graf
Intensive R&D is currently performed worldwide on hybrid and electric vehicles. For full electric vehicles the driving range is limited by the capacity of currently available batteries. If such a vehicle shall increase its driving range some range extending backup system should be available. Such a Range Extender is a small system of combustion engine and electric generator which produces the required electricity for charging the batteries in time. Since the acoustic response of an electric motor driving the vehicle and of a combustion engine as part of a Range Extender is very different by nature an extensive acoustic tuning of the Range Extender is necessary to meet the requirements of exterior vehicle noise and passenger comfort. This paper describes the NVH (noise, vibration & harshness) development work of a range extender within the AVL approach of an electrically driven passenger car with range extender.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0331
Henry Joswa Rajan, Joseph Kelly, Harald Hoetzendorfer, Nikolaus Keuth, Horst Pfluegl, Thomas Winsel, Siegfried Roeck
Today's calibration process for ECU functions is often based on a wide variety of proprietary tools and individual expert knowledge of calibration engineers. Automatic calibration with an industrialized tool chain provides high potential to reduce testbed time, calibration time and project costs. Based on an efficient measurement procedure in combination with an offline calibration methodology the capability is validated, e.g. for calibrating the ECU function “Air Charge Determination” for SI engines. In this article the implementation, in a series production project of a major OEM, is shown. The whole workflow - which can also be applied to other calibration tasks - will be described in detail. Presented here will be how General Motors Corporation (GM) is able to speed up the calibration of the ECU functions, whilst maintaining at least the same quality of calibration as before, by the use of this tool chain.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0329
Manuel Nebel, Marie-Sophie Vogels, Timo Combe, Thomas Winsel, Horst Pfluegl, Christoph Hametner
The modern power train calibration process is characterized by shorter development cycles and a reduced number of prototypes. However, simultaneously exhaust aftertreatment and emission testing is becoming increasingly more sophisticated. The introduction of predictive simulation tools that represent the complete power train can likely contribute to improving the efficiency of the calibration process using an integral model based workflow. Engine models, which are purely based on complex physical principles, are usually not capable of real-time applications, especially if the simulation is focused on transient emission optimization. Methods, structures and the realization of a global dynamic real-time model are presented in this paper, combining physical knowledge and experimental models and also static and dynamic sub-structures. Such a model, with physical a priori information embedded in the model structure, provides excellent generalization capability.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0249
Markus Riener, Patrick Siebenbrunner, Wolfgang Beer, Joerg Achten
At the moment the documentation of failure inhibition matrices and the fault path management for different controller types and different vehicle projects are mainly maintained manually in individual Excel tables. This is not only time consuming but also gives a high potential for fault liability. In addition there is also no guarantee that the calibration of these failure inhibition matrices and its fault path really works. Conflicting aims between costs, time and fault liability require a new approach for the calibration, documentation and testing of failure inhibition matrices and the complete Diagnostic System Management (DSM) calibration. The standardization and harmonization of the Diagnostic System Management calibration for different calibration projects and derivates is the first step to reduce time and costs. Creating a master calibration for the conjoint fault paths and labels provides a significant reduction of efforts.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0239
Michael Karner, Christian Steger, Reinhold weiss, Eric Armengaud, Markus Pistauer, Felix Pfister
Efficient integration of mechanics and microelectronics components is nowadays a must within the automotive industry in order to minimize integration risks and support optimization of the entire system. We propose in this work a cross domain co-simulation platform for the efficient analysis of mechatronic systems. The interfacing of two state-of-the-art simulation platforms provides a direct link between the two domains at an early development stage, thus enabling the validation and optimization of the system already during modeling phase. The proposed cross-domain co-simulation is used within our TEODACS project for the analysis of the FlexRay technology. We illustrate using a drive-by-wire use case how the different architecture choices may influence the system.
2012-06-13
Journal Article
2012-01-1561
Alois Sontacchi, Robert Holdrich, Josef Girstmair, Hannes Allmaier, Stefan Bikker, Alfred Rust
In the past the exterior and interior noise level of vehicles has been largely reduced to follow stricter legislation and due to the demand of the customers. As a consequence, the noise quality and no longer the noise level inside the vehicle plays a crucial role. For an economic development of new powertrains it is important to assess noise quality already in early development stages by the use of simulation. Recent progress in NVH simulation methods of powertrain and vehicle in time and frequency domain provides the basis to pre-calculated sound pressure signals at arbitrary positions in the car interior. Advanced simulation tools for elastic multi-body simulation and novel strategies to measure acoustical transfer paths are combined to achieve this goal. In order to evaluate the obtained sound impression a roughness prediction model has been developed. The proposed roughness model is a continuation of the model published by Hoeldrich and Pflueger.
2012-10-23
Technical Paper
2012-32-0106
Christian Hubmann, Wolfgang Schoeffmann, Hubert Friedl, Bernhard Graf
Beside the automotive industry, where 2-cylinder inline engines are catching attention again, twin-cylinder configurations are quite usual in the small engine world. From stationary engines and range-extender use to small motorcycles up to big cruisers and K-Cars this engine architecture is used in many types of applications. Because of very good overall packaging, performance characteristics and not least the possibility of parts-commonality with 4-cylinder engines nearly every motorcycle manufacturer provides an inline twin in its model range. Especially for motorcycle applications where generally the engine is a rigid member of the frame and vibrations can be transferred directly to the rider an appropriate balancing system is required.
2013-03-25
Technical Paper
2013-01-0128
Gerhard Kokalj, Ruangrit Ekachaiworasin
The automotive industry is racing to introduce some degree of hybridization into their product ranges. Since the term "hybrid vehicle" can cover a wide range of differing technologies and drivetrain topologies, this has led to a plethora of vehicles that call them "hybrid." This poses an interesting challenge for marketers to differentiate these vehicles from the incumbents. However, it is not just the marketers who are faced with challenges, the developers of such hybrid drivetrains are faced with a rise in technical complexity due to the wide range of operating modes hybridization introduces. As propulsive torque is being generated in more than one place in a hybrid vehicle, the transitions from conventional drive to electrically supported drive bring with them complex aspects of multi-dimensional system control. The challenge is to be able to implement hybrid technology in an existing drivetrain, while adapting the existing components as required.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0558
Christoph Poetsch, Tomaz Katrasnik
Abstract The present work introduces an innovative mechanistically based 0D spray model which is coupled to a combustion model on the basis of an advanced mixture controlled combustion approach. The model calculates the rate of heat release based on the injection rate profile and the in-cylinder state. The air/fuel distribution in the spray is predicted based on momentum conservation by applying first principles. On the basis of the 2-zone cylinder framework, NOx emissions are calculated by the Zeldovich mechanism. The combustion and emission models are calibrated and validated with a series of dedicated test bed data specifically revealing its capability of describing the impact of variations of EGR, injection timing, and injection pressure. A model based optimization is carried out, aiming at an optimum trade-off between fuel consumption and engine-out emissions. The findings serve to estimate an economic optimum point in the NOx/BSFC trade-off.
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